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The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

Posted by susana on 11/30/00 at 02:59 (033846)

Hi,

I very thankful to have found your most informative site. It is interesting, although alarming to read about so many of you who have had trouble with TTS. It is nice to know I am not alone although not nice for any of you with this problem. If you are interested, here is what has happened to me in the last 6 months. Warning, a lengthy story (still ongoing), with a path winding through various Dr.'s and treatments, but that sounds like it's not uncommon after reading your posts.

THE STORY
I am 43 and have been very active at work and home and recreation(I was a field scientist). I also have had Multiple Sclerosis (MS) for 20 years and retired last January when the vision in my left eye was significantly compromised. HOwever, I have never been as disabled by MS or in as much pain as I have been with these various foot/ankle 'challenges'. Last June due to an over agressive walking program (to get back into shape after my 4 month MS attack), I was diagnosed with PTT (Posterior Tibial Tendonitis) in my left foot by an orthopedic ankle/foot surgeon who put a cast on it and then in a removable boot. I began to use crutches, but developed tendonitis in both wrists so I stopped and was very immobile. Then in July I started having pain in my right foot which I assumed was caused by shifting all my weight onto that foot from having the left one in a cast/boot. Nothing was done by the physician for that foot, other than having a rigid pair of orthotics (made by walking over a computer screen and imaged by weight), which were very painful. I was told to 'wean' into them, which I was never able to.

I also did 2 months of Physical Therapy starting in August, but got no better, and begain to have soreness in my right hip (sacro illiac joint area). The right foot was always more painful throughout all of these treatments. In September, I saw my regular internist for blood work to rule out rheumatoid diseases and I went to a Chiropractor (which I'd never done) who performed manipulatlive therapy, interferential therapy and a 2nd pair of soft orthotics (which seemed to help after a couple of weeks with little getting used to. However, because I still was not getting sifnificantly better, I sought another Physical Therapist who suggested a 3rd pair of thick rigid pair of orthotics. This pair seemed to aggravate the pain in the bottom of my right foot under the arch (kind of like a bruise) and up the side into the soft tissue area under the medial ankle bone. THe pain also goes up into my calf and my calf muscles are very tight, almost as though they prevent me from making a proper gait step.

I was then sent to my MS neurologist to check for RSD (Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy), which was negative thankfully. I had had this type of pain earlier, but it seemed to subside if I did some resting. The pain in my right foot and sacro illiac joint has gotten signicantly worse over the last 2 weeks. Stretching used to help and not bother me, however now it just starts the burning pain.

Today I returned to the orthopedic Dr.who made a possible (and probably likely) diagnosis of TTS. He gave me a cortisone injection to see if it helped over the next couple of days. I am being scheduled for an EMG in the next week or so and will also see the osteopath in the same practice, but not for another 2 weeks. The results of the EMG will determine whether or not a surgery will be emminent. Appointments with many specialists in this city (Denver) are difficult to get in right away.

The burning, aching, stabbing pain is often with little relief (using ibuprofen and ice), especially lately. I have major difficulties falling asleep, but usually don't wake up because of pain. I feel best in the morning, but after a little walking around, the pain comes right back. Shopping and recreational activity is very minimal, and I recently have been using a wheelchair to take some of the pressure off my feet. I started using Celebrex because of the stomach irritiation trouble. It also does not seem to help. I do not want to take stronger medication, and have it become a necessary part of my life if I can avoid it. This is undoubtedly the most frustarting and disheartening health problem I have ever had. Ihave tried every avenue I know of to get well, and have still not found satisfaction (a liveable level of discomfort) yet. It definitely makes one realize that you need to be part of your medical care, not everyone knows the answers.

MY TWO QUESTIONS:
1.) I am concerned about the success of surgery to relieve TTS after reading some of these posts. Does anyone have ideas about percentages of successes? I know they take time to heal - I'm already 6 months into it and just discovering what it may be. Any ideas on length of recovery and how close can one return to being functional as pre-injury

2.) I also wonder if this can be related to my hip, SIJ trouble, as the right foot seems some better if I can get my hip in a certain position. The sciatic nerve comes out of that area and then splits into the posterior tibial nerve, and so on...

Thank you for reading this. I wish you all the best in your journeys down the TTS Road.
Any insight will be appreciated.
Susana

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

Jeff D on 11/30/00 at 10:45 (033871)

Hi Susana
Sorry to hear of your foot troubles and if it's any comfort your not alone. You will find as you search and read, that the Diagnosis, Treatment and Prognosis of TTS is not encouraging. I have had my TTS for 2 1/2 years and have tried a number of things. I will attempt to outline my story for you and others.

