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Flatfootedness

Posted by Manny L. on 11/02/00 at 19:35 (031847)

I have had PF before. I am also flatfooted. I've been prescribed othodics before and they've worked for awhile, but now the PF is back. I plan to see a podiatrist and expect him to prescribe orthidics with increased support. I am very active and enjoy sports that are not very good for my condition (basketball, beach volleyball). I know the best solution is to stop these sports altogether. But, I'd rather not. I love these two sports. I could probably lose weight. But is there anything else that I can do to allow me to continue these sports? Are there any excercises that I can do for flatfootedness? I know about the 'toe curling' excercise, in which you pull in a towel with your toes. It was prescribe by my doctor when he prescribed the orthodics. I was to lazy to do them and eventually relied completely on the orthodics. Now the arch on my foot is already completely collapsed. Is there a point in which this excercise becomes ineffective?

Re: Flatfootedness

Richard, C.Ped on 11/03/00 at 07:30 (031860)

Hi Manny. I too love basketball and beach volleyball (as well as grass and indoor volleyball). I treat many athletes ranging from recreational to semi-pro at my office. I fill prescriptions for custom orthotics. I have had physicians write for orthotics as well as different types of ankle/arch/metatarsal braces. The braces being elastic, etc. If you play beach volleyball barefoot, most of us do, that is not as bad as basketball on a hard surface. Our feet are known as mobile adaptors. The will usually accomodate the surface we stand or walk on. The soft sand of the beach cradles our feet naturaly. We were not made to walk, stand, or run on perfectly flat, hard wooden or concrete surfaces. I do not have PF, but, when playing indoor or outdoor volleyball, I wear orthotics as well as a strap on ankle brace. I have provided the same brace to beach volleyball players with success. They are still able to play barefoot and have adequate support to their ankle and arches. You may want to look into this. If you have any questions, please let me know. I will be happy to help you find someone in your area that can help you. If you need an v-ball partner, let me know as well. :-)
Richard, Certified Pedorthist

Re: Flatfootedness

LynMaire on 11/04/00 at 09:32 (031922)

Richard,

My 14 yr. old son, with VERY flat, very wide feet, has just begun to develop PF caused by participation is his high school competition marching band. Today, for instance, the practice is from 9a.m.-9p.m. and during the week he always has three 3-hour practices. During football games, when not performing, they have to stand for the entire game - not allowed to be seated even though they're in the bleachers.

All this is putting a lot of stress on his feet, but he loves it so much there is no possibility that he'd consider giving it up. He has permission to get off his feet at games if his feet are bothering him, but won't because he doesn't think it's fair to his fellow band members. Try talking some sense into a 14 yr. old male!!

I took him to a Podiatrist yesterday to get some inserts (gave us Footfirst brand)for the upcoming national competion this following week; he'll go back for custom orthotic fittings later this month. The problem is that the inserts raise his heel out of his athletic shoes. Are there any athletic shoe brands with a deeper heel that you know of that are more suited to flat feet? We're going tomorrow to buy a new pair for his practices.

He doesn't want to wear the inserts with his marching shoes because he was to roll his foot in an exaggerated manner during competion and thinks an insert will interfere with his technique. The Podiatrist assured him that the custom orthotics, made of graphite, won't interfere with his marching.

Do you have any suggestions about other inserts especially for flat feet? I've looked at the one's offered on the Flatfoot.com site. Most typical inserts seem to have raised arch supports which would really hurt him more since he has no discernable arch.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

Re: Flatfootedness

wendyn on 11/04/00 at 09:47 (031924)

I have a 15 year old son, so I know how impossible it is to reason with them.

We have some doctors and a pedorthotist on this board who I'm sure will give you great advice.

My advice would be to certainly not start out with the inserts full throttle during a performance. What happens if they hurt him after 15 minutes? Ideally he will break them in very slowly. Especially with his flat flat feet - probably 15 minutes one day, 30 the next, 60 the next etc. My podiatrist assured me that my rigid plastic orthotics would be fine for me. They eventually caused me a whole host of new problems. Just be very careful and if your son tells you they hurt - please listen to him. He needs to start paying attention to his feet and to the pain - and stop ignoring it.

