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Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Posted by Julie F on 12/15/00 at 06:26 (034997)

Hi everyone

I had a brain wave while reading Dr Z's reply to my question (on the Doctor's board) about why bleeding aids healing. It struck me that poor circulation in the extremities might be a factor in prone-ness to PF: i.e. that if the fascia, over time, doesn't have an optimum blood supply, it might be more likely, given other pre-disposing factors, to detach.

So it occurred to me that it would be interesting to know if more of us PF sufferers are cold-footed people.

I am (as my husband will gladly confirm). What about you? Are your feet normally warm, or normally cold? (I'm not talking about how feet in Birkenstocks feel in extremes of temperature, Wendy, or about how feet feel after a long hike in summer - I mean under normal conditions.)

We could get a statistically significant result only if this were a research question (Scott, would you like to post it as one or does it just seem a silly idea?) Meanwhile we could get some idea from the regular posters....anyway, I would really be interested to know if there is a possible connection.

Look forward to your replies.

All the best, Julie

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Nancy S. on 12/15/00 at 07:12 (035000)

Julie, you had a 'brain wave'? I love it. Now, do we get those in the States, or is it strictly a U.K. phenomenon? Or are you the only person in the world who has one?

On to your question: I'm definitely a cold-footed person. For many years I've worn nothing like sandals in the summer -- I wear running or hiking shoes, with socks, no matter what the temperature out. I wear socks at all times, including to bed. I've even been known to wear them to bed in midsummer, including during a heat wave.
Since it's gotten cold here in Maine, this year a few people have commented to me, now that I'm having to wear my orthotics inside Birkenstock Tatamis sandals: 'Why on earth, when you practically wear combat boots when it's 90 degrees out, are you wearing sandals now that it's 10 degrees out?'
Nancy

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 08:18 (035009)

Now, Nancy, I'm trying to think back, way, way back into the dim distant past. Seems to me I remember having the occasional brain wave at Antioch and even before, and that my friends sometimes had them too. So brain waves aren't exclusively British. But maybe they're historical, and you don't get them in the States any more.

So. Back to business. We now have a sample of two cold feet (no, four). Not a statistically significant sample, but very interesting. Hope we get some more input.

How _are_ you getting on in your Birks in freezing Maine?

Julie

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

wendyn on 12/15/00 at 08:20 (035011)

The circulation issue has come up before and I think it's an important one. If you push on your foot your finger will leave a white spot. Count how many seconds it takes to go away - this is called capillary refill. I believe it should take less than 3 seconds, mine sometimes will take 8 or 9 in my feet.

Someone said before that their doctor told them hair growth on feet is a sign of GOOD circulation. I am living proof this is not the case. I have lousy circulation, and hairy toes (if I don't wax them) now - isn't that a pretty picture first thing in the morning!

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Nancy N on 12/15/00 at 12:39 (035023)

Interesting question! I think you'd definitely call my mom cold-footed--she always wears full shoes, socks at the very least, even in the summer. Makes me warm just looking at her--I guess that makes me warm-footed! I almost always go barefoot at home (I know, I know, but I can't bear not to, and until/unless I stop getting better, I'll still rebel!), though lately, my house has been cold enough that I've had to dig out my Grinch slipper-socks--you know it's cold when I do that!

On sort of a side note, I was at Linens N'Things the other night and saw that Earth Therapeutics has a new foot-warmer available. It looks like a sock (I think--I didn't open the whole thing up) with a gel pack (it looks sort of like the eye packs you put in the freezer for your face). I assume you put the gel pack in the microwave and then stick it into the sock, which I think has a pocket to hold it so it's not directly against your skin. The package mentioned that cold feet can mess up all sorts of other body functions, though I don't remember what they were. I thought it was interesting, though. If anybody has trouble keeping their feet warm, it might be something worth checking out. (Maybe it would be a good Christmas gift!)

Re: Re:Nancy - No Bare Feet!

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 12:53 (035027)

Oh, Nancy, please, PLEASE stop going barefoot. I'm sure you will get better much, much more quickly if you wear shoes with good arch supports all the time. Won't she, Drs B & Z?? (please support me here!) It was the first important thing I learned about PF, and although I take it for granted now, I am sure it has helped more than almost anything else. NO BARE FEET!!!!

