Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Rolling Pin Treatment

Posted by Joanie K. on 2/08/01 at 17:36 (038462)

A year and a half ago I was desparate for relief of my heel pain like many of you. I found this web site very helpful. It has changed a lot since then. I sought help from my podiatrist and did a lot of the recommened treatments such as night splints, walking cast, stretches, ice, cortisone injections, over the counter inserts, physical therapy and meds. All seemed to help some but none ever gave me the 'cure' I was looking for. Then remembered reading about a kind of bizarre sounding (to me) treatment studied at the Natl. Institute of Health. on this web site. It stated in this study done there that the people who tried it felt it was a cure for them. Being at wits end I was ready to try anything! But really didn't wan't to try the surgery. It recommended placing a rolling pin on the floor (on carpet)and while STANDING (hold on to a counter or chair)apply as much weight as possible first to the arch and then moving the foot forward some and applying weight to the heel area. WOW, did that hurt the first time. The next day I was surprised that my heel felt somewhat better. I continued using this treatment and continued to improve. I then finally invested in custom made orthotics casted for my feet. I feel that the rolling pin treatment, stretches and the custom orthotics finally gave me the cure I was looking for. Today I am still doing well but If I feel any discomfort I go back to it. My doctor had told me to fill a 20 oz. Coke bottle with water and freeze it and roll my foot on it, which I did but did it sitting down. When I told him about using the rolling pin and the success I felt I was having he told me 'that is what he meant'. Guess he didn't make it clear to me. Like I mentioned it has been about 1 1/2 years. Today I tried searching for info on that treatment and could find no mention of it?

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

Bill E. on 2/09/01 at 06:43 (038509)

I have a commercial product, called a 'Foot Log' that is about the size of a rolling pin with knobby surfaces. I have never stood down on it with much weight. I use it while sitting and try to press down with some force when I use it. It does feel pretty good but I am not conviced that it stretches a lot. Instead, I have a couple of calf stretches and a good PF stretch. Sitting on the floor, hold you foot in one hand and then with the other hand, pull your toes back towards your ankle. Then I massage the plantar fascia with my hand while stretching. I can actually feel the fascia like a band near my heel. This seems to really help me. I think I will try your 'rolling pin' treatment with my Foot Log, after my standard PF stretch!

Thanks for the hints...every little bit helps.
Bill

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

Paula on 2/10/01 at 14:25 (038621)

I must say, at first I thought ya, okay. But, I must say...I have tried the rolling pin. WOW! I could sit all day using it on my feet. I am doing it little by little. Not bearing much weight right now because I cannot. But I used it last night and it felt just wonderful.
Thank you for your input.

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

Joanie K on 2/12/01 at 01:48 (038719)

I think the idea behind putting as much weight on it is that it breaks up the old scar tissue and new healthier scar tissue forms. I also would just sit and do it with the frozen pop bottle like I thought my Dr. meant and it wasn't until I went back and found the article in 'the book' about the rolling pin did I realize I was suppose to apply more weight. I would put the rolling pin on the floor on my kitchen rug in front of my sink and support some of my weight on the counter in a corner where two sections of counter come together. Then I would slowly lower as much of my weight as I could stand. It was extremly painful the first time but the next day my foot felt better and I continued to do it every day and everyday there was improvement and I could bear more weight on the rolling pin. They must have removed that article because I searched for it before posting so other people could refer to it if they wanted. Darn. I hope you continue to improve and get as much benefit from it as I did.
Joanie

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

mike b. on 2/18/01 at 00:33 (039292)

This works for me too. I don't have a rolling pin yet but I tried it using a small dumbell and it helps. I got similar relief when I have had a friend massage my foot. She pushes hard in the rear of the heel where it hurts. But after the initial pain, she says it is hard for her to 'find the spot' again, meaning that the pain has subsided. It usually feels lots better the next day, too. I am still bewildered as to 'why' this actually works. I think the 'breaking down of scar tissue' idea is flawed, because the relief is so immediate. What a mystery!

mike b.

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

wendyn on 2/18/01 at 11:00 (039303)

Mike - this very well could be a 'trigger point' that she's located. When you push on a trigger point - it is (as one medical write up stated) 'exquistely tender'. After a minute or so of compression - the pain eases up and often disappears. A completely non medical explanation is that it increases circulation - and flushes out all the bad 'crap' from the area. I know I have a write up somewhere (or I used to) let me know if you want me to find it.

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

mike b. on 2/18/01 at 14:14 (039317)

wendy - yes, i would love to see the article if you can find it without too much trouble. it seems to make sense about the trigger point. It is definitely weird. I remember once that I ran 2 or 3 miles and experienced some of the increase in pain associated with increased activity. then my friend massaged the trigger point that night, and the next day i was miraculously better. it gradually came back. the acupuncture/herbalist that i saw, he went straight to it (the trigger point) when he examined me. he pushed on the heel in the precise spot of the trigger point with very little explanation from me. he also claimed that he could definitely cure the problem through acupuncture and herbs, and that my liver and kidneys needed flushing out. who knows? unfortunately i don't really have the time or the money (at least right now) for 12, 45 minute acupuncture sessions. maybe in the summer.