July 98, first noticed that something wasn't right, jogging, walking and riding a bike made my right foot big toe go numb and my leg hurt. My first thought was that I had injured my foot water sking, to this day I still do not know what caused this except maybe improper stretching prior to exercising???
March 99 Went to a Sports Medicine MD, he thought that my foot and leg may be unrelated, tight hamstrings for the leg and a nerve problem in foot. He recommended stretchs for the leg.
July 99, Back to MD symptoms still there and I limited my activity, gaining weight. Progression of pain, big toe, ball of foot, sometimes ankle, lower inner leg bottom of knee inner. Doctor mentioned that it may be TTS and has only seen 3 cases. My pain and numbness seemed to be a little better so we held off from further treatment. It was better because I wasn't doing anything.
February 00, Foot still not better and simple walks bring on numbness and eventually pain. MD sent me for an EMG, results were negative.
May 00, Referred to a Orthopedic who specializes in the Foot and Ankle. Dr. Allan Grantr is highly recommended in the Detroit area. Dr. Grant took foot x-rays and found all to be normal but not convinced yet that I have TTS so suggested a wedge in my shoe to adjust my landing. I tried this for 6 weeks no help only worse.
July 00, desperate I went to a chriopractor. Of course he said the problem was in by back and did adjustments for two months with no improvement to my foot. I stopped the treatment.
August - November 00, went back to Orthopedic at urging of my MD. Dr. Grant still not positive of TTS but prescribed Celebrix for inflammation. I took this for one month and stopped it didn't help. He also prescribed Physical Theraphy for evaulation and theraphy. After 3 visits the PT believes that I do indeed have TTS and recommed a treatment plan that consists of whirlpool, massgae and stretching of the Tarsal Zone, phonophersis which is an ultra sound with a topical cortizone and foot and leg stretches. I started the PT in September and anm just now stopping the treatment.
November 00, I decided to go to a Podiatrist for a second opinion. The POD took x-rays and right away wanted to give me a nerve blocking injection and then proceed with surgery for TTS. He does not agree with the Physical Therapy and feels it may only be aggravating the Tarsal area. His quick jump to surgery scared me and I decided to go back to the Orthopedic Surgeon.
November 00, Dr Grant told me that he has performed many surgeries for TTS with about a 50/50 success rate. He did comment that in his experience patients with a negative EMG, which I had, have a higher success rate. He stilll would like to wait on surgery and wants me to continue my stretching at home and where shoes that help the pain. Shoes make a big difference for me.

Well that's where I'm at today and will most likely convince the Dr to do surgery within the next few months. I think that I have more confidence in the Orthopedic than the POD for this type surgery but that's only from my experience. If you want surgery it's easy to find someone who will do it, but who do you really trust. I only have it in one foot.

Good Luck

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

wendyn on 12/01/00 at 10:45 (033957)

I susana - I will try to give you some more detailed information as soon as a get a chance.

But - for now...

Please do not rush into any type of surgery. There is nothing to be gained by haste with this. The EMG is a good idea to do next. An MRI may also be helpful. It seems to be that if there is something compressing your nerve in the tunnel - they surgery has better odds. If there is no known cause for the pain and the problems, a simple release does not seem to have great results. My surgeon has refused to do it for me because the odds are less than 50 50 in my case that it would help. He believes my nerve is being stretched and a release could make it worse.

If you're in a lot of pain - has your doctor mentioned any drugs for neuropathy like Neurotonin? I would also make sure that they have checked your B12 levels to rule out a deficiency as a cause for your symptoms.

Please let us know how you do.

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

susana on 12/01/00 at 12:46 (033972)

Thanks so much for your responses. Wendyn, your comment about the nerve being stretched is interesting, I have thought this is what has been giving me so much trouble, tightness in my thigh, buttock, calf and sole of my foot, but these pieces haven't been put together in some sense or logical format and plan, I will keep on it.

Jeffd, your story is very familiar and equally frustrating. Shoes are a problem for me as well, I am starting to think that I am having slight collaspe in my arch which may be pushing on the Tibial Nerve. Perhaps minimal swelling in the area (caused by pain, shoes or other things) is enough to put pressusre on the nerve. It's very hard to stay off your feet, and this most certainly aggravates the condition.

