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What shoes to buy ?

Posted by Tim D on 11/21/00 at 13:24 (033243)

I am male, 51, and have experienced PF for only 1 year. From what I continue to read, this is something that I will have to endure for life. With this in mind, are there any shoe manufacturers that offer products designed to help us ? If not, can someone recommend a particular band, style or design suitable for white-collar professionals ?

Re: What shoes to buy ?

Richard, C.Ped on 11/21/00 at 13:48 (033246)

Hi Tim,
There are many styles and brands of shoes out there for the professional with foot pain/problems. Drew and P.W. Minor are just a couple. These brands are usually considered orthopedic shoes. In my facility, these are two of the most popular brands that my professional customers like. Drew is my personal favorite. I own three pair of Drew shoes. Two are the same style, but different color. It is the saddle style, one brown on brown nubuck and the other black calf. The other style is a very nice dress shoe.

Per the company, and myself, these are good for the PF diagnosis. Very well construced shoes. The are also considered 'depth' shoes and are able to accomodate a full length orthotic insert.

Check your yellow pages for the listing 'orthopedic shoes'. You should be able to find someone who carries good shoes for PF, or can at least point you in the right direction.
Good luck,
Richard, C.Ped

Re: What shoes to buy ?

davidb on 11/21/00 at 14:08 (033248)

I wear PW Minor shoes and they are great for orthotics because of the extra depth. They are extremely comfortable and have all the features that foot professionals say are supposedly important for those of us with PF. They also come in extremely wide widths, which is helpful for me.

Re: What shoes to buy ?

Brad - NY on 11/22/00 at 23:39 (033347)

I would recommend Rockport walking shoes -- there are a few types, but I found some that are wonderful, soft and cushiony
Also, Saucony running shoes, for casual wear, and Birkenstock sandals...Good luck.

Re: What shoes to buy ?

Marjorita on 11/24/00 at 09:31 (033386)

Hi,

I recommend New Balance for an atheletic shoe, with a rollbar to impede bending at the arch. They come in a variety of sizes and widths.

You don't have to live with this for life: with strengthening, rest and changed habits you can recover and be active again. You've only had it for a year; don't let it go on!

Good luck,
Marjorita

Re: What shoes to buy ?

john h on 11/24/00 at 11:46 (033390)

also checkout 'Joseph Siebel' shoes. Sold in finner shoe stores. lots of toe room, very well made and are probably my best shoe along with the Rockport Pro Walker. I have considered P.W. Minor because of their depth. You can checkout the P.W. Minor websit

Re: What shoes to buy ? Know your foot type

Donna S. on 11/24/00 at 12:51 (033401)

Marjorita,

I'm glad you found a shoe that works for you.

But, the roller bar New Balance shoes can be devastating for a person with a high arch. I was wearing the 851 NB running shoe with the roller bar for walking, and over a period of time, it contributed too if not caused my PF. The rollerbar is an anti-pronation device, and it will cause a high arched person who supinates to supinate even more, and cause them to walk on the outside of their feet, and put stress on the fascia. Even a person with a normal foot may eventually supinate as the lateral side of the shoe wears. The hard plastic on the rollerbar especially on the medial side never wears down. It's only a good shoe for someone who pronates excessively. It's very exagerated, because its to be used for running, and people who pronate will pronate more when running.

My PF improved over 50% when I stopped wearing the shoe, and went into a neutral crosstrainer.

I've noticed a lot of PF sufferers on this board have a high arch, so it's important to know your foot type when choosing footwear. To be on the safe side if you don't pronate excessively, you are better off in a good supportive neutral shoe. For athletic shoes, I recommend a good running inspired cross trainer, because they usually have a flexible cushioned forefoot, but are very stable in the midfoot, and also laterally stable. The are usually in the middle price range. Cross trainers are more supportive than most running and walking shoes, and run wider too. I've had a lot of success with the Ascis Hermosa cross trainer, but they are difficult to find now. The Asics Newporter, and Gel de sol are nice ones too, but they run very small, and you must size up considerably. Nike, and Saucony make some nice cross trainers also. I think most of the Adidas crosstrainers are too stiff in the forefoot. Also, most of the neutral New Balance cross trainers are not very supportive. Some times I feel a little lower in some cross trainers, so I put a very firm rubber lift in the heel under the insole (1/8 of an inch).

You have to careful. Some of the New Balance's top of the line cross trainers, have a medial post, which is almost as bad as the rollerbar. Make sure the shoe does not have any type of medial post or dual density material on the medial side if you do not pronate.