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

wendyn on 2/18/01 at 17:01 (039328)

http://www.curtin.edu.au/curtin/dept/physio/podiatry/encyclopedia/myofascial/

This is the link to the article I was referring to. AlanK posted it here several months ago.

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment - trigger points

Julie on 2/18/01 at 17:43 (039334)

I believe the trigger points correspond to acupuncture points along the meridians. When these are needled, or massaged, the energy blockages along that meridian are released, and the vital energy can then flow. This increases circulation and can reduce pain.

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

Bill E. on 2/09/01 at 06:43 (038509)

I have a commercial product, called a 'Foot Log' that is about the size of a rolling pin with knobby surfaces. I have never stood down on it with much weight. I use it while sitting and try to press down with some force when I use it. It does feel pretty good but I am not conviced that it stretches a lot. Instead, I have a couple of calf stretches and a good PF stretch. Sitting on the floor, hold you foot in one hand and then with the other hand, pull your toes back towards your ankle. Then I massage the plantar fascia with my hand while stretching. I can actually feel the fascia like a band near my heel. This seems to really help me. I think I will try your 'rolling pin' treatment with my Foot Log, after my standard PF stretch!

Thanks for the hints...every little bit helps.
Bill

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

Paula on 2/10/01 at 14:25 (038621)

I must say, at first I thought ya, okay. But, I must say...I have tried the rolling pin. WOW! I could sit all day using it on my feet. I am doing it little by little. Not bearing much weight right now because I cannot. But I used it last night and it felt just wonderful.
Thank you for your input.

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

Joanie K on 2/12/01 at 01:48 (038719)

I think the idea behind putting as much weight on it is that it breaks up the old scar tissue and new healthier scar tissue forms. I also would just sit and do it with the frozen pop bottle like I thought my Dr. meant and it wasn't until I went back and found the article in 'the book' about the rolling pin did I realize I was suppose to apply more weight. I would put the rolling pin on the floor on my kitchen rug in front of my sink and support some of my weight on the counter in a corner where two sections of counter come together. Then I would slowly lower as much of my weight as I could stand. It was extremly painful the first time but the next day my foot felt better and I continued to do it every day and everyday there was improvement and I could bear more weight on the rolling pin. They must have removed that article because I searched for it before posting so other people could refer to it if they wanted. Darn. I hope you continue to improve and get as much benefit from it as I did.
Joanie

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

mike b. on 2/18/01 at 00:33 (039292)

This works for me too. I don't have a rolling pin yet but I tried it using a small dumbell and it helps. I got similar relief when I have had a friend massage my foot. She pushes hard in the rear of the heel where it hurts. But after the initial pain, she says it is hard for her to 'find the spot' again, meaning that the pain has subsided. It usually feels lots better the next day, too. I am still bewildered as to 'why' this actually works. I think the 'breaking down of scar tissue' idea is flawed, because the relief is so immediate. What a mystery!

mike b.

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

wendyn on 2/18/01 at 11:00 (039303)

Mike - this very well could be a 'trigger point' that she's located. When you push on a trigger point - it is (as one medical write up stated) 'exquistely tender'. After a minute or so of compression - the pain eases up and often disappears. A completely non medical explanation is that it increases circulation - and flushes out all the bad 'crap' from the area. I know I have a write up somewhere (or I used to) let me know if you want me to find it.

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

mike b. on 2/18/01 at 14:14 (039317)

wendy - yes, i would love to see the article if you can find it without too much trouble. it seems to make sense about the trigger point. It is definitely weird. I remember once that I ran 2 or 3 miles and experienced some of the increase in pain associated with increased activity. then my friend massaged the trigger point that night, and the next day i was miraculously better. it gradually came back. the acupuncture/herbalist that i saw, he went straight to it (the trigger point) when he examined me. he pushed on the heel in the precise spot of the trigger point with very little explanation from me. he also claimed that he could definitely cure the problem through acupuncture and herbs, and that my liver and kidneys needed flushing out. who knows? unfortunately i don't really have the time or the money (at least right now) for 12, 45 minute acupuncture sessions. maybe in the summer.

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment

wendyn on 2/18/01 at 17:01 (039328)

http://www.curtin.edu.au/curtin/dept/physio/podiatry/encyclopedia/myofascial/

This is the link to the article I was referring to. AlanK posted it here several months ago.

Re: Rolling Pin Treatment - trigger points

Julie on 2/18/01 at 17:43 (039334)

I believe the trigger points correspond to acupuncture points along the meridians. When these are needled, or massaged, the energy blockages along that meridian are released, and the vital energy can then flow. This increases circulation and can reduce pain.