I say to everyone, not only hang in there, but keep searching for possible answers and resolutions. Thanks,

Susana

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

Julie F on 12/01/00 at 14:24 (033982)

Susana, whatever you thought of the chiropractor you saw, it really could be coming from your back. You say it began with numbness, and if the pain is right down the back of your leg. Those are classic nerve impingement symptoms, so it might just make sense to try again with another chiro. These things can take longer than two months to sort themselves out.

Julie

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

Dr. Biehler on 12/04/00 at 09:47 (034132)

Posterior tibial tendonitis can start a cascade of problems as the body tries to compensate and protect that foot. All this can lead to a pinched nerve in the back that can show as all kind of nerve pain at any level below the point of compression. you can end up with several different problems as opposed to just one that is causing the pain. Dr. B.

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

Linda on 12/16/00 at 19:55 (035098)

Susana - Yours is the first story that sounds similar to the pain I am experiencing. 18 months ago I had pain in my left buttock where the sciatic nerve attached and a tingling in my right foot. I was seeing a chiropractor for nect pain and I am suspicious he was the cause of my new problem. A MRI showed that I had herniated disks and I was treated by a Physical Theraphist for this. ( this is the shortened version of all the doctors and treatment I went through) Last spring a 2nd MRI showed that the disks were healed but the pain in my butt/hips, especially where the sciatic neve attache, and down both legs and in both feet was getting worse. Finally one doctor did a nerve conduction test and decided the foot pain was TTS and plantars facisitis. She ordered my PT for the leg and butt/hip pain but it did nothing. The doctor finally decided it might be fibromyalgia. I am now paying for massage theraphy which has done woners for the hip and leg pain. Also taking some herbal remedies. From the knees up I feel like a normal person.
I now am trying to figure out what to do about the TTS. I still think it is somehow connected to the hip and leg pain even though 2 podiatrist pooh-pooh that notion. I am especially interested in the theory that it might be stretched rather than pinched. The massage theraphist says I have extremely tight hamstrings and musculature.
I have orthodics and when I switched to them they worsen the TTS and I can't even get back to my pre-orthodic state. I have gotten used to them and they help some. I have had 2 cortisone shots and a third is scheduled in 2 days. Also I am taking Celebrix.
The questions I have for my next visit and for anyone who has an opinion are:
1. Can this new procedure using sound waves to heal tennis elbow and plantars facisitis help TTS? There has been a lot in the news on this.

2. When I stay off my feet they feel better. Is there some healing going on? Or, will they go back as soon as I do any walking?

3. Can a night splint help. I have put my Berkinstock sandals on in bed when the pain gets bad. They support the blankets and seem to brace my feet.
4. Has anyone found surgery helpful. I have heard of no success stories.

Sorry this is so long but like all of you this is driving me crazy and I want my life back.
Linda

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

wendyn on 12/17/00 at 09:32 (035109)

Linda - sorry to hear you're having such a rough time. Unfourtunately your story and experiences sound all too familiar. Like Dr Z said on another board - ESWT is not indicated for cases of TTS so it will not be your answer.

Go easy with the cortisone - is it helping? If so, maybe one more shot is a good idea - if not, why continue?

Staying off the feet seems to always help. My best laymans guess is because when you stand, feet have a tendancy to swell and accumulate fluid as the day goes on. This is why people are told to buy shoes at the end of the day when their feet are slightly larger. This swelling and fluid puts extra pressure on the nerves and Tarsal Tunnel area and makes the pain worse.

I have not tried a night splint - I am the one who has been diagnosed with the stretched nerve. I would suspect that in my case it may make me worse. Your negative experience with orthotics also sounds familiar.

What is your normal activity level like right now?

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

Linda on 12/17/00 at 14:32 (035123)

To answer your question: Right now I do all right around the house - relatively speaking. I can sit when needed or change shoes. I teach computers part time in an elementary school and I can just make it to the end of the day, again I try to alternate between sitting and standing. But I am in a lot of pain by the time I walk to my car. My biggest problem is with walking. I have only made short trips to the mall this season and that was to only go to one store possibly 2. I felt elation on Friday because I made it through the grocery store and a 45 minute wait in line ( snow was expected!). The waiting wasn't too bad but the ankle pain flared up as I walked to the car.
I have been swimming 2 times a week for the past year. I started because of my leg and hip pain. I have kept it up even though it bothers my feet to a certain degree. I always feel better and more energized by the time I get home so I think it is worth it. This past week I gingerly tried to use one of those Lifecycle bikes that has a back on it. I started with 10 minutes at Level 1. Today I made it up to 15 minutes. My feet actually felt a little better when I was done. I am trying to get the circulation going. I think leaning back in the seat and not having to use much pressure is the key.
Reading some of these posts is a little discouraging. I would like to know how many people really recover from TTS and can it be done without surgery. I am afraid when the weather gets better and I want to be more active that I will find that I have made no improvement.
Thanks for responding to my post. Linda

