Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Taping

Posted by Jacqui M. on 12/14/00 at 15:28 (034956)

Hello, I am a physical therapist and was curious about your 2 strip taping technique for Planter Fasciitis. How tight would you want the tape to be(in one picture it looks as if the tape is pulled tight enough that it creates a bridge between the ball of the foot and the heel, in the other picture it looks as if the tape stays with the skin). Also do you use any landmarks for where the tape is placed? Would you use the taping method with only excess pronation, (what would you do for over supination causing pain). Finally, if part of the cause for a heel spur is excessive pulling (stretching) of the fascia, could stretching of the fascia (as you suggested in your article) be detrimental?

Your site is great, I have my first heelspur patient and this is very helpful. Thank you.

Re: Taping

Dr. Zuckerman on 12/14/00 at 19:46 (034968)

I believe that the taping your are talking about was done by Scott Roberts, our web site master and founder of our great informative site.
So give him a message and he will come out. Taping is an excellent method
for the relief for heel spur and or plantar fascia foot pain. I like the classic low dye strapping. The purpose of all taping is to place the foot in a neutral position and the reduction of excessive pronation. Pronation is good for the foot and is needed for the gait cycle . Excessive pronation is abnormal so we try to eliminate or reduce this. Take a look at mike wilmott personal foot trainer. They could be a great addition to your practice. how do you like the online heel pain book by Scott Roberts.

We should put this in every heel pain office in the world

Re: Taping

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 02:56 (034989)

Hi, Jacqui

I'm not answering for Scott (and in fact am looking forward to his response too) but I'm a devotee of his simple two-strip method, which I've used for some months now, so my observations may be useful.

I think the picture of the tape 'bridging' the ball and the heel is showing how it looks while it is being applied and immediately after (at least this what happens when I apply tape) - i.e.the foot is dorsiflexed and the tape is put on fairly tightly. At that point there is a space between the tape and the foot which disappears when the foot is back in neutral and the tape adheres to the arch. (Once you start walking and your orthotic or support or whatever connects with the arch, the 'space' would disappear anyway.)

I started using this method after a couple of weeks of being taped by my podiatrist. His excellent and very supportive method was complex, involving several thin strips of tape applied in a figure 8 from little toe around heel to big toe, followed by several strips applied laterally all along the length of the foot, and finally some wider strips all around the sides of the foot. He is podiatrist to two football teams, so this is probably the method he uses when his PF footballers have to get out onto the pitch! It was great, but to make the most of my 'investment' I had to keep it on for a week, the plastic bag I put my foot in to shower never kept the water out, and I had to dry the tape off with my hair dryer - you get the idea.

Scott's simple method gives almost as much support and relief, with the great advantage that it can be taken off every night and reapplied next morning. When I first read that section of the PF Book I was intrigued by his description of taping as the 'best means of resting the fascia' - it was heartening to discover that taping does not just relieve pain, but, by 'resting' the fascia, contributes to healing.

Two-strip taping plus an elastic ankle brace if I'm going to be on my feet a lot gives me all the support I need.

You say you have your first heel spur patient - I take it you're a podiatrist? Whatever, I know you'll find this site a great help in your work. We all learn a lot from it, and from one another. My pod introduced me the other day to his colleague (somewhat grudgingly, I think) as 'the UK expert on plantar fasciitis'.

All the best, Julie

Re: Taping - addendum

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 06:12 (034995)

Jacqui, I didn't make that entirely clear. I keep my foot dorsiflexed while I apply the tape because I don't want the tape to be too tight, as it would be if I applied it with the foot in neutral. If you want the tape tighter, you keep the foot in neutral. But whatever position the foot is held in, there is a space between the tape and the foot while the tape is being applied - because the tape is under tension (and therefore in a straight line) and the arch is a curve.

I don't use markers - I just place the tape over the ball, close to the toes, and then place it so that it just curves over the back of the heel (as shown in the photo).

If the foot is in neutral while the tape is applied, you have to dorsiflex while covering the heel to stretch the skin, otherwise the tape can 'catch' the skinfolds and cause irritation.

Julie

Re: Taping

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 06:15 (034996)

Sorry Jacqui - you did say: you're a physical therapist.

Re: Taping

Dr. Zuckerman on 12/14/00 at 19:46 (034968)

I believe that the taping your are talking about was done by Scott Roberts, our web site master and founder of our great informative site.
So give him a message and he will come out. Taping is an excellent method
for the relief for heel spur and or plantar fascia foot pain. I like the classic low dye strapping. The purpose of all taping is to place the foot in a neutral position and the reduction of excessive pronation. Pronation is good for the foot and is needed for the gait cycle . Excessive pronation is abnormal so we try to eliminate or reduce this. Take a look at mike wilmott personal foot trainer. They could be a great addition to your practice. how do you like the online heel pain book by Scott Roberts.

We should put this in every heel pain office in the world

Re: Taping

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 02:56 (034989)

Hi, Jacqui

I'm not answering for Scott (and in fact am looking forward to his response too) but I'm a devotee of his simple two-strip method, which I've used for some months now, so my observations may be useful.

I think the picture of the tape 'bridging' the ball and the heel is showing how it looks while it is being applied and immediately after (at least this what happens when I apply tape) - i.e.the foot is dorsiflexed and the tape is put on fairly tightly. At that point there is a space between the tape and the foot which disappears when the foot is back in neutral and the tape adheres to the arch. (Once you start walking and your orthotic or support or whatever connects with the arch, the 'space' would disappear anyway.)

I started using this method after a couple of weeks of being taped by my podiatrist. His excellent and very supportive method was complex, involving several thin strips of tape applied in a figure 8 from little toe around heel to big toe, followed by several strips applied laterally all along the length of the foot, and finally some wider strips all around the sides of the foot. He is podiatrist to two football teams, so this is probably the method he uses when his PF footballers have to get out onto the pitch! It was great, but to make the most of my 'investment' I had to keep it on for a week, the plastic bag I put my foot in to shower never kept the water out, and I had to dry the tape off with my hair dryer - you get the idea.

Scott's simple method gives almost as much support and relief, with the great advantage that it can be taken off every night and reapplied next morning. When I first read that section of the PF Book I was intrigued by his description of taping as the 'best means of resting the fascia' - it was heartening to discover that taping does not just relieve pain, but, by 'resting' the fascia, contributes to healing.

Two-strip taping plus an elastic ankle brace if I'm going to be on my feet a lot gives me all the support I need.

You say you have your first heel spur patient - I take it you're a podiatrist? Whatever, I know you'll find this site a great help in your work. We all learn a lot from it, and from one another. My pod introduced me the other day to his colleague (somewhat grudgingly, I think) as 'the UK expert on plantar fasciitis'.

All the best, Julie

Re: Taping - addendum

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 06:12 (034995)

Jacqui, I didn't make that entirely clear. I keep my foot dorsiflexed while I apply the tape because I don't want the tape to be too tight, as it would be if I applied it with the foot in neutral. If you want the tape tighter, you keep the foot in neutral. But whatever position the foot is held in, there is a space between the tape and the foot while the tape is being applied - because the tape is under tension (and therefore in a straight line) and the arch is a curve.

I don't use markers - I just place the tape over the ball, close to the toes, and then place it so that it just curves over the back of the heel (as shown in the photo).

If the foot is in neutral while the tape is applied, you have to dorsiflex while covering the heel to stretch the skin, otherwise the tape can 'catch' the skinfolds and cause irritation.

Julie

Re: Taping

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 06:15 (034996)

Sorry Jacqui - you did say: you're a physical therapist.