The same goes for OTC inserts for shoes. Make sure they are not posted on the medial side, or you could have the same problems.

Re: Re:How do you know if it has a rollerbar or dual density?

Beverly on 11/24/00 at 18:43 (033420)

I have a slightly high arch... bordering on normal, and I pronate some but not excessively. So how do I know if a shoe has a rollerbar? And how do I know if it has dual density at the medial area? This is all over my head.
I wear the Brooks Beast running shoe. I runs wide and has been my best try so far. I have no idea if it has any of these things. I do know it has alot of support.
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: Re:How do you know if it has a rollerbar or dual density?

Julie F on 11/25/00 at 03:31 (033458)

Beverly, specialist shops that sell sports shoes will be able to tell you what type of foot a shoe is good for, and whether it has a roller bar. I recently bought a pair of New Balance shoes (recommended by my pod as a good anti-pronation shoe) and the shop I bought them in had a written description next to every one of the dozens of shoes on display. If a shoe had a roller bar the description made that clear. This was what I needed, but, as Donna said, it is not what someone with a high arch who supinates needs. So I guess the answer is to buy shoes in a specialist shop where the staff knows their stuff.

Julie

Re: Re:How do you know if it has a rollerbar or dual density?

john h on 11/25/00 at 11:26 (033470)

the new balance 852 has a rollbar and it reads 'rollbar' in the inside edge of the shoe where the roll bar begins. if there if a store near you 'Just For Feet' ask the sales people to show you shoes with rollbars. New Balance has a couple at least including the 852 and newer series. If you have toe problems rollbars are especially desireable. many shoes have dual density soles-to many to name here. the sole should be stiff but bend just back of the toe area. it definitely should not bend in the fascia area. most experts say change shoes every 300-400 miles. that could be decades for a PF sufferer.

Re: Re:How do you know if it has a rollerbar or dual density?

Julie F on 11/25/00 at 12:44 (033477)

The New Balance 852 has been succeeded by the 853.

Re: Re:How do you know if it has a rollerbar or dual density? Look for the grey

Donna S. on 11/25/00 at 15:56 (033492)

Beverly,

You can usually tell if a shoe has a dual density material in the medial area by looking at the color on the inside from the heel area to the arch. It is almost always a medium to dark grey color, compared to the rest of the sole. Sometimes hard plastic is used in this area. New balance rollar bar shoes will say 'rollerbar', but others will only have the dark grey material. Sometimes these fall under the catagory of 'stability' shoes. The Beast is one of the better motion control shoes, and one of the few shoes that is somewhat balanced on the lateral side. If you look on the outside of the Beast you will see a smaller post which is similiar to the inside one. This helps keep the foot a little straighter. As the shoe wears though even the smaller lateral post will be over powered by the big medial post, if you do not pronate. If you like the Beast then you may like the New Balance 1120, or 587 running shoe, because they are balanced on the lateral side also, and are classified for pronators.

Roadrunner sports online usually gives a good description of each shoe , and what foot type it is for. They don't carry all styles though. Look under the running store section, and click on each shoe to get a general idea.

http://www.roadrunnersports.com

I wish shoes were laterally posted for us supinators. I've also found some adidas performance cushioned running shoes that are a little more stable, because they are lower to the ground than other running shoes, and the midsoles are a little firmer. A lot of them have a torsion bar for midfoot stability. I've found in general the cushioned shoes in the $75.00 to $80.00 price range are the best. The lower priced ones are too mushy especially in the heel, and the the higher priced ones almost have to much cushion. At least for walking that is.
Donna

Re: Re:Thanks for such a great shoe education!

Beverly on 11/25/00 at 16:38 (033495)

Donna,

Thank you for all that info. I've been a devoted fan of this board for going on nine months, but this is the first lesson I've gotten on the details of my athletic shoes in terms of which ones are better for pronators, suplinators, and how to recongize dual density. I'm going to bookmark that roadrunners website.

So, it sounds like my Brooks Beast was a good choice if it has some lateral balance too. I like it because it runs wide and has a very stable builtup heel.
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: Re:Thanks for such a great shoe education! Beast name change

Donna S. on 11/25/00 at 17:07 (033500)

Beverly,
I'm glad I could be of some help.

In case you haven't bought the Beast lately, Brooks has changed the name 'Beast' to 'Ariel' for women only. Just so you know the Beast is not discontined. It's the same shoe, with some slight improvements, and a different name. They extended the medial piece, and have a better removeable insole. Some running stores still know it as the Beast. I guess they thought the name sounded a little more feminine for women.