You may want to try a motion control shoe BEFORE you try the orthotics. Ask at any good running store or specialized shoe store

Re: Flatfootedness

JudyS on 11/04/00 at 09:51 (031926)

Richard, what is a 'metatarsal brace'? And, can you guide me to a qualified Pedorthist in the San Diego area? Thankyou

Re: Flatfootedness

LynMaire on 11/04/00 at 14:26 (031944)

Wendyn, thank you for telling me about using motion control shoes. He uses regular athletic shoes to practice in and that's when he'd use his orthotics. Performances where he uses his marching shoes only last 15 minutes, so he won't bother with othotics for that short time.

Since he has to do a lot of slides from side to side, I'm wondering if a cross-training shoe with motion control would be the best bet. I get discouraged looking for shoes, because I rarely find sales persons knowledgeable about the differences in shoes, even in specialty sport-shoe shops

Re: Flatfootedness

Kay S on 11/05/00 at 16:35 (032008)

I have tried many shoe brands, but find that New Balance works the best with my orthotics, taking out the removable liner that comes with them. Also, one of my many docs said that I should replace my shoes every six months, as they break down. NB also come in widths, which is helpful for those of us with either narrow or wide feet. (on top of all our other problems!) Good luck with your flatfooted son!

Re: Flatfootedness

Richard, C.Ped on 11/06/00 at 08:43 (032062)

Hi Judy. I use the Scott Ankle support. This has two 'straps' with Velcro. You pull it across the mets and around the ankle then Velcro it to itself. It supports the ankle as well as the mets. It works great for me. It is nice and tight. I found one C.Ped in the San Diego area. Juan Mendoza at Ability Biomechanics Int'l. 619-285-5040. Look up the Board for Certification in Pedorthics to see if there are more. I did not know any surrounding towns. This is the only one listed for San Diego.
Richard

Re: Thanks, Richard! eom

JudyS on 11/07/00 at 10:19 (032166)

:)

Re: Thank you Richard for your help!

LynMaire on 11/08/00 at 06:48 (032232)

Message Number 32233
Re: Thank you Richard for your help! View Thread
Posted by Richard, C.Ped on 11/08/00 at 07:51


You are very welcome! I will be sending you an email with some extra information. Good luck to you and your son.
Richard

Re: Flatfootedness

Richard, C.Ped on 11/03/00 at 07:30 (031860)

Hi Manny. I too love basketball and beach volleyball (as well as grass and indoor volleyball). I treat many athletes ranging from recreational to semi-pro at my office. I fill prescriptions for custom orthotics. I have had physicians write for orthotics as well as different types of ankle/arch/metatarsal braces. The braces being elastic, etc. If you play beach volleyball barefoot, most of us do, that is not as bad as basketball on a hard surface. Our feet are known as mobile adaptors. The will usually accomodate the surface we stand or walk on. The soft sand of the beach cradles our feet naturaly. We were not made to walk, stand, or run on perfectly flat, hard wooden or concrete surfaces. I do not have PF, but, when playing indoor or outdoor volleyball, I wear orthotics as well as a strap on ankle brace. I have provided the same brace to beach volleyball players with success. They are still able to play barefoot and have adequate support to their ankle and arches. You may want to look into this. If you have any questions, please let me know. I will be happy to help you find someone in your area that can help you. If you need an v-ball partner, let me know as well. :-)
Richard, Certified Pedorthist

Re: Flatfootedness

LynMaire on 11/04/00 at 09:32 (031922)

Richard,

My 14 yr. old son, with VERY flat, very wide feet, has just begun to develop PF caused by participation is his high school competition marching band. Today, for instance, the practice is from 9a.m.-9p.m. and during the week he always has three 3-hour practices. During football games, when not performing, they have to stand for the entire game - not allowed to be seated even though they're in the bleachers.