Sorry. I know you know, and have made your own decision about this, but please reconsider.

End of lecture.

All the best, Julie

Re: To Amy

Barbara TX on 12/15/00 at 14:12 (035030)

Amy - what are chiliblains? I am from Texas, but I don't suspect they have anything to do with chili! B.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Barbara TX on 12/15/00 at 14:21 (035031)

I am definately cold-footed - even when I was a teenager, my calves had a tendency to be mottled if I sat in school for long periods of time. When I was my most acute, my feet were freezing and nothing could warm them up. I find that my feet are frequently cold and I massage them lots and try to move around. I figure more circulation, more blood exchange = more healing. B.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Beverly on 12/15/00 at 14:45 (035032)

Me too. Definitely, beyond question, I am cold footed. And all my ex's would confirm that! All my life, I've heard things like, 'Get those freezing cold feet off me.'

This is an interesting trend. So far, all of us who have replied are cold feet people.

My circulation is bad enough that I can't sit for more than an hour before my calves get achey. I've been that way for years. I had superficial phebitis (inflammation but no clot) twice during grad school from writing papers round'-the-clock without taking enough breaks. I've learned to get up and walk around every hour on the computer. I do that even with 'hurtie' feet. I figure 'hurtie' feet are better than a bloodclot.

Beverly

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

john h on 12/15/00 at 18:56 (035043)

my experience and folklore say most women are cold-footed. my feet are generally so warm i keep them from under the covers.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

john h on 12/15/00 at 18:58 (035044)

wendy: hairy toes? your are scarring the h--- out of me. sounds like the wolfwoman on a full moon. stay away from the wolfbane babe.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

john h on 12/15/00 at 19:01 (035045)

all of you ladies have just confirmed what i always knew- women have cold feet and that does not necessarily tranlate into a warm heart.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Dr. Z on 12/15/00 at 23:05 (035062)

I am just mind thinking. Raynaud phenomena is the disease that most of your are talking about. It is a vasospasm of the muscular wall of the arties that go to the toes and hands. So let' see what and how can this go on to plantar fasciitis. Well how about this idea. With lack of blood to the foot when you first ge up in the morning if your feet/ toes and muscles are very cold then you can injury them . I have never read or can I prove this. So lets talk a survey of patient with somekind of Circulaton problem

Re: Scott, what about a survey on this: circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 23:51 (035065)

Dr Z, it's an interesting thought that sluggish circulation to the extremities, which would be at its most sluggish after a night's rest, could contribute to first-thing-in-the-morning pain. Maybe this really is a productive area of research.

Scott, how would you feel about posing a research question? Would causes such as trauma/sudden injury need to be ruled out in order to establish a relationship between sluggish circulation and pf?

(I don't, as far as I know, have Raynaud's phenomenon (isn't that when there is no blood to the toes or fingers so that some of them turn white?) I have cold toes, but they've never turned white.)

Julie

 

Re: Chilblains - to Barbara

Julie on 12/15/00 at 23:55 (035066)

Barbara, you asked about chilblains (not chiliblains). My husband gets them on his fingers in cold weather (guess you wouldn't know about that sort of thing in TX). This is what the feetforlife website says about them:

'Many people suffer from cold feet in winter, but not all of them develop chilblains. Whether they do or not depends to a large extent on the efficiency of the circulation.

Chilblains are small itchy, red swellings on the skin, which can become increasingly painful, can swell and then dry out leaving cracks in the skin which expose the foot to the risk of infection. They occur on the toes, particularly the smaller ones, fingers, the face, especially the nose, and the lobes of the ears. They can also occur on areas of the feet exposed to pressure, for instance, on a bunion or where the second toe is squeezed by tight shoes.'

Julie

Re: survey Question

Julie F on 12/16/00 at 07:48 (035077)

Scott, I wasn't suggesting you revise the questionnaire. I was thinking of one of those single questions you've posted at intervals on the site. But maybe I've got the wrong end of the stick. It just seemed like an interesting connection.