Also, ask roadrunners to send you a free catalog.

Donna

'

Re: What shoes to buy ?

Richard, C.Ped on 11/21/00 at 13:48 (033246)

Hi Tim,
There are many styles and brands of shoes out there for the professional with foot pain/problems. Drew and P.W. Minor are just a couple. These brands are usually considered orthopedic shoes. In my facility, these are two of the most popular brands that my professional customers like. Drew is my personal favorite. I own three pair of Drew shoes. Two are the same style, but different color. It is the saddle style, one brown on brown nubuck and the other black calf. The other style is a very nice dress shoe.

Per the company, and myself, these are good for the PF diagnosis. Very well construced shoes. The are also considered 'depth' shoes and are able to accomodate a full length orthotic insert.

Check your yellow pages for the listing 'orthopedic shoes'. You should be able to find someone who carries good shoes for PF, or can at least point you in the right direction.
Good luck,
Richard, C.Ped

Re: What shoes to buy ?

davidb on 11/21/00 at 14:08 (033248)

I wear PW Minor shoes and they are great for orthotics because of the extra depth. They are extremely comfortable and have all the features that foot professionals say are supposedly important for those of us with PF. They also come in extremely wide widths, which is helpful for me.

Re: What shoes to buy ?

Brad - NY on 11/22/00 at 23:39 (033347)

I would recommend Rockport walking shoes -- there are a few types, but I found some that are wonderful, soft and cushiony
Also, Saucony running shoes, for casual wear, and Birkenstock sandals...Good luck.

Re: What shoes to buy ?

Marjorita on 11/24/00 at 09:31 (033386)

Hi,

I recommend New Balance for an atheletic shoe, with a rollbar to impede bending at the arch. They come in a variety of sizes and widths.

You don't have to live with this for life: with strengthening, rest and changed habits you can recover and be active again. You've only had it for a year; don't let it go on!

Good luck,
Marjorita

Re: What shoes to buy ?

john h on 11/24/00 at 11:46 (033390)

also checkout 'Joseph Siebel' shoes. Sold in finner shoe stores. lots of toe room, very well made and are probably my best shoe along with the Rockport Pro Walker. I have considered P.W. Minor because of their depth. You can checkout the P.W. Minor websit

Re: What shoes to buy ? Know your foot type

Donna S. on 11/24/00 at 12:51 (033401)

Marjorita,

I'm glad you found a shoe that works for you.

But, the roller bar New Balance shoes can be devastating for a person with a high arch. I was wearing the 851 NB running shoe with the roller bar for walking, and over a period of time, it contributed too if not caused my PF. The rollerbar is an anti-pronation device, and it will cause a high arched person who supinates to supinate even more, and cause them to walk on the outside of their feet, and put stress on the fascia. Even a person with a normal foot may eventually supinate as the lateral side of the shoe wears. The hard plastic on the rollerbar especially on the medial side never wears down. It's only a good shoe for someone who pronates excessively. It's very exagerated, because its to be used for running, and people who pronate will pronate more when running.

My PF improved over 50% when I stopped wearing the shoe, and went into a neutral crosstrainer.

I've noticed a lot of PF sufferers on this board have a high arch, so it's important to know your foot type when choosing footwear. To be on the safe side if you don't pronate excessively, you are better off in a good supportive neutral shoe. For athletic shoes, I recommend a good running inspired cross trainer, because they usually have a flexible cushioned forefoot, but are very stable in the midfoot, and also laterally stable. The are usually in the middle price range. Cross trainers are more supportive than most running and walking shoes, and run wider too. I've had a lot of success with the Ascis Hermosa cross trainer, but they are difficult to find now. The Asics Newporter, and Gel de sol are nice ones too, but they run very small, and you must size up considerably. Nike, and Saucony make some nice cross trainers also. I think most of the Adidas crosstrainers are too stiff in the forefoot. Also, most of the neutral New Balance cross trainers are not very supportive. Some times I feel a little lower in some cross trainers, so I put a very firm rubber lift in the heel under the insole (1/8 of an inch).

You have to careful. Some of the New Balance's top of the line cross trainers, have a medial post, which is almost as bad as the rollerbar. Make sure the shoe does not have any type of medial post or dual density material on the medial side if you do not pronate.

The same goes for OTC inserts for shoes. Make sure they are not posted on the medial side, or you could have the same problems.

