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I would appreciate it, if someone could explain taping methods ~

Posted by Judith P on 2/09/01 at 11:03 (038532)

I have read several posts about taping. I must have the worst Pod. in the world. He never has suggested taping or any stretching excercises for pain management. I would really appreciate it if someone could explain how the taping is done and what kind of stretching excercises are good. Most of my pain is confined to the heel. Thanks soooooooooooooo much!!

Re: I would appreciate it, if someone could explain taping methods ~

Kim B. on 2/09/01 at 13:00 (038543)

Judith, I know nothing about taping methods, but I just used the search feature using ' taping methods' and it brought up some ideas for beginners. Also try ' taping' ' tape' and other variations of the topic, and that my help too.

Good Luck, Kim B.

Re: I would appreciate it, if someone could explain taping methods ~

Julie on 2/09/01 at 14:36 (038558)

Hi Judith

First of all - have you read the PF Book? Do: it will give you a great deal of helpful information. Amongst other things, it contains good instructions and clear illustrations for several different methods of taping.

But if it helps you to have the benefit of someone's experience, here goes. I have been taping my foot for several months. I use the first and simplest method that the PF Book describes: two strips of tape that connect the ball of the foot and the heel. I know others have found other methods helpful: this is the one I like best. It is the easiest to apply, and the most economical on tape, and it works for me. Please look at the illustration which will give you a better idea of how it should look once it's on than any number of words.

You need a good quality tape that will adhere well and maintain its tension: otherwise it will go lax after a short while and be useless. I use Leuko tape, made by Beiersdorf in Spain: 3.75cm wide. If it isn't available in the States, there will be others, I'm sure.

You will need to experiment a little to get the right tension. It is supposed to be tense/tight enough to give support to the arch, but not tight enough to pull on the fascia. This will vary with each individual. I will tell you how I do it. I keep my foot dorsiflexed (toes pulled back) and then apply the tape tightly. I have found that if I apply the tape with my foot in a neutral position, it is much too tight when I stand up. I start the first strip immediately under my big toe, stretch it down over the arch, and end it as it curls round the heel. The second strip overlaps it slightly.

I've also used a Futuro ankle brace, which gives support to the arch as well as the ankle, on top of the tape - this is helpful too, especially if I'm going to be on my feet a lot.

You need to take the tape off every night to let the skin recover. Do this carefully so as not to hurt the skin. Lighter fluid on cotton wool removes the residue. This isn't pleasant, but it's quickly done.

It's hard to recommend stretching exercises. If your PF is due to tight calf muscles, then you do need to stretch them. If your calf muscles are already well stretched, stretching them further may do more harm than good. Your pod should really have evaluated you for this and told you what to do - but even then, most pods seem to advise the classic wall stretches, which many people on this site, including myself, have found make matters worse. I now feel that most people need to be careful with weight-bearing exercise, which can so easily overstretch the fascia and damage the achilles tendon.

Look at the products on the home page. Many people like the Personal Foot Trainer (that should give you the link) and Dr Z recommends it. I and others like the Acu-Flex, which you could also investigate. Both these give you a variety of stretches that that help to strengthen the musculature of the foot as well as being useful in the management of PF.

I have found that the simple foot exercises I've practised and taught for years to yoga classes have taken on a completely new dimension since I've been dealing with PF: curling and stretching the toes, flexing and extending the ankles, and circling the ankles. You could try these. You can e-mail me if you'd like more detail.

The main thing to be aware of is that if you try any exercise, go carefully, and if it hurts, stop.

I hope this has been some help.

All the best

Julie

Re: I would appreciate it, if someone could explain taping methods ~

Lori B on 2/09/01 at 23:46 (038587)

Judith, I can't believe your pod has never recommended taping. It REALLY helped me, more than anything else. I would get my feet taped everytime I knew I was going to be doing alot of walking, like around Europe last summer, and a trip to Disneyland. But going to the pod every day to have my feet taped was just not convenient. On this board, someone recommended a product called PSC bandages or splints made by Fabrifoam. They are a little pricey- $30 each, but they work pretty good. I am still trying to figure just the right way to put them on, but they have helped. The only side effect is the rubber side that goes next to your skin. On my left foot, it caused irritation and an itch after I wore it a full day. I scratched it so much that I caused an abrasion. So I put a bandaid on and put the tape back on the next day. I got the info from Dr. Zucker from this board, but he gave me the fax number. i'm sorry but I misplaced the correct number, but if you call information for Exton, PA and Fabrifoam, they can give you the number. Hopefully, that will help you, but it might be a good idea to have your feet taped first by a pod, (maybe not neccessarily the one you have now.) and see if it helps you. If it doesn't, then PSC splints will not help.