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

wendyn on 12/17/00 at 18:59 (035132)

Linda - sounds like you and I are kind of along the same track right now. For the swimming - you may want to try putting your feet and ankles into an ankle brace so they don't move in the pool. Futuro makes a stretchy kind that will give you some support. Also - you may want to try putting a flotation block in between your feet and swimming using your upper body only - dragging your feet behind. This would give you one heck of a cardio work out.

Your experience with the bike is identical to mine - just take it slow, work up in smalle increments - just a minute or two more at a time. Increase your rpm slowly too - I started with about 50 rpm and I'm now at about 80. Stretch carefully afterwards - like you I usually notice how much better I feel after the bike.

I have no 'cure' or positive surgery stories to offer you - I take one day at a time myself. Sounds to me like you are on the right track - keep doing what you're doing and let us know how it goes!

Re: Swimming...

Barbara TX on 12/18/00 at 12:16 (035150)

Wendy - this kind of swimming really is a workout...since only one of my feet is really sensitive to swimming, I usually breastroke for awhile kicking only one foot, but those nifty floats come in handy when I want to rest both feet. I have even gotten to the point where I don't even need the floats, and i just drag my feet along. Of course, I worry that the whole bottom half of my both will wither and the upper half will be overdeveloped. That would make for a weird figure... B.

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

tcjoyful1 on 1/06/01 at 19:47 (036050)

Linda -
In response to #4 I had surgery on my right foot for TTS in June of 2000. It took until November, but I have had pleasing results. Like I said, it took several months, but now the foot gives me little trouble. The biggest problem that I've experienced is I now have TTS in my left foot also. I am working on avoiding surgery on it.

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

Jeff D on 11/30/00 at 10:45 (033871)

Hi Susana
Sorry to hear of your foot troubles and if it's any comfort your not alone. You will find as you search and read, that the Diagnosis, Treatment and Prognosis of TTS is not encouraging. I have had my TTS for 2 1/2 years and have tried a number of things. I will attempt to outline my story for you and others.

July 98, first noticed that something wasn't right, jogging, walking and riding a bike made my right foot big toe go numb and my leg hurt. My first thought was that I had injured my foot water sking, to this day I still do not know what caused this except maybe improper stretching prior to exercising???
March 99 Went to a Sports Medicine MD, he thought that my foot and leg may be unrelated, tight hamstrings for the leg and a nerve problem in foot. He recommended stretchs for the leg.
July 99, Back to MD symptoms still there and I limited my activity, gaining weight. Progression of pain, big toe, ball of foot, sometimes ankle, lower inner leg bottom of knee inner. Doctor mentioned that it may be TTS and has only seen 3 cases. My pain and numbness seemed to be a little better so we held off from further treatment. It was better because I wasn't doing anything.
February 00, Foot still not better and simple walks bring on numbness and eventually pain. MD sent me for an EMG, results were negative.
May 00, Referred to a Orthopedic who specializes in the Foot and Ankle. Dr. Allan Grantr is highly recommended in the Detroit area. Dr. Grant took foot x-rays and found all to be normal but not convinced yet that I have TTS so suggested a wedge in my shoe to adjust my landing. I tried this for 6 weeks no help only worse.
July 00, desperate I went to a chriopractor. Of course he said the problem was in by back and did adjustments for two months with no improvement to my foot. I stopped the treatment.
August - November 00, went back to Orthopedic at urging of my MD. Dr. Grant still not positive of TTS but prescribed Celebrix for inflammation. I took this for one month and stopped it didn't help. He also prescribed Physical Theraphy for evaulation and theraphy. After 3 visits the PT believes that I do indeed have TTS and recommed a treatment plan that consists of whirlpool, massgae and stretching of the Tarsal Zone, phonophersis which is an ultra sound with a topical cortizone and foot and leg stretches. I started the PT in September and anm just now stopping the treatment.
November 00, I decided to go to a Podiatrist for a second opinion. The POD took x-rays and right away wanted to give me a nerve blocking injection and then proceed with surgery for TTS. He does not agree with the Physical Therapy and feels it may only be aggravating the Tarsal area. His quick jump to surgery scared me and I decided to go back to the Orthopedic Surgeon.
November 00, Dr Grant told me that he has performed many surgeries for TTS with about a 50/50 success rate. He did comment that in his experience patients with a negative EMG, which I had, have a higher success rate. He stilll would like to wait on surgery and wants me to continue my stretching at home and where shoes that help the pain. Shoes make a big difference for me.

