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pt

Posted by Paula on 11/18/00 at 21:01 (033041)

my physical therapy consists of being forced to walk laps in a pool. i beg to be allowed to stretch calf muscles first to little avail. after walking much faster than i can, not being allowed to take a full, correct step , i am in agony after each session.. these idiots are affiliated with a hospital.. i guess i stick with it cause after 7 doctors from hell i really have no hope that i will ever find a medical professional who knows, cares about anything. this is in atlanta ga in case anyone has ever heard of a pt who is competent here. i cannot walk on land yet, especially since these fools seem to injure me worse with each session. they tell me this sort of pain is necessary at the beginning of pt.

Re: pt

Bob G. on 11/18/00 at 23:37 (033044)

Don't count on the government for anything (obviously) - they will leave you hanging in telephone 'hell'!

Paula, you need to take control of your own destiney...I am sorry for the pain you are suffering, but YOU need to get yourself out of it - It is up to you, not somebody else.

I am aware of your misery, and want you to be well as soon as possible. You can find help here, from competent professionals (you may be not getting good private care or advise), or from your own research (this is a good source of information).

At risk of sounding political, I am advising you to reach out and find the solution yourself without depending elsewhere on some government agency. (The bigger government gets the more frustrated we all become.)

Best wishes, Paula! BG

Re: pt

Barb-NY on 11/19/00 at 12:47 (033066)

Nobody can force you to do anything without your consent. They force you to walk fast laps? They won't let you stretch? Did they hold a gun to your head? (Sorry to be so blunt) Stop being a victom. My PT tried to make me go faster and harder than I knew I could. When he tried, I told him 'NO, NO, NO'. I am in control here. I know what I can and cannot do. I go at my own pace and at my own level. If he doesn't like it, he can go to heck!!! Well, I won. And now he understands my concerns.

Believe me, I know it's hard to find competent doctors and therapists. But you eventually will find one. I finally did and I am finally getting (a little) better.

If 7 doctors were bad, try an 8th. And there has to be a few PTs in Atlanta who are good. It's a big city.

No gain without pain........BS!

Re: pt

JudyS on 11/19/00 at 14:00 (033070)

Paula - it is very normal for soreness to be present with and after PT. As with any exercise, your muscles are reacting to new demands. I've not yet heard of a PT who 'makes' you hurt to the point of further damage. You get to stop whenever you want. You, after all, are the only means of communication between your muscles and your Physical Therapist. One of the great things you get to do while you're taking charge of your progress is exercise the power of positive thinking. At this point, after reading your posts for some time now, I have a feeling that that tool is the very best one you could use. You may be on your 7th or 8th medical professional, but YOU remain constant throughout. When I was at my most frustrating moment last spring, after 2 years of this, I realized two things; one, I wasn't REALLY following significant resting and therapeutic procedures (I kept waiting for it to cure itself or for a doctor to inject an immediate cure) and two, I had to take charge instead of 'waiting' any longer for the cure-fairy to wave her magic wand. So I did these things; less aggressive activity, read posts here, new and old, for a solid week and eventually culled what seemed like a consistent method of progress from hundreds of messages. Then, from those I developed my own program for taking charge. And that program ended up consisting of all the traditional methodology! Lessening demand on the feet, ibuprofen, mild stretchening, strengthening, icing. Most of which is what most PT's do in their initial treatments. I made significant progress with that but it wasn't enough because I was too far gone - which was my own darn fault. Now those methods have been coupled with deep-tissue massage and things are much better. But.....there is no letting up. My whole point here is that once you decide that you are the common denominator, and you get to be in charge, that's half the battle. And, as BobG indicates, letting go of what can't be is equally as effective. If we wait for a special medical professional to cure our PF it'll be a long wait. Most will say that there is no instant cure and that all cases are different. You know your case, you know what you can or can't do, you know what you're willing to try - if you're willing to try. And, you know that many medical folks do, in fact, have something to offer. Listen to your physical therapist, and make sure he's listening to you. Together the two of you WILL develop a method that is good for you.