Re: I would appreciate it, if someone could explain taping methods ~

Judith P on 2/11/01 at 20:02 (038710)

Thanks so much for all the useful information. I'm so glad I have found this site, as my pod has not suggested many ways to help this situation. I have learned more here in a few days than I have from him in several months. Thanks again, and I plan to read ALL of the PF Book.***

Re: I would appreciate it, if someone could explain taping methods ~

Judith P on 2/11/01 at 20:10 (038711)

Taping is completely new to me. I can't believe the amount of information my Pod did 'not' tell me. I have to stand almost exclusively on my job, so I would definitely like to try the taping thing. I went to the heelspur.com site and got some pictures of the wrapping method he had there.
Also, I am trying to do some stretching excercises I saw there. I think the stretching is helping short term, and will probably help more when I do them more. I am very very glad to have found this site. Thanks so much for your reply.**

Re: taping methods and some additional questions.

Bill E. on 2/12/01 at 11:16 (038726)

Judith,
I just started taping myself after being chastised (gently) in one of my posts below. I use 'athletic tape' that I purchased at WalMart or KMart. It seems to work pretty well. I use the simple method mentioned in some of the responses with two pieces of tape making a sort of figure 8 open on one end. I tired several different 'tensions' by changing the amount that my foot was flexed when I put the tape on. It does give support and I use it with over the counter orthotics in all of my shoes. The orthotics give arch support as well as additional cushioning.

Stretching. I find this to be one of the best things for me. I have a couple of posts below where I describe a couple of non-weight bearing stretches. I also do the weight bearing ones because my PF isn't so severe that they bother me.

A question for those who tape. My only problem is that after about 4 days of taping the skin on the ball of my right foot has become very tender. It is almost like it is abraded or something. I wonder if the tape is pulling it laterally in a way that is irritating. There is only soreness under the toes on that foot though I have been taping both feet. The PF in my right one is much worse than the left and maybe I taped tighter to compensate for that. Has anyone encountered anything like this. Are there any product that can be used to toughen the skin?

Thanks for any comments!
Bill

Re: taping methods and some additional questions.

Ellen W on 2/12/01 at 13:11 (038729)

Bill,
Maybe you could try covering the area that gets abraded. Bandaid makes a silicon, gel-padded patches that might work, depending on how large the area is. There's also a dermatology product made to cover skin irritations and topically applied medications called Duo-derm. It's an over the counter item that a pharmacist can order --though this is pricey, I paid about $40 for a small package. Otherwise, you might need to hold off on taping until the irritation heals.
Ellen

Re: taping methods - underwrap to prevent tape irritation.

Donna SL on 2/12/01 at 13:54 (038732)

Bill,

There is a material called 'underwrap' that is made specifically to put around the skin first under the tape It almost looks like a thin stretchy foam nylon. I got some from a PT, but I've seen it sold in a Walgreens pharmacy. It comes on a roll just like tape, and you wrap it around your foot first, then put the tape over it, and it keeps the skin from getting irritated, and pulled.

It may take a little longer to work with that, and the tape, but it's worth it. I usually just wrapped it around the midfoot, where the larger strips of tape were. I don't remember the name of the company who makes it in the retail store, just that it was a yellow color. The stuff I got from the PT was beige. A good sports medicine store, pod, or physical therapy place should now what this is.
Just ask for 'underwrap' to put under the tape, and ask them to show you how to use it.

I did a search on underwrap on the web, and there are many places that sell it. Below are a couple of examples of on-line sites that sell it, if you can't find it. Also, you can see what it looks like.

http://www.muellersportsmed.com/underwrap.htm

http://www.onlinesports.com/pages/I,CR-214630.html

Donna

Re: Thanks

Bill E. on 2/12/01 at 18:57 (038758)

One thing about this BB is that you can always expect a useful reply!

For now I'm laying off the taping and will look for the underwrap. It seems that in the olden days, there was a spray on product that toughened the skin. Probably carcingenic or something so no longer used. The problem for me is that the irritation is right where the tape is 'attaching' under the ball of my foot. But I'll experiment!!

