Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Orthotic adjustments

Posted by Nancy N on 1/07/01 at 09:01 (036065)

Richard--

In reading about Nancy S's orthotic adjustments, I'm wondering about my own. It sounds like mine were made differently than you would have made them--they are essentially one piece of hard plastic in the shape of the bottom of my foot. There's some information on the ones I have at http://www.sololabs.com/pump.html if you want to take a look (unfortunately, there is no side view, but it really is just the curve of the foot--there's nothing under the arch, I guess because the material is so hard already).

The way that mine are made makes me wonder if adjustment is even an option. I'm not sure where or how they would do it! Does that sound right to you? I hate to think that I can never use these things, but it is sure sounding that way to me. Am I right, or is there hope for them yet?

Thanks!!

Re: Orthotic adjustments

Nancy N on 1/07/01 at 09:04 (036066)

Richard--

I forgot to mention that this page says that the orthotics are for use with high heels. I'm not sure why he did that--I told him I needed something I could wear while on my feet for long periods of time (I'm trying to get a teaching job, and I also used to do a lot of choral singing, both of which require a lot of standing). I don't know why he assumed that I meant I'd be in heels--you'd never catch me dead in high heels, even before the PF! I don't know if that design is part of why they never helped in my sneakers or not.

Thanks much for your input.

Re: Orthotic adjustments

Richard, C.Ped on 1/09/01 at 08:10 (036208)

I am with you....you would not catch me dead in high heels either!!!!

I saw the picture, and from what you told me about nothing being under the arch, I have this to say:
GOOD LORD NO!!!! You would never catch me trying dispense that thing to my patients. Sorry....got carried away.

I will forgive you for using this one. I am sure you did not know better at the time. :-)

That is not what I make. Mine are full length and have plenty of fill under the arch. If you were to look at a side view, it would sit perfectly flat on a level surface. I really should add a picture to my web site.

I could almost guarantee if you were to hold up that orthosis to the cast it was made on, it would not touch the arch. I have a similar one that I take with me when I speak with physicians. That is what they are used to seeing. They see mine, and wonder how it will help the foot. I show them the fit I can get vs the other one, along with a little explaination of the comfort, and they understand.

Basically, hard plastic is old technology. The newer materials, such as the EVA I use, is the latest and the best. Sometimes changes for the 'better' can mean loss of quality (remember the Yugo?), but not in the case of the EVA.

I also do not recommend high heel shoes for anyone. I have some patients that come to me wanting 'orthopedic' high heel shoes. There are actually some that are made with extra depth. I tore the pictures out of my catalogs. Some of my ladies have insisted that their feet actually fit in their heels.

Try this. I like to trace their bare foot then put the shoe on top of the picture. You can see how you are squeezing you foot into a very unnatural shape. That usually will convince them to not wear the heels.

For teaching or other professions, there are very nice shoes avaliable from the major shoe companies such as Drew and P.W. Minor. You pay a little more, but the quality is outstanding.

To answer you question, there is no good way to adjust those inserts.
Richard

Re: Orthotic adjustments

Nancy N on 1/09/01 at 09:24 (036215)

Boy, Richard, do I wish I'd come across you before I let my Pod send off for these orthotics. I didn't think my insurance would cover them at the time, and then found out later, after I paid for them out of my own pocket, that I should have only had a $10 copay! And getting my money back from these people has been a nightmare--going on for months.

I truly didn't know better--I just figured the pod would get me what I needed. And since the first pair he 'made' for me worked so well, I figured these would be the answer. But the first pair were modified onto pre-molds, so the arch was a lot more cushioned. Maybe that was the difference, I don't know.

I'm not surprised that they can't really be adjusted--I'm not sure where you would remove any of the material. You'd definitely have to take the cover off to do it.

I really didn't mean to make you react so vehemently, and I do apologise for that :) I would not be considering the orthotics at all at this point if I didn't overpronate with my left foot. I am worried about the effects that'll have on my other joints over time, which is why I'm thinking about trying it again...if I can find another Richard to make them for me!! (You know, you really should consider cloning yourself!)

Thanks much for the info, Richard.