Well that's where I'm at today and will most likely convince the Dr to do surgery within the next few months. I think that I have more confidence in the Orthopedic than the POD for this type surgery but that's only from my experience. If you want surgery it's easy to find someone who will do it, but who do you really trust. I only have it in one foot.

Good Luck

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

wendyn on 12/01/00 at 10:45 (033957)

I susana - I will try to give you some more detailed information as soon as a get a chance.

But - for now...

Please do not rush into any type of surgery. There is nothing to be gained by haste with this. The EMG is a good idea to do next. An MRI may also be helpful. It seems to be that if there is something compressing your nerve in the tunnel - they surgery has better odds. If there is no known cause for the pain and the problems, a simple release does not seem to have great results. My surgeon has refused to do it for me because the odds are less than 50 50 in my case that it would help. He believes my nerve is being stretched and a release could make it worse.

If you're in a lot of pain - has your doctor mentioned any drugs for neuropathy like Neurotonin? I would also make sure that they have checked your B12 levels to rule out a deficiency as a cause for your symptoms.

Please let us know how you do.

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

susana on 12/01/00 at 12:46 (033972)

Thanks so much for your responses. Wendyn, your comment about the nerve being stretched is interesting, I have thought this is what has been giving me so much trouble, tightness in my thigh, buttock, calf and sole of my foot, but these pieces haven't been put together in some sense or logical format and plan, I will keep on it.

Jeffd, your story is very familiar and equally frustrating. Shoes are a problem for me as well, I am starting to think that I am having slight collaspe in my arch which may be pushing on the Tibial Nerve. Perhaps minimal swelling in the area (caused by pain, shoes or other things) is enough to put pressusre on the nerve. It's very hard to stay off your feet, and this most certainly aggravates the condition.

I say to everyone, not only hang in there, but keep searching for possible answers and resolutions. Thanks,

Susana

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

Julie F on 12/01/00 at 14:24 (033982)

Susana, whatever you thought of the chiropractor you saw, it really could be coming from your back. You say it began with numbness, and if the pain is right down the back of your leg. Those are classic nerve impingement symptoms, so it might just make sense to try again with another chiro. These things can take longer than two months to sort themselves out.

Julie

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

Dr. Biehler on 12/04/00 at 09:47 (034132)

Posterior tibial tendonitis can start a cascade of problems as the body tries to compensate and protect that foot. All this can lead to a pinched nerve in the back that can show as all kind of nerve pain at any level below the point of compression. you can end up with several different problems as opposed to just one that is causing the pain. Dr. B.

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

Linda on 12/16/00 at 19:55 (035098)

Susana - Yours is the first story that sounds similar to the pain I am experiencing. 18 months ago I had pain in my left buttock where the sciatic nerve attached and a tingling in my right foot. I was seeing a chiropractor for nect pain and I am suspicious he was the cause of my new problem. A MRI showed that I had herniated disks and I was treated by a Physical Theraphist for this. ( this is the shortened version of all the doctors and treatment I went through) Last spring a 2nd MRI showed that the disks were healed but the pain in my butt/hips, especially where the sciatic neve attache, and down both legs and in both feet was getting worse. Finally one doctor did a nerve conduction test and decided the foot pain was TTS and plantars facisitis. She ordered my PT for the leg and butt/hip pain but it did nothing. The doctor finally decided it might be fibromyalgia. I am now paying for massage theraphy which has done woners for the hip and leg pain. Also taking some herbal remedies. From the knees up I feel like a normal person.
I now am trying to figure out what to do about the TTS. I still think it is somehow connected to the hip and leg pain even though 2 podiatrist pooh-pooh that notion. I am especially interested in the theory that it might be stretched rather than pinched. The massage theraphist says I have extremely tight hamstrings and musculature.
I have orthodics and when I switched to them they worsen the TTS and I can't even get back to my pre-orthodic state. I have gotten used to them and they help some. I have had 2 cortisone shots and a third is scheduled in 2 days. Also I am taking Celebrix.
The questions I have for my next visit and for anyone who has an opinion are:
1. Can this new procedure using sound waves to heal tennis elbow and plantars facisitis help TTS? There has been a lot in the news on this.