Thanks again!!
Bill

Re: DEAR SCOTT

Barbara TX on 2/12/01 at 20:28 (038766)

Could you ever offer the PSC (Pronation Spring Control) Wrap by Fabrifoam on the Products Page? Seems like a lot of folks could benefit from a good product that avoids some of the tape troubles they seem to be having. I know the company is in Exton, PA 19341, but that's about it. Maybe you could stock it, along with bulk taping products and make some extra jackson. Thanks, B.

Re: DEAR SCOTT

Scott R on 2/12/01 at 21:13 (038768)

Barbara,
My last repsonse to this topic 21 days ago still applies so here's a repost of that response:

Thanks for the notice. They sent me a free PSC years ago. I like Dr. Roth's FABs better because there is a cushion 'bump' under the arch. I'll be selling one or both of them as soon as I can. Much bigger things are in the works.

The fabrifoam PSC has been listed [on the products page] at http://heelspurs.com for 3 or 4 years.

Re: Thanks

Julie on 2/13/01 at 02:03 (038789)

Bill, when you resume taping you could also experiment with different tapes. I'm sure they vary in the way and to the extent that they adhere, and it could be the tape itself that is causing the irritation. Whatever tape is used, it needs to be removed slowly and carefully.

The underwraps others have recommended sound good. You might also like to try using a healing cream on the soles of your feet overnight after you've removed the tape. Tea Tree cream is excellent, or any of the calendula based creams.

Re: Thanks

Bill E. on 2/13/01 at 07:58 (038803)

Julie,

It may have just been the way I taped one day or my activities that day or something. After a day of no taping, I am back to it and it feels OK. I am a little leary of healing creams or moisturizing creams because I have the impression (prejudice?) that they will soften the sole of my foot and that will make it more susceptible to the pulling of the tape. Maybe I am wrong about that aspect.

I don't think that it is the tape because it is only sore in a small area and on one foot though I taped both feet and over a significant area of skin. Actually the tape that I am using feels quite good. It doesn't seem to stretch as the day wears on and it goes on easily and comes off very cleanly with virtually no adhesive left on my feet.

I'll try a cream for a few days on your recommendation! ;-)
Bill

Re: Thanks

Julie on 2/13/01 at 08:27 (038805)

Bill, your tape sounds great. What is it called? Not that it's available here, I suppose.

Creams do soften the skin, so if you don't think you need to use one, ignore my suggestion. I'm glad the taping seems to be working again.

Julie

Re: DEAR SCOTT

Barbara TX on 2/13/01 at 09:25 (038808)

Sorry, Scott - that post must have escaped me! B.

Re: I would appreciate it, if someone could explain taping methods ~

Kim B. on 2/09/01 at 13:00 (038543)

Judith, I know nothing about taping methods, but I just used the search feature using ' taping methods' and it brought up some ideas for beginners. Also try ' taping' ' tape' and other variations of the topic, and that my help too.

Good Luck, Kim B.

Re: I would appreciate it, if someone could explain taping methods ~

Julie on 2/09/01 at 14:36 (038558)

Hi Judith

First of all - have you read the PF Book? Do: it will give you a great deal of helpful information. Amongst other things, it contains good instructions and clear illustrations for several different methods of taping.

But if it helps you to have the benefit of someone's experience, here goes. I have been taping my foot for several months. I use the first and simplest method that the PF Book describes: two strips of tape that connect the ball of the foot and the heel. I know others have found other methods helpful: this is the one I like best. It is the easiest to apply, and the most economical on tape, and it works for me. Please look at the illustration which will give you a better idea of how it should look once it's on than any number of words.

You need a good quality tape that will adhere well and maintain its tension: otherwise it will go lax after a short while and be useless. I use Leuko tape, made by Beiersdorf in Spain: 3.75cm wide. If it isn't available in the States, there will be others, I'm sure.

You will need to experiment a little to get the right tension. It is supposed to be tense/tight enough to give support to the arch, but not tight enough to pull on the fascia. This will vary with each individual. I will tell you how I do it. I keep my foot dorsiflexed (toes pulled back) and then apply the tape tightly. I have found that if I apply the tape with my foot in a neutral position, it is much too tight when I stand up. I start the first strip immediately under my big toe, stretch it down over the arch, and end it as it curls round the heel. The second strip overlaps it slightly.

I've also used a Futuro ankle brace, which gives support to the arch as well as the ankle, on top of the tape - this is helpful too, especially if I'm going to be on my feet a lot.

You need to take the tape off every night to let the skin recover. Do this carefully so as not to hurt the skin. Lighter fluid on cotton wool removes the residue. This isn't pleasant, but it's quickly done.