Re: Scott, what about a survey on this: circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

john h on 12/16/00 at 09:20 (035078)

when the body has poor circulation such as occurs when climbing mt everest the first place blood is shut down is to the extremities. if you have poor circulation in general the same holds true. my wife has and always has had cold feet. she also has the blood pressure of a reptile and should live to be 100. her blood pressure resides around 90-95 over 60-65. why women in general have cold feet (this is an assumption on my part) may have to do with their homones.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

john h on 12/16/00 at 09:23 (035079)

actually in my many years i have never met a woman with hot feet. of course it is not a question you would normally ask 'hey babe, you got hot feet?' that sure would make a great first impression.

Re: Hot feet

wendyn on 12/16/00 at 10:48 (035082)

Here is an interesting loop to throw into the feet temperature theory.

Most times my feet are cold, can be rather mottled looking and have fairly slow capillary refill. One doctor did mention Renauds or however you spell it - but no one ever brought it up again. My sister in law has it in her hands, and it's nasty stuff - makes her hands numb and very painful - especially in cold weather.

Anyway....

When my feet are very sore after standing too much or walking to much - usually at the end of the day. They are HOT. They feel hot to me, and very warm to anyone who touches them. Capillary refill is almost instant - I can push and the white spot fills in in less than a second.

My understanding is that this is happening because of my body's response to the nerve irritation and inflammation in my feet.

But anyway - it's possible to have hot feet AND cold feet problems in the same person!

Re: Circulation and acupuncture

Julie F on 12/17/00 at 02:27 (035106)

Another thought. If poor circulation is a causative or contributory factor in PF, this might help to explain why acupuncture can help. I believe that one of its effects is that in releasing blockages along a meridian it improves circulation to the area supplied by that meridian.

Thanks for all your responses. The 'cold feet' hypothesis began as a hunch, but it's been borne out by nearly everyone. Would anyone else like to contribute?

Julie

Re: Circulation and acupuncture

john h on 12/17/00 at 14:02 (035122)

one conclusive factor in TTS and probably PF can be internal vericose veins. not necessarily the ones you can see but ones that press on nerves. wearing support stockings can help reduce the problems of vericose veins. whether they help with circulatory problems in general i do not know. seems they would as they compress the veins, increasing the pressure and blood flow and allow less pooling.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Steve P on 12/18/00 at 09:08 (035142)

Julie -- I don't think I'm particularly one or the other. (There's one in every survey, isn't there!) I haven't ever noticed particularly cold or warm feet.

However, I would think that cirulation could very possibly be a factor. I read somewhere that ESWT is thought to improve circulation as one of its benefits.

Sorry I can't give you a more definitive reply.

Steve the Medium-Footed

Re: Circulation and acupuncture

JudyS on 12/18/00 at 11:09 (035146)

Julie - your question about cold feet is one I've been thinking about a lot since winter came 'round..(yes folks, relatively speaking, there is a winter-time in Southern CA!). I've always had cold feet in the winter which could always be warmed up relatively quickly by my husband's warm ones. However, this year my feet are getting cold to the point of pain. It has surprised me quite a bit so I've been thinking about the circulation theory, cold feet and PF. We've talked about circulation often here and even Dr. Z has written a fairly good thesis about it for us this weekend. I understand that some of the B vitamins can help with poor circulation.
(P.S. this is my last 'brain wave' of the year!)

Re: Circulation and acupuncture - support stockings

Julie on 12/18/00 at 12:19 (035151)

Thanks for the insight into internal varicose veins.

I know support stockings assist venous return, but would they have any effect on delivery?

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Phil S on 12/20/00 at 11:34 (035249)

I am definitely cold-footed, cold-handed and, I like to think, warm-hearted. On the other hand (foot?), my feet frequently get hot and swollen toward evening, but mostly in the winter, go figure. I live in Arizona where winter means in the 40's to 70's, but even so I've noticed that during this past summer the burning feet problem disappeared. As soon as the temperature started cooling down, the problem returned.

