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Richard?

Posted by wendyn on 1/09/01 at 19:34 (036265)

Richard? The article wasn't that long. Did you have any comments on it? Where did you go? Did the icey blast from the envelope do you in? I hope not.

My son got his new orthotics in December. Popped them in his shoes and off he went - he's been 100% ever since. Must be nice!!!!!!!

Re: Richard?

Richard, C.Ped on 1/10/01 at 06:57 (036283)

Sorry, I will finish it this morning. I have been pretty busy lately. I will let you know today.
Richard

Re: Richard?

Richard, C.Ped on 1/10/01 at 07:32 (036287)

Ok, I finished it. I am not much of a reader. I have to be in the mood.

To catch everyone up a little, Wendy sent me an article about not using orthotics in motion control shoes. I wanted to read it and give my opinion.

Seems to me that the way he describes motion control shoes are shoes with built in arch support. He states that you should use orthotics only in neutral shoes. I fit orthotics to the shoe, no matter what type of 'arch' is in them. It all comes down to interfacing. If someone does not take the time to interfact the orthosis with the shoe, yes, there will be way to much arch.

He states that if you double up by using shoes with 'arch' and orthotics, you will 'restrict the foot from any motion at all'. I don't know about that. You will cause the foot to go into excessive supination, thus causing potential injury to the lateral aspect of the foot. Not good. All that arch would be very uncomfortable as well. I guess he would be talking about limiting the motion of the ankle.

After I interface the orthosis with the shoe, I have the patient stand for me. I feel for sub talor neutral to make sure the insert is doing its job. I also look at the patient's feet while standing as well a walking. If they seem to supinate to much, adjustments will be done.

It is very simple to do interfacing. It takes a little time to make sure it is right.

Hope that answers your question Wendy. If not, please let me know.

Richard

Re: Richard?

JudyS on 1/10/01 at 11:22 (036319)

Richard, your description of orthotic 'interfacing' brings up one (of many!) confusing point about treating PF. If I understand your words correctly, you are fitting the orthotic to the shoe (as well as the client)- no matter the construction of the shoe. The confusing thing is that most folks are pretty much forced to wear more than one style of shoe in their normal, day-to-day lives. We've all received orthotics of one form or another and were simply told to put them in the shoe du'jour! But you're saying one orthotic, one shoe?

Re: Richard?

Richard, C.Ped on 1/10/01 at 11:50 (036321)

Not really. I tell people to bring the shoes they most often wear so I can make sure the inserts fit in their shoes. Most of the people I have seen, wear two to maybe three pair at the most. High heel dress shoes are out. I have never had a problem fitting the inserts to two or three pair. The object is to make sure the insert will sit flat in the shoe.

I also judge it on the style of the shoe.

Richard

Re: Richard?

Richard, C.Ped on 1/10/01 at 06:57 (036283)

Sorry, I will finish it this morning. I have been pretty busy lately. I will let you know today.
Richard

Re: Richard?

Richard, C.Ped on 1/10/01 at 07:32 (036287)

Ok, I finished it. I am not much of a reader. I have to be in the mood.

To catch everyone up a little, Wendy sent me an article about not using orthotics in motion control shoes. I wanted to read it and give my opinion.

Seems to me that the way he describes motion control shoes are shoes with built in arch support. He states that you should use orthotics only in neutral shoes. I fit orthotics to the shoe, no matter what type of 'arch' is in them. It all comes down to interfacing. If someone does not take the time to interfact the orthosis with the shoe, yes, there will be way to much arch.

He states that if you double up by using shoes with 'arch' and orthotics, you will 'restrict the foot from any motion at all'. I don't know about that. You will cause the foot to go into excessive supination, thus causing potential injury to the lateral aspect of the foot. Not good. All that arch would be very uncomfortable as well. I guess he would be talking about limiting the motion of the ankle.

After I interface the orthosis with the shoe, I have the patient stand for me. I feel for sub talor neutral to make sure the insert is doing its job. I also look at the patient's feet while standing as well a walking. If they seem to supinate to much, adjustments will be done.

It is very simple to do interfacing. It takes a little time to make sure it is right.

Hope that answers your question Wendy. If not, please let me know.

Richard

Re: Richard?

JudyS on 1/10/01 at 11:22 (036319)

Richard, your description of orthotic 'interfacing' brings up one (of many!) confusing point about treating PF. If I understand your words correctly, you are fitting the orthotic to the shoe (as well as the client)- no matter the construction of the shoe. The confusing thing is that most folks are pretty much forced to wear more than one style of shoe in their normal, day-to-day lives. We've all received orthotics of one form or another and were simply told to put them in the shoe du'jour! But you're saying one orthotic, one shoe?

Re: Richard?

Richard, C.Ped on 1/10/01 at 11:50 (036321)

Not really. I tell people to bring the shoes they most often wear so I can make sure the inserts fit in their shoes. Most of the people I have seen, wear two to maybe three pair at the most. High heel dress shoes are out. I have never had a problem fitting the inserts to two or three pair. The object is to make sure the insert will sit flat in the shoe.

I also judge it on the style of the shoe.

Richard