It's hard to recommend stretching exercises. If your PF is due to tight calf muscles, then you do need to stretch them. If your calf muscles are already well stretched, stretching them further may do more harm than good. Your pod should really have evaluated you for this and told you what to do - but even then, most pods seem to advise the classic wall stretches, which many people on this site, including myself, have found make matters worse. I now feel that most people need to be careful with weight-bearing exercise, which can so easily overstretch the fascia and damage the achilles tendon.

Look at the products on the home page. Many people like the Personal Foot Trainer (that should give you the link) and Dr Z recommends it. I and others like the Acu-Flex, which you could also investigate. Both these give you a variety of stretches that that help to strengthen the musculature of the foot as well as being useful in the management of PF.

I have found that the simple foot exercises I've practised and taught for years to yoga classes have taken on a completely new dimension since I've been dealing with PF: curling and stretching the toes, flexing and extending the ankles, and circling the ankles. You could try these. You can e-mail me if you'd like more detail.

The main thing to be aware of is that if you try any exercise, go carefully, and if it hurts, stop.

I hope this has been some help.

All the best

Julie

Re: I would appreciate it, if someone could explain taping methods ~

Lori B on 2/09/01 at 23:46 (038587)

Judith, I can't believe your pod has never recommended taping. It REALLY helped me, more than anything else. I would get my feet taped everytime I knew I was going to be doing alot of walking, like around Europe last summer, and a trip to Disneyland. But going to the pod every day to have my feet taped was just not convenient. On this board, someone recommended a product called PSC bandages or splints made by Fabrifoam. They are a little pricey- $30 each, but they work pretty good. I am still trying to figure just the right way to put them on, but they have helped. The only side effect is the rubber side that goes next to your skin. On my left foot, it caused irritation and an itch after I wore it a full day. I scratched it so much that I caused an abrasion. So I put a bandaid on and put the tape back on the next day. I got the info from Dr. Zucker from this board, but he gave me the fax number. i'm sorry but I misplaced the correct number, but if you call information for Exton, PA and Fabrifoam, they can give you the number. Hopefully, that will help you, but it might be a good idea to have your feet taped first by a pod, (maybe not neccessarily the one you have now.) and see if it helps you. If it doesn't, then PSC splints will not help.

Re: I would appreciate it, if someone could explain taping methods ~

Judith P on 2/11/01 at 20:02 (038710)

Thanks so much for all the useful information. I'm so glad I have found this site, as my pod has not suggested many ways to help this situation. I have learned more here in a few days than I have from him in several months. Thanks again, and I plan to read ALL of the PF Book.***

Re: I would appreciate it, if someone could explain taping methods ~

Judith P on 2/11/01 at 20:10 (038711)

Taping is completely new to me. I can't believe the amount of information my Pod did 'not' tell me. I have to stand almost exclusively on my job, so I would definitely like to try the taping thing. I went to the heelspur.com site and got some pictures of the wrapping method he had there.
Also, I am trying to do some stretching excercises I saw there. I think the stretching is helping short term, and will probably help more when I do them more. I am very very glad to have found this site. Thanks so much for your reply.**

Re: taping methods and some additional questions.

Bill E. on 2/12/01 at 11:16 (038726)

Judith,
I just started taping myself after being chastised (gently) in one of my posts below. I use 'athletic tape' that I purchased at WalMart or KMart. It seems to work pretty well. I use the simple method mentioned in some of the responses with two pieces of tape making a sort of figure 8 open on one end. I tired several different 'tensions' by changing the amount that my foot was flexed when I put the tape on. It does give support and I use it with over the counter orthotics in all of my shoes. The orthotics give arch support as well as additional cushioning.

Stretching. I find this to be one of the best things for me. I have a couple of posts below where I describe a couple of non-weight bearing stretches. I also do the weight bearing ones because my PF isn't so severe that they bother me.

A question for those who tape. My only problem is that after about 4 days of taping the skin on the ball of my right foot has become very tender. It is almost like it is abraded or something. I wonder if the tape is pulling it laterally in a way that is irritating. There is only soreness under the toes on that foot though I have been taping both feet. The PF in my right one is much worse than the left and maybe I taped tighter to compensate for that. Has anyone encountered anything like this. Are there any product that can be used to toughen the skin?

Thanks for any comments!
Bill

Re: taping methods and some additional questions.