2. When I stay off my feet they feel better. Is there some healing going on? Or, will they go back as soon as I do any walking?

3. Can a night splint help. I have put my Berkinstock sandals on in bed when the pain gets bad. They support the blankets and seem to brace my feet.
4. Has anyone found surgery helpful. I have heard of no success stories.

Sorry this is so long but like all of you this is driving me crazy and I want my life back.
Linda

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

wendyn on 12/17/00 at 09:32 (035109)

Linda - sorry to hear you're having such a rough time. Unfourtunately your story and experiences sound all too familiar. Like Dr Z said on another board - ESWT is not indicated for cases of TTS so it will not be your answer.

Go easy with the cortisone - is it helping? If so, maybe one more shot is a good idea - if not, why continue?

Staying off the feet seems to always help. My best laymans guess is because when you stand, feet have a tendancy to swell and accumulate fluid as the day goes on. This is why people are told to buy shoes at the end of the day when their feet are slightly larger. This swelling and fluid puts extra pressure on the nerves and Tarsal Tunnel area and makes the pain worse.

I have not tried a night splint - I am the one who has been diagnosed with the stretched nerve. I would suspect that in my case it may make me worse. Your negative experience with orthotics also sounds familiar.

What is your normal activity level like right now?

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

Linda on 12/17/00 at 14:32 (035123)

To answer your question: Right now I do all right around the house - relatively speaking. I can sit when needed or change shoes. I teach computers part time in an elementary school and I can just make it to the end of the day, again I try to alternate between sitting and standing. But I am in a lot of pain by the time I walk to my car. My biggest problem is with walking. I have only made short trips to the mall this season and that was to only go to one store possibly 2. I felt elation on Friday because I made it through the grocery store and a 45 minute wait in line ( snow was expected!). The waiting wasn't too bad but the ankle pain flared up as I walked to the car.
I have been swimming 2 times a week for the past year. I started because of my leg and hip pain. I have kept it up even though it bothers my feet to a certain degree. I always feel better and more energized by the time I get home so I think it is worth it. This past week I gingerly tried to use one of those Lifecycle bikes that has a back on it. I started with 10 minutes at Level 1. Today I made it up to 15 minutes. My feet actually felt a little better when I was done. I am trying to get the circulation going. I think leaning back in the seat and not having to use much pressure is the key.
Reading some of these posts is a little discouraging. I would like to know how many people really recover from TTS and can it be done without surgery. I am afraid when the weather gets better and I want to be more active that I will find that I have made no improvement.
Thanks for responding to my post. Linda

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

wendyn on 12/17/00 at 18:59 (035132)

Linda - sounds like you and I are kind of along the same track right now. For the swimming - you may want to try putting your feet and ankles into an ankle brace so they don't move in the pool. Futuro makes a stretchy kind that will give you some support. Also - you may want to try putting a flotation block in between your feet and swimming using your upper body only - dragging your feet behind. This would give you one heck of a cardio work out.

Your experience with the bike is identical to mine - just take it slow, work up in smalle increments - just a minute or two more at a time. Increase your rpm slowly too - I started with about 50 rpm and I'm now at about 80. Stretch carefully afterwards - like you I usually notice how much better I feel after the bike.

I have no 'cure' or positive surgery stories to offer you - I take one day at a time myself. Sounds to me like you are on the right track - keep doing what you're doing and let us know how it goes!

Re: Swimming...

Barbara TX on 12/18/00 at 12:16 (035150)

Wendy - this kind of swimming really is a workout...since only one of my feet is really sensitive to swimming, I usually breastroke for awhile kicking only one foot, but those nifty floats come in handy when I want to rest both feet. I have even gotten to the point where I don't even need the floats, and i just drag my feet along. Of course, I worry that the whole bottom half of my both will wither and the upper half will be overdeveloped. That would make for a weird figure... B.

Re: The Story, and Questions for a Possible TTS Diagnosis

tcjoyful1 on 1/06/01 at 19:47 (036050)

Linda -
In response to #4 I had surgery on my right foot for TTS in June of 2000. It took until November, but I have had pleasing results. Like I said, it took several months, but now the foot gives me little trouble. The biggest problem that I've experienced is I now have TTS in my left foot also. I am working on avoiding surgery on it.