Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

eswt question...

Posted by JudyS on 1/10/01 at 17:37 (036348)

Docs - One facet of the traditional PF surgery is that it supposedly helps to relieve tension on the Plantar by actually elongating, or releasing, the Plantar a bit. So, if the inherent problem of a given patient is that he/she has very high and very rigid arches (Plantars?), would ESWT also help by creating a bit of 'release' in the Plantar?

Re: eswt question...

Dr. Zuckerman on 1/10/01 at 20:13 (036360)

This is a very good question to ask. When you have pain at the insertion of the plantar fasica due to a tear the problem that ESWT will address is to heal the area where the tear is . When a release is done for this type of plantar fascia problem the release can do two things. 1. you cut the pf so that is no traction at the insertion and thus you can get a healing. 2. The cut or release is done right at the insertion so that the tear is cut again and the body has the ability to heal the insertion of the pf. This is the approach that I use when I do Miminial incision releases.

The type of plantar fasciitis due to high rigid arches isn't the same type of plantar fasciitis that I address either with a typical plantar fascia realease or ESWT for healing of the tear at the insertion.

In order to determine if a release would help you for your high rigid arches there needs to be a more in depth history and examination.

Where is your pain. What part of your pain is your arch. Is there degenerative joint disease in the bones that make up your arch. Do your have a neurological conponent to your foot. Is there lower back involvement

I hope I have added information to your question and hope that I am not confusing this issue. The tightness in typical plantar fasciitis doesn't exist. I have proven this with ESWT. Patients have very 'tight' plantar fasia. After the ESWT treatment complete relaxing of the plantar fascia and no pain at the insertion. So tight plantar fascia is really tighting due to pain and change in gait.

Re: eswt question...

john h on 1/16/01 at 10:37 (036674)

dr Z: i sort of thought that ESWT would damage the tissue and in the process of healing a new and bigger bllood supply would be available to the injured area. perhaps an immune response would be trigggered by the damage?

Re: eswt question...

Dr. Zuckerman on 1/10/01 at 20:13 (036360)

This is a very good question to ask. When you have pain at the insertion of the plantar fasica due to a tear the problem that ESWT will address is to heal the area where the tear is . When a release is done for this type of plantar fascia problem the release can do two things. 1. you cut the pf so that is no traction at the insertion and thus you can get a healing. 2. The cut or release is done right at the insertion so that the tear is cut again and the body has the ability to heal the insertion of the pf. This is the approach that I use when I do Miminial incision releases.

The type of plantar fasciitis due to high rigid arches isn't the same type of plantar fasciitis that I address either with a typical plantar fascia realease or ESWT for healing of the tear at the insertion.

In order to determine if a release would help you for your high rigid arches there needs to be a more in depth history and examination.

Where is your pain. What part of your pain is your arch. Is there degenerative joint disease in the bones that make up your arch. Do your have a neurological conponent to your foot. Is there lower back involvement

I hope I have added information to your question and hope that I am not confusing this issue. The tightness in typical plantar fasciitis doesn't exist. I have proven this with ESWT. Patients have very 'tight' plantar fasia. After the ESWT treatment complete relaxing of the plantar fascia and no pain at the insertion. So tight plantar fascia is really tighting due to pain and change in gait.

Re: eswt question...

john h on 1/16/01 at 10:37 (036674)

dr Z: i sort of thought that ESWT would damage the tissue and in the process of healing a new and bigger bllood supply would be available to the injured area. perhaps an immune response would be trigggered by the damage?