Re: Re:How do you know if it has a rollerbar or dual density?

Beverly on 11/24/00 at 18:43 (033420)

I have a slightly high arch... bordering on normal, and I pronate some but not excessively. So how do I know if a shoe has a rollerbar? And how do I know if it has dual density at the medial area? This is all over my head.
I wear the Brooks Beast running shoe. I runs wide and has been my best try so far. I have no idea if it has any of these things. I do know it has alot of support.
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: Re:How do you know if it has a rollerbar or dual density?

Julie F on 11/25/00 at 03:31 (033458)

Beverly, specialist shops that sell sports shoes will be able to tell you what type of foot a shoe is good for, and whether it has a roller bar. I recently bought a pair of New Balance shoes (recommended by my pod as a good anti-pronation shoe) and the shop I bought them in had a written description next to every one of the dozens of shoes on display. If a shoe had a roller bar the description made that clear. This was what I needed, but, as Donna said, it is not what someone with a high arch who supinates needs. So I guess the answer is to buy shoes in a specialist shop where the staff knows their stuff.

Julie

Re: Re:How do you know if it has a rollerbar or dual density?

john h on 11/25/00 at 11:26 (033470)

the new balance 852 has a rollbar and it reads 'rollbar' in the inside edge of the shoe where the roll bar begins. if there if a store near you 'Just For Feet' ask the sales people to show you shoes with rollbars. New Balance has a couple at least including the 852 and newer series. If you have toe problems rollbars are especially desireable. many shoes have dual density soles-to many to name here. the sole should be stiff but bend just back of the toe area. it definitely should not bend in the fascia area. most experts say change shoes every 300-400 miles. that could be decades for a PF sufferer.

Re: Re:How do you know if it has a rollerbar or dual density?

Julie F on 11/25/00 at 12:44 (033477)

The New Balance 852 has been succeeded by the 853.

Re: Re:How do you know if it has a rollerbar or dual density? Look for the grey

Donna S. on 11/25/00 at 15:56 (033492)

Beverly,

You can usually tell if a shoe has a dual density material in the medial area by looking at the color on the inside from the heel area to the arch. It is almost always a medium to dark grey color, compared to the rest of the sole. Sometimes hard plastic is used in this area. New balance rollar bar shoes will say 'rollerbar', but others will only have the dark grey material. Sometimes these fall under the catagory of 'stability' shoes. The Beast is one of the better motion control shoes, and one of the few shoes that is somewhat balanced on the lateral side. If you look on the outside of the Beast you will see a smaller post which is similiar to the inside one. This helps keep the foot a little straighter. As the shoe wears though even the smaller lateral post will be over powered by the big medial post, if you do not pronate. If you like the Beast then you may like the New Balance 1120, or 587 running shoe, because they are balanced on the lateral side also, and are classified for pronators.

Roadrunner sports online usually gives a good description of each shoe , and what foot type it is for. They don't carry all styles though. Look under the running store section, and click on each shoe to get a general idea.

http://www.roadrunnersports.com

I wish shoes were laterally posted for us supinators. I've also found some adidas performance cushioned running shoes that are a little more stable, because they are lower to the ground than other running shoes, and the midsoles are a little firmer. A lot of them have a torsion bar for midfoot stability. I've found in general the cushioned shoes in the $75.00 to $80.00 price range are the best. The lower priced ones are too mushy especially in the heel, and the the higher priced ones almost have to much cushion. At least for walking that is.
Donna

Re: Re:Thanks for such a great shoe education!

Beverly on 11/25/00 at 16:38 (033495)

Donna,

Thank you for all that info. I've been a devoted fan of this board for going on nine months, but this is the first lesson I've gotten on the details of my athletic shoes in terms of which ones are better for pronators, suplinators, and how to recongize dual density. I'm going to bookmark that roadrunners website.

So, it sounds like my Brooks Beast was a good choice if it has some lateral balance too. I like it because it runs wide and has a very stable builtup heel.
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: Re:Thanks for such a great shoe education! Beast name change

Donna S. on 11/25/00 at 17:07 (033500)

Beverly,
I'm glad I could be of some help.

In case you haven't bought the Beast lately, Brooks has changed the name 'Beast' to 'Ariel' for women only. Just so you know the Beast is not discontined. It's the same shoe, with some slight improvements, and a different name. They extended the medial piece, and have a better removeable insole. Some running stores still know it as the Beast. I guess they thought the name sounded a little more feminine for women.

Also, ask roadrunners to send you a free catalog.

Donna

'