Re: Circulation and PF - the story so far

Julie on 12/20/00 at 12:08 (035250)

Thanks guys for your input - John (warm), Ken (warm), Phil (cold) and Steve (medium).

Here are the results so far:

Cold-footed: 8 women, 1 man
Warm-footed: 1 woman, 2 men
Medium-footed: 1 man (well, there's always one...)

I seem to remember reading somewhere in the PF book that more women than men get PF.I missed the previous discussions on circulation - before my time - but it does look as though there is a link.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Nancy S. on 12/15/00 at 07:12 (035000)

Julie, you had a 'brain wave'? I love it. Now, do we get those in the States, or is it strictly a U.K. phenomenon? Or are you the only person in the world who has one?

On to your question: I'm definitely a cold-footed person. For many years I've worn nothing like sandals in the summer -- I wear running or hiking shoes, with socks, no matter what the temperature out. I wear socks at all times, including to bed. I've even been known to wear them to bed in midsummer, including during a heat wave.
Since it's gotten cold here in Maine, this year a few people have commented to me, now that I'm having to wear my orthotics inside Birkenstock Tatamis sandals: 'Why on earth, when you practically wear combat boots when it's 90 degrees out, are you wearing sandals now that it's 10 degrees out?'
Nancy

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 08:18 (035009)

Now, Nancy, I'm trying to think back, way, way back into the dim distant past. Seems to me I remember having the occasional brain wave at Antioch and even before, and that my friends sometimes had them too. So brain waves aren't exclusively British. But maybe they're historical, and you don't get them in the States any more.

So. Back to business. We now have a sample of two cold feet (no, four). Not a statistically significant sample, but very interesting. Hope we get some more input.

How _are_ you getting on in your Birks in freezing Maine?

Julie

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

wendyn on 12/15/00 at 08:20 (035011)

The circulation issue has come up before and I think it's an important one. If you push on your foot your finger will leave a white spot. Count how many seconds it takes to go away - this is called capillary refill. I believe it should take less than 3 seconds, mine sometimes will take 8 or 9 in my feet.

Someone said before that their doctor told them hair growth on feet is a sign of GOOD circulation. I am living proof this is not the case. I have lousy circulation, and hairy toes (if I don't wax them) now - isn't that a pretty picture first thing in the morning!

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Nancy N on 12/15/00 at 12:39 (035023)

Interesting question! I think you'd definitely call my mom cold-footed--she always wears full shoes, socks at the very least, even in the summer. Makes me warm just looking at her--I guess that makes me warm-footed! I almost always go barefoot at home (I know, I know, but I can't bear not to, and until/unless I stop getting better, I'll still rebel!), though lately, my house has been cold enough that I've had to dig out my Grinch slipper-socks--you know it's cold when I do that!

On sort of a side note, I was at Linens N'Things the other night and saw that Earth Therapeutics has a new foot-warmer available. It looks like a sock (I think--I didn't open the whole thing up) with a gel pack (it looks sort of like the eye packs you put in the freezer for your face). I assume you put the gel pack in the microwave and then stick it into the sock, which I think has a pocket to hold it so it's not directly against your skin. The package mentioned that cold feet can mess up all sorts of other body functions, though I don't remember what they were. I thought it was interesting, though. If anybody has trouble keeping their feet warm, it might be something worth checking out. (Maybe it would be a good Christmas gift!)

Re: Re:Nancy - No Bare Feet!

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 12:53 (035027)

Oh, Nancy, please, PLEASE stop going barefoot. I'm sure you will get better much, much more quickly if you wear shoes with good arch supports all the time. Won't she, Drs B & Z?? (please support me here!) It was the first important thing I learned about PF, and although I take it for granted now, I am sure it has helped more than almost anything else. NO BARE FEET!!!!

Sorry. I know you know, and have made your own decision about this, but please reconsider.

End of lecture.