Re: Orthotic adjustments

Richard, C.Ped on 1/10/01 at 07:43 (036288)

Nancy,
No....You did not arise those feelings in me. I am very passionate about what I do anyway. I want people to have the best possible product. The majority of my PF patients have shown great relief in as little as two weeks. Just knowing what else is offered out there, disturbs me greatly.

Clone? I don't know. There are my partners, Mike and Sean. The share the same feelings as I do.

The only type of adjustment that I can think of is to use a heat gun until the arch feels right to you.

Richard

Re: Orthotic adjustments

Nancy N on 1/07/01 at 09:04 (036066)

Richard--

I forgot to mention that this page says that the orthotics are for use with high heels. I'm not sure why he did that--I told him I needed something I could wear while on my feet for long periods of time (I'm trying to get a teaching job, and I also used to do a lot of choral singing, both of which require a lot of standing). I don't know why he assumed that I meant I'd be in heels--you'd never catch me dead in high heels, even before the PF! I don't know if that design is part of why they never helped in my sneakers or not.

Thanks much for your input.

Re: Orthotic adjustments

Richard, C.Ped on 1/09/01 at 08:10 (036208)

I am with you....you would not catch me dead in high heels either!!!!

I saw the picture, and from what you told me about nothing being under the arch, I have this to say:
GOOD LORD NO!!!! You would never catch me trying dispense that thing to my patients. Sorry....got carried away.

I will forgive you for using this one. I am sure you did not know better at the time. :-)

That is not what I make. Mine are full length and have plenty of fill under the arch. If you were to look at a side view, it would sit perfectly flat on a level surface. I really should add a picture to my web site.

I could almost guarantee if you were to hold up that orthosis to the cast it was made on, it would not touch the arch. I have a similar one that I take with me when I speak with physicians. That is what they are used to seeing. They see mine, and wonder how it will help the foot. I show them the fit I can get vs the other one, along with a little explaination of the comfort, and they understand.

Basically, hard plastic is old technology. The newer materials, such as the EVA I use, is the latest and the best. Sometimes changes for the 'better' can mean loss of quality (remember the Yugo?), but not in the case of the EVA.

I also do not recommend high heel shoes for anyone. I have some patients that come to me wanting 'orthopedic' high heel shoes. There are actually some that are made with extra depth. I tore the pictures out of my catalogs. Some of my ladies have insisted that their feet actually fit in their heels.

Try this. I like to trace their bare foot then put the shoe on top of the picture. You can see how you are squeezing you foot into a very unnatural shape. That usually will convince them to not wear the heels.

For teaching or other professions, there are very nice shoes avaliable from the major shoe companies such as Drew and P.W. Minor. You pay a little more, but the quality is outstanding.

To answer you question, there is no good way to adjust those inserts.
Richard

Re: Orthotic adjustments

Nancy N on 1/09/01 at 09:24 (036215)

Boy, Richard, do I wish I'd come across you before I let my Pod send off for these orthotics. I didn't think my insurance would cover them at the time, and then found out later, after I paid for them out of my own pocket, that I should have only had a $10 copay! And getting my money back from these people has been a nightmare--going on for months.

I truly didn't know better--I just figured the pod would get me what I needed. And since the first pair he 'made' for me worked so well, I figured these would be the answer. But the first pair were modified onto pre-molds, so the arch was a lot more cushioned. Maybe that was the difference, I don't know.

I'm not surprised that they can't really be adjusted--I'm not sure where you would remove any of the material. You'd definitely have to take the cover off to do it.

I really didn't mean to make you react so vehemently, and I do apologise for that :) I would not be considering the orthotics at all at this point if I didn't overpronate with my left foot. I am worried about the effects that'll have on my other joints over time, which is why I'm thinking about trying it again...if I can find another Richard to make them for me!! (You know, you really should consider cloning yourself!)

Thanks much for the info, Richard.

Re: Orthotic adjustments

Richard, C.Ped on 1/10/01 at 07:43 (036288)

Nancy,
No....You did not arise those feelings in me. I am very passionate about what I do anyway. I want people to have the best possible product. The majority of my PF patients have shown great relief in as little as two weeks. Just knowing what else is offered out there, disturbs me greatly.

Clone? I don't know. There are my partners, Mike and Sean. The share the same feelings as I do.

The only type of adjustment that I can think of is to use a heat gun until the arch feels right to you.

Richard