All this is putting a lot of stress on his feet, but he loves it so much there is no possibility that he'd consider giving it up. He has permission to get off his feet at games if his feet are bothering him, but won't because he doesn't think it's fair to his fellow band members. Try talking some sense into a 14 yr. old male!!

I took him to a Podiatrist yesterday to get some inserts (gave us Footfirst brand)for the upcoming national competion this following week; he'll go back for custom orthotic fittings later this month. The problem is that the inserts raise his heel out of his athletic shoes. Are there any athletic shoe brands with a deeper heel that you know of that are more suited to flat feet? We're going tomorrow to buy a new pair for his practices.

He doesn't want to wear the inserts with his marching shoes because he was to roll his foot in an exaggerated manner during competion and thinks an insert will interfere with his technique. The Podiatrist assured him that the custom orthotics, made of graphite, won't interfere with his marching.

Do you have any suggestions about other inserts especially for flat feet? I've looked at the one's offered on the Flatfoot.com site. Most typical inserts seem to have raised arch supports which would really hurt him more since he has no discernable arch.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

Re: Flatfootedness

wendyn on 11/04/00 at 09:47 (031924)

I have a 15 year old son, so I know how impossible it is to reason with them.

We have some doctors and a pedorthotist on this board who I'm sure will give you great advice.

My advice would be to certainly not start out with the inserts full throttle during a performance. What happens if they hurt him after 15 minutes? Ideally he will break them in very slowly. Especially with his flat flat feet - probably 15 minutes one day, 30 the next, 60 the next etc. My podiatrist assured me that my rigid plastic orthotics would be fine for me. They eventually caused me a whole host of new problems. Just be very careful and if your son tells you they hurt - please listen to him. He needs to start paying attention to his feet and to the pain - and stop ignoring it.

You may want to try a motion control shoe BEFORE you try the orthotics. Ask at any good running store or specialized shoe store

Re: Flatfootedness

JudyS on 11/04/00 at 09:51 (031926)

Richard, what is a 'metatarsal brace'? And, can you guide me to a qualified Pedorthist in the San Diego area? Thankyou

Re: Flatfootedness

LynMaire on 11/04/00 at 14:26 (031944)

Wendyn, thank you for telling me about using motion control shoes. He uses regular athletic shoes to practice in and that's when he'd use his orthotics. Performances where he uses his marching shoes only last 15 minutes, so he won't bother with othotics for that short time.

Since he has to do a lot of slides from side to side, I'm wondering if a cross-training shoe with motion control would be the best bet. I get discouraged looking for shoes, because I rarely find sales persons knowledgeable about the differences in shoes, even in specialty sport-shoe shops

Re: Flatfootedness

Kay S on 11/05/00 at 16:35 (032008)

I have tried many shoe brands, but find that New Balance works the best with my orthotics, taking out the removable liner that comes with them. Also, one of my many docs said that I should replace my shoes every six months, as they break down. NB also come in widths, which is helpful for those of us with either narrow or wide feet. (on top of all our other problems!) Good luck with your flatfooted son!

Re: Flatfootedness

Richard, C.Ped on 11/06/00 at 08:43 (032062)

Hi Judy. I use the Scott Ankle support. This has two 'straps' with Velcro. You pull it across the mets and around the ankle then Velcro it to itself. It supports the ankle as well as the mets. It works great for me. It is nice and tight. I found one C.Ped in the San Diego area. Juan Mendoza at Ability Biomechanics Int'l. 619-285-5040. Look up the Board for Certification in Pedorthics to see if there are more. I did not know any surrounding towns. This is the only one listed for San Diego.
Richard

Re: Thanks, Richard! eom

JudyS on 11/07/00 at 10:19 (032166)

:)

Re: Thank you Richard for your help!

LynMaire on 11/08/00 at 06:48 (032232)

Message Number 32233
Re: Thank you Richard for your help! View Thread
Posted by Richard, C.Ped on 11/08/00 at 07:51


You are very welcome! I will be sending you an email with some extra information. Good luck to you and your son.
Richard