All the best, Julie

Re: To Amy

Barbara TX on 12/15/00 at 14:12 (035030)

Amy - what are chiliblains? I am from Texas, but I don't suspect they have anything to do with chili! B.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Barbara TX on 12/15/00 at 14:21 (035031)

I am definately cold-footed - even when I was a teenager, my calves had a tendency to be mottled if I sat in school for long periods of time. When I was my most acute, my feet were freezing and nothing could warm them up. I find that my feet are frequently cold and I massage them lots and try to move around. I figure more circulation, more blood exchange = more healing. B.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Beverly on 12/15/00 at 14:45 (035032)

Me too. Definitely, beyond question, I am cold footed. And all my ex's would confirm that! All my life, I've heard things like, 'Get those freezing cold feet off me.'

This is an interesting trend. So far, all of us who have replied are cold feet people.

My circulation is bad enough that I can't sit for more than an hour before my calves get achey. I've been that way for years. I had superficial phebitis (inflammation but no clot) twice during grad school from writing papers round'-the-clock without taking enough breaks. I've learned to get up and walk around every hour on the computer. I do that even with 'hurtie' feet. I figure 'hurtie' feet are better than a bloodclot.

Beverly

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

john h on 12/15/00 at 18:56 (035043)

my experience and folklore say most women are cold-footed. my feet are generally so warm i keep them from under the covers.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

john h on 12/15/00 at 18:58 (035044)

wendy: hairy toes? your are scarring the h--- out of me. sounds like the wolfwoman on a full moon. stay away from the wolfbane babe.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

john h on 12/15/00 at 19:01 (035045)

all of you ladies have just confirmed what i always knew- women have cold feet and that does not necessarily tranlate into a warm heart.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Dr. Z on 12/15/00 at 23:05 (035062)

I am just mind thinking. Raynaud phenomena is the disease that most of your are talking about. It is a vasospasm of the muscular wall of the arties that go to the toes and hands. So let' see what and how can this go on to plantar fasciitis. Well how about this idea. With lack of blood to the foot when you first ge up in the morning if your feet/ toes and muscles are very cold then you can injury them . I have never read or can I prove this. So lets talk a survey of patient with somekind of Circulaton problem

Re: Scott, what about a survey on this: circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Julie F on 12/15/00 at 23:51 (035065)

Dr Z, it's an interesting thought that sluggish circulation to the extremities, which would be at its most sluggish after a night's rest, could contribute to first-thing-in-the-morning pain. Maybe this really is a productive area of research.

Scott, how would you feel about posing a research question? Would causes such as trauma/sudden injury need to be ruled out in order to establish a relationship between sluggish circulation and pf?

(I don't, as far as I know, have Raynaud's phenomenon (isn't that when there is no blood to the toes or fingers so that some of them turn white?) I have cold toes, but they've never turned white.)

Julie

 

Re: Chilblains - to Barbara

Julie on 12/15/00 at 23:55 (035066)

Barbara, you asked about chilblains (not chiliblains). My husband gets them on his fingers in cold weather (guess you wouldn't know about that sort of thing in TX). This is what the feetforlife website says about them:

'Many people suffer from cold feet in winter, but not all of them develop chilblains. Whether they do or not depends to a large extent on the efficiency of the circulation.

Chilblains are small itchy, red swellings on the skin, which can become increasingly painful, can swell and then dry out leaving cracks in the skin which expose the foot to the risk of infection. They occur on the toes, particularly the smaller ones, fingers, the face, especially the nose, and the lobes of the ears. They can also occur on areas of the feet exposed to pressure, for instance, on a bunion or where the second toe is squeezed by tight shoes.'

Julie

Re: survey Question

Julie F on 12/16/00 at 07:48 (035077)

Scott, I wasn't suggesting you revise the questionnaire. I was thinking of one of those single questions you've posted at intervals on the site. But maybe I've got the wrong end of the stick. It just seemed like an interesting connection.

Re: Scott, what about a survey on this: circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

john h on 12/16/00 at 09:20 (035078)

when the body has poor circulation such as occurs when climbing mt everest the first place blood is shut down is to the extremities. if you have poor circulation in general the same holds true. my wife has and always has had cold feet. she also has the blood pressure of a reptile and should live to be 100. her blood pressure resides around 90-95 over 60-65. why women in general have cold feet (this is an assumption on my part) may have to do with their homones.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

john h on 12/16/00 at 09:23 (035079)

actually in my many years i have never met a woman with hot feet. of course it is not a question you would normally ask 'hey babe, you got hot feet?' that sure would make a great first impression.

