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Kate: I need Dr. Z's address to mail MRI report

Posted by Beverly on 11/30/00 at 12:52 (033883)

Hi Kate,

I'd like my MRI report to be waiting for Dr. Z. when he gets home from vacation. Could you give me his address? All my MRI showed was inflammation/a little endema in the foot. It did not show anything bad on the ankle, but both my ortho guy and PT agree that I have some PTT, because I have inner ankle pain on walking and some squishy to the touch in the tendons. I am still interested in EWST. From what I gather from Dr. Z., PTT does not knock me out of the running, but makes it harder to deal with. I am getting orthodics. I hope that helps clear up the PTT.
Thanks,
Beverly

PS: How much does it cost to do both feet?

Re: Kate: I need Dr. Z's address to mail MRI report

Kay S on 11/30/00 at 19:44 (033905)

Beverly--I know Kate will respond, but you can find the address yourself by playing around on the Home page. I couldn't remember which thing I clicked on, but there is a picture of Dr. Z and an address at the bottom. And they also have a fax number if you just want to fax the report (if you have it)
The other thing--about the cost. I think when I was deciding to do it was the last time Dr. Z. talked about the amount, but he said 2500. for one foot and 3000. for both and that includes any further treatments you might need. I have done a lot of research into the cost and believe me, this is a good price. And Dr. Z has done as many as anyone else in the US as far as I could tell, so it is not like we are not getting the best care. If it helps it will be well worth the price.
Keep us informed!
Kay

Re: Kate: I need Dr. Z's address to mail MRI report

Dr. Zuckerman on 12/01/00 at 08:10 (033947)

My address is 341 South Evergreem Ave
Woodbury, New Jersey 08096

Fax : 1-856-848-5122

French address

Monsier Zuckerman

100th Floor

Top of the Eiffel Tower

Paris, France

'

Re: And he even has a sense of humor! MRI notes..

Beverly on 12/01/00 at 15:50 (033996)

Dr. Z,

You are a hoot giving your French address as the top of the Eiffel Tower.
My MRI only showed inflammation/slight endema in the foot. It did not detect anything in the ankle, but both my PT and PA agree that I have PTT. They just don't think it is bad enough to be showing up on the MRI.
No fractures and no tumors.
The only other thing that is weird is that my PT keeps noticing that when I am sitting, my legs get reddish in a vascular way, and as soon as I elevate them, they look normal again. I mean within seconds. But I showed this to the Physicians Assist at the Sports Doc's office, and he didn't think it was anything out of the ordinary. For all I know, my legs have done that for years, and I just never noticed it before. I've never had great circulation, but nor have I ever had a clot. It happens equally on both calves/lower leg area. But any walking or elevation takes it back to normal color.

My hamstring strain/tear is slightly better since I've been using heat more than ice.
Have a great trip,
Beverly

Re: And he even has a sense of humor! MRI notes..

Dr. Zuckerman on 12/02/00 at 04:07 (034034)

One of the most important testing for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction testing is to have the doctor place the foot in a plantarflexed supinated positon just like it would be if it were function during the gait cycle. You then have the patient push against resistance. The doctor then will run his hand along the course of the post tib tendon. If there is pain this is one of the clinical methods to detemine if there is a problem

He or she can watch you walk and look at the function of the post tib tendon. Is there clinical swelling and pain on physical examination. There is also a possiblity if the above clinical evaluation are positive that the cuts of the mri missed the pathology. of the post tib. tendon

Re: He did some of that but not like your instructions

Beverly on 12/03/00 at 14:30 (034099)

The PA did some of that but not exactly as you've described. He held my feet in his hands and had me push various directions. At the time, he seemed to be using this to determine any involvement of the back, because his pain questions were directed in regards to the back. His conclusion was that this was not coming from my back. He felt my ankle for tenderness but NOT at the same time I was pushing my foot in his hand. They were two separate points of the exam.

I will get my physical therapist to duplicate what you've described and I'll tell you what we discover.

But I do know this much. Whenever my physical therapist gives me a massage to the PTT, it is always tender. Sometimes he can go deep and it's just tender. Sometimes if he goes deep, it is a big ouch! Depends upon the day.
But overall, my ankles are not as sore as much as they used to be, and my hamstring strain is definitely better. But the foot pain in the heel, arch, instep and inner ankle on weight bearing has remained painful. Some days are not so bad and other days are horrible.