Re: pt

T. Hurst on 11/19/00 at 15:11 (033076)

I have just started post-op pt myself after epf surgery on both feet. I was scared they would not understand my condition and hurt me. But through communication on my pain levels and what works and doesn't, I am slowly getting into a routine that is helping. For instance, they put me on a treadmill for 10 minutes of fast walking on my first visit. We have slowly backed that down to 5 minutes based on my complaints of too much pain. Now we will work upwards. I think the most important part of pt is not what you do in their office, but what they teach you to do on your own. If your pt is not giving you 'homework', I would find a new one. Best of luck to you & don't give up.

Re: pt

Bob G. on 11/18/00 at 23:37 (033044)

Don't count on the government for anything (obviously) - they will leave you hanging in telephone 'hell'!

Paula, you need to take control of your own destiney...I am sorry for the pain you are suffering, but YOU need to get yourself out of it - It is up to you, not somebody else.

I am aware of your misery, and want you to be well as soon as possible. You can find help here, from competent professionals (you may be not getting good private care or advise), or from your own research (this is a good source of information).

At risk of sounding political, I am advising you to reach out and find the solution yourself without depending elsewhere on some government agency. (The bigger government gets the more frustrated we all become.)

Best wishes, Paula! BG

Re: pt

Barb-NY on 11/19/00 at 12:47 (033066)

Nobody can force you to do anything without your consent. They force you to walk fast laps? They won't let you stretch? Did they hold a gun to your head? (Sorry to be so blunt) Stop being a victom. My PT tried to make me go faster and harder than I knew I could. When he tried, I told him 'NO, NO, NO'. I am in control here. I know what I can and cannot do. I go at my own pace and at my own level. If he doesn't like it, he can go to heck!!! Well, I won. And now he understands my concerns.

Believe me, I know it's hard to find competent doctors and therapists. But you eventually will find one. I finally did and I am finally getting (a little) better.

If 7 doctors were bad, try an 8th. And there has to be a few PTs in Atlanta who are good. It's a big city.

No gain without pain........BS!

Re: pt

JudyS on 11/19/00 at 14:00 (033070)

Paula - it is very normal for soreness to be present with and after PT. As with any exercise, your muscles are reacting to new demands. I've not yet heard of a PT who 'makes' you hurt to the point of further damage. You get to stop whenever you want. You, after all, are the only means of communication between your muscles and your Physical Therapist. One of the great things you get to do while you're taking charge of your progress is exercise the power of positive thinking. At this point, after reading your posts for some time now, I have a feeling that that tool is the very best one you could use. You may be on your 7th or 8th medical professional, but YOU remain constant throughout. When I was at my most frustrating moment last spring, after 2 years of this, I realized two things; one, I wasn't REALLY following significant resting and therapeutic procedures (I kept waiting for it to cure itself or for a doctor to inject an immediate cure) and two, I had to take charge instead of 'waiting' any longer for the cure-fairy to wave her magic wand. So I did these things; less aggressive activity, read posts here, new and old, for a solid week and eventually culled what seemed like a consistent method of progress from hundreds of messages. Then, from those I developed my own program for taking charge. And that program ended up consisting of all the traditional methodology! Lessening demand on the feet, ibuprofen, mild stretchening, strengthening, icing. Most of which is what most PT's do in their initial treatments. I made significant progress with that but it wasn't enough because I was too far gone - which was my own darn fault. Now those methods have been coupled with deep-tissue massage and things are much better. But.....there is no letting up. My whole point here is that once you decide that you are the common denominator, and you get to be in charge, that's half the battle. And, as BobG indicates, letting go of what can't be is equally as effective. If we wait for a special medical professional to cure our PF it'll be a long wait. Most will say that there is no instant cure and that all cases are different. You know your case, you know what you can or can't do, you know what you're willing to try - if you're willing to try. And, you know that many medical folks do, in fact, have something to offer. Listen to your physical therapist, and make sure he's listening to you. Together the two of you WILL develop a method that is good for you.

Re: pt

T. Hurst on 11/19/00 at 15:11 (033076)

I have just started post-op pt myself after epf surgery on both feet. I was scared they would not understand my condition and hurt me. But through communication on my pain levels and what works and doesn't, I am slowly getting into a routine that is helping. For instance, they put me on a treadmill for 10 minutes of fast walking on my first visit. We have slowly backed that down to 5 minutes based on my complaints of too much pain. Now we will work upwards. I think the most important part of pt is not what you do in their office, but what they teach you to do on your own. If your pt is not giving you 'homework', I would find a new one. Best of luck to you & don't give up.