Re: Hot feet

wendyn on 12/16/00 at 10:48 (035082)

Here is an interesting loop to throw into the feet temperature theory.

Most times my feet are cold, can be rather mottled looking and have fairly slow capillary refill. One doctor did mention Renauds or however you spell it - but no one ever brought it up again. My sister in law has it in her hands, and it's nasty stuff - makes her hands numb and very painful - especially in cold weather.

Anyway....

When my feet are very sore after standing too much or walking to much - usually at the end of the day. They are HOT. They feel hot to me, and very warm to anyone who touches them. Capillary refill is almost instant - I can push and the white spot fills in in less than a second.

My understanding is that this is happening because of my body's response to the nerve irritation and inflammation in my feet.

But anyway - it's possible to have hot feet AND cold feet problems in the same person!

Re: Circulation and acupuncture

Julie F on 12/17/00 at 02:27 (035106)

Another thought. If poor circulation is a causative or contributory factor in PF, this might help to explain why acupuncture can help. I believe that one of its effects is that in releasing blockages along a meridian it improves circulation to the area supplied by that meridian.

Thanks for all your responses. The 'cold feet' hypothesis began as a hunch, but it's been borne out by nearly everyone. Would anyone else like to contribute?

Julie

Re: Circulation and acupuncture

john h on 12/17/00 at 14:02 (035122)

one conclusive factor in TTS and probably PF can be internal vericose veins. not necessarily the ones you can see but ones that press on nerves. wearing support stockings can help reduce the problems of vericose veins. whether they help with circulatory problems in general i do not know. seems they would as they compress the veins, increasing the pressure and blood flow and allow less pooling.

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Steve P on 12/18/00 at 09:08 (035142)

Julie -- I don't think I'm particularly one or the other. (There's one in every survey, isn't there!) I haven't ever noticed particularly cold or warm feet.

However, I would think that cirulation could very possibly be a factor. I read somewhere that ESWT is thought to improve circulation as one of its benefits.

Sorry I can't give you a more definitive reply.

Steve the Medium-Footed

Re: Circulation and acupuncture

JudyS on 12/18/00 at 11:09 (035146)

Julie - your question about cold feet is one I've been thinking about a lot since winter came 'round..(yes folks, relatively speaking, there is a winter-time in Southern CA!). I've always had cold feet in the winter which could always be warmed up relatively quickly by my husband's warm ones. However, this year my feet are getting cold to the point of pain. It has surprised me quite a bit so I've been thinking about the circulation theory, cold feet and PF. We've talked about circulation often here and even Dr. Z has written a fairly good thesis about it for us this weekend. I understand that some of the B vitamins can help with poor circulation.
(P.S. this is my last 'brain wave' of the year!)

Re: Circulation and acupuncture - support stockings

Julie on 12/18/00 at 12:19 (035151)

Thanks for the insight into internal varicose veins.

I know support stockings assist venous return, but would they have any effect on delivery?

Re: Circulation and PF - are we cold-footed or warm-footed?

Phil S on 12/20/00 at 11:34 (035249)

I am definitely cold-footed, cold-handed and, I like to think, warm-hearted. On the other hand (foot?), my feet frequently get hot and swollen toward evening, but mostly in the winter, go figure. I live in Arizona where winter means in the 40's to 70's, but even so I've noticed that during this past summer the burning feet problem disappeared. As soon as the temperature started cooling down, the problem returned.

Re: Circulation and PF - the story so far

Julie on 12/20/00 at 12:08 (035250)

Thanks guys for your input - John (warm), Ken (warm), Phil (cold) and Steve (medium).

Here are the results so far:

Cold-footed: 8 women, 1 man
Warm-footed: 1 woman, 2 men
Medium-footed: 1 man (well, there's always one...)

I seem to remember reading somewhere in the PF book that more women than men get PF.I missed the previous discussions on circulation - before my time - but it does look as though there is a link.