Ellen W on 2/12/01 at 13:11 (038729)

Bill,
Maybe you could try covering the area that gets abraded. Bandaid makes a silicon, gel-padded patches that might work, depending on how large the area is. There's also a dermatology product made to cover skin irritations and topically applied medications called Duo-derm. It's an over the counter item that a pharmacist can order --though this is pricey, I paid about $40 for a small package. Otherwise, you might need to hold off on taping until the irritation heals.
Ellen

Re: taping methods - underwrap to prevent tape irritation.

Donna SL on 2/12/01 at 13:54 (038732)

Bill,

There is a material called 'underwrap' that is made specifically to put around the skin first under the tape It almost looks like a thin stretchy foam nylon. I got some from a PT, but I've seen it sold in a Walgreens pharmacy. It comes on a roll just like tape, and you wrap it around your foot first, then put the tape over it, and it keeps the skin from getting irritated, and pulled.

It may take a little longer to work with that, and the tape, but it's worth it. I usually just wrapped it around the midfoot, where the larger strips of tape were. I don't remember the name of the company who makes it in the retail store, just that it was a yellow color. The stuff I got from the PT was beige. A good sports medicine store, pod, or physical therapy place should now what this is.
Just ask for 'underwrap' to put under the tape, and ask them to show you how to use it.

I did a search on underwrap on the web, and there are many places that sell it. Below are a couple of examples of on-line sites that sell it, if you can't find it. Also, you can see what it looks like.

http://www.muellersportsmed.com/underwrap.htm

http://www.onlinesports.com/pages/I,CR-214630.html

Donna

Re: Thanks

Bill E. on 2/12/01 at 18:57 (038758)

One thing about this BB is that you can always expect a useful reply!

For now I'm laying off the taping and will look for the underwrap. It seems that in the olden days, there was a spray on product that toughened the skin. Probably carcingenic or something so no longer used. The problem for me is that the irritation is right where the tape is 'attaching' under the ball of my foot. But I'll experiment!!

Thanks again!!
Bill

Re: DEAR SCOTT

Barbara TX on 2/12/01 at 20:28 (038766)

Could you ever offer the PSC (Pronation Spring Control) Wrap by Fabrifoam on the Products Page? Seems like a lot of folks could benefit from a good product that avoids some of the tape troubles they seem to be having. I know the company is in Exton, PA 19341, but that's about it. Maybe you could stock it, along with bulk taping products and make some extra jackson. Thanks, B.

Re: DEAR SCOTT

Scott R on 2/12/01 at 21:13 (038768)

Barbara,
My last repsonse to this topic 21 days ago still applies so here's a repost of that response:

Thanks for the notice. They sent me a free PSC years ago. I like Dr. Roth's FABs better because there is a cushion 'bump' under the arch. I'll be selling one or both of them as soon as I can. Much bigger things are in the works.

The fabrifoam PSC has been listed [on the products page] at http://heelspurs.com for 3 or 4 years.

Re: Thanks

Julie on 2/13/01 at 02:03 (038789)

Bill, when you resume taping you could also experiment with different tapes. I'm sure they vary in the way and to the extent that they adhere, and it could be the tape itself that is causing the irritation. Whatever tape is used, it needs to be removed slowly and carefully.

The underwraps others have recommended sound good. You might also like to try using a healing cream on the soles of your feet overnight after you've removed the tape. Tea Tree cream is excellent, or any of the calendula based creams.

Re: Thanks

Bill E. on 2/13/01 at 07:58 (038803)

Julie,

It may have just been the way I taped one day or my activities that day or something. After a day of no taping, I am back to it and it feels OK. I am a little leary of healing creams or moisturizing creams because I have the impression (prejudice?) that they will soften the sole of my foot and that will make it more susceptible to the pulling of the tape. Maybe I am wrong about that aspect.

I don't think that it is the tape because it is only sore in a small area and on one foot though I taped both feet and over a significant area of skin. Actually the tape that I am using feels quite good. It doesn't seem to stretch as the day wears on and it goes on easily and comes off very cleanly with virtually no adhesive left on my feet.

I'll try a cream for a few days on your recommendation! ;-)
Bill

Re: Thanks

Julie on 2/13/01 at 08:27 (038805)

Bill, your tape sounds great. What is it called? Not that it's available here, I suppose.

Creams do soften the skin, so if you don't think you need to use one, ignore my suggestion. I'm glad the taping seems to be working again.

Julie

Re: DEAR SCOTT

Barbara TX on 2/13/01 at 09:25 (038808)

Sorry, Scott - that post must have escaped me! B.