There is very little visible swelling anywhere. Just a scant amount at the lowest portion of the PTT on the left foot.
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: Kate: I need Dr. Z's address to mail MRI report

Kate on 12/04/00 at 08:01 (034126)

Bev,
You can find us at......
341 South Evergreen Avenue
Woodbury New Jersey 08096

Kate

Re: Kate: I need Dr. Z's address to mail MRI report

Kay S on 11/30/00 at 19:44 (033905)

Beverly--I know Kate will respond, but you can find the address yourself by playing around on the Home page. I couldn't remember which thing I clicked on, but there is a picture of Dr. Z and an address at the bottom. And they also have a fax number if you just want to fax the report (if you have it)
The other thing--about the cost. I think when I was deciding to do it was the last time Dr. Z. talked about the amount, but he said 2500. for one foot and 3000. for both and that includes any further treatments you might need. I have done a lot of research into the cost and believe me, this is a good price. And Dr. Z has done as many as anyone else in the US as far as I could tell, so it is not like we are not getting the best care. If it helps it will be well worth the price.
Keep us informed!
Kay

Re: Kate: I need Dr. Z's address to mail MRI report

Dr. Zuckerman on 12/01/00 at 08:10 (033947)

My address is 341 South Evergreem Ave
Woodbury, New Jersey 08096

Fax : 1-856-848-5122

French address

Monsier Zuckerman

100th Floor

Top of the Eiffel Tower

Paris, France

'

Re: And he even has a sense of humor! MRI notes..

Beverly on 12/01/00 at 15:50 (033996)

Dr. Z,

You are a hoot giving your French address as the top of the Eiffel Tower.
My MRI only showed inflammation/slight endema in the foot. It did not detect anything in the ankle, but both my PT and PA agree that I have PTT. They just don't think it is bad enough to be showing up on the MRI.
No fractures and no tumors.
The only other thing that is weird is that my PT keeps noticing that when I am sitting, my legs get reddish in a vascular way, and as soon as I elevate them, they look normal again. I mean within seconds. But I showed this to the Physicians Assist at the Sports Doc's office, and he didn't think it was anything out of the ordinary. For all I know, my legs have done that for years, and I just never noticed it before. I've never had great circulation, but nor have I ever had a clot. It happens equally on both calves/lower leg area. But any walking or elevation takes it back to normal color.

My hamstring strain/tear is slightly better since I've been using heat more than ice.
Have a great trip,
Beverly

Re: And he even has a sense of humor! MRI notes..

Dr. Zuckerman on 12/02/00 at 04:07 (034034)

One of the most important testing for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction testing is to have the doctor place the foot in a plantarflexed supinated positon just like it would be if it were function during the gait cycle. You then have the patient push against resistance. The doctor then will run his hand along the course of the post tib tendon. If there is pain this is one of the clinical methods to detemine if there is a problem

He or she can watch you walk and look at the function of the post tib tendon. Is there clinical swelling and pain on physical examination. There is also a possiblity if the above clinical evaluation are positive that the cuts of the mri missed the pathology. of the post tib. tendon

Re: He did some of that but not like your instructions

Beverly on 12/03/00 at 14:30 (034099)

The PA did some of that but not exactly as you've described. He held my feet in his hands and had me push various directions. At the time, he seemed to be using this to determine any involvement of the back, because his pain questions were directed in regards to the back. His conclusion was that this was not coming from my back. He felt my ankle for tenderness but NOT at the same time I was pushing my foot in his hand. They were two separate points of the exam.

I will get my physical therapist to duplicate what you've described and I'll tell you what we discover.

But I do know this much. Whenever my physical therapist gives me a massage to the PTT, it is always tender. Sometimes he can go deep and it's just tender. Sometimes if he goes deep, it is a big ouch! Depends upon the day.
But overall, my ankles are not as sore as much as they used to be, and my hamstring strain is definitely better. But the foot pain in the heel, arch, instep and inner ankle on weight bearing has remained painful. Some days are not so bad and other days are horrible.

There is very little visible swelling anywhere. Just a scant amount at the lowest portion of the PTT on the left foot.
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: Kate: I need Dr. Z's address to mail MRI report

Kate on 12/04/00 at 08:01 (034126)

Bev,
You can find us at......
341 South Evergreen Avenue
Woodbury New Jersey 08096

Kate