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diagnosed with heel spur

Posted by Luis Hernandez on 2/22/01 at 00:29 (039617)

I was just been diagnosed with heel spur by my masseur. This man (not a doctor) has been very, very good as a masseur and, help me for about 5 years. My question is; is it possible to take care of the problem by hittig the heel spur with a wooden hammer and massaging afterword? he did that today, it hurt like hell but, I did notice that it felt better arterward. He said I he may have to do it once or twice more and I'll be ok. Is it possible or, will it get worst?
This man is across the border from El Paso, TX. He is in Juarez Mexico

Thanks very much.

Luis

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Christian Galvarino on 2/22/01 at 08:40 (039625)

Hola, Are you loco???????? Man you need to head for the border. First, the masseur is not a doctor and can not, can not , can not, can not, diagnose any medical problem. Second, if you have pain in the heel, hitting it with any type of hammer will only make your problem worse over time no matter what. If you read just about any of the posts on this board you will find that heel pain is very hard to control and relieve. I would not recommend under any circumstances that you let this quack hit your foot again. Massage could be a good idea on its own. But I wouldn't let this masseur with in the distance of the Panama Canal from me. Heres hoping you find another masseur.

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Steve P on 2/22/01 at 09:40 (039630)

Luis --- No way! Get to a podiatrist or a Sports Medicine clinic for a proper diagnosis & treatment. This is a medical problem & it needs proper medical attention. Do it soon.

Forget the masseur!

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Cynthia D on 2/22/01 at 11:22 (039642)

Run for the Border!!!! I had a masseur whom I completely trusted who for YEARS punched my heel insert point with an orange stick HARD. I guess he thought he was breaking up the heel spur. Maybe that was the time my heel spur was just beginning to grow. Had I gotten immediate MEDICAL treatment, from a DOCTOR, I wouldn't be in such bad shape today, unable to care for my house or children, unable to walk on the beach, unable to take my kids to the park or sledding.

I can say I was naive, and didn't even think it was anything serious enough to be seen by a doctor for until it lasted for two years, and then my second foot got it, too. Almost 5 years now. Don't wait, make haste to a doctor.

Re: WHAT????

Lori E. on 2/22/01 at 14:24 (039659)

I can't believe what I am reading! There is no way to cure a medical problem by hitting part of your anatomy with a hammer. I am sure you have had a good relationship with the person as attested by how long you have known him, but a masseur doesn't have the knowledge or training to cure your heelspur. Masseurs are supposed to relax your muscles and perhaps assist with flexability, not treat tendon and bone injuries.
Hammers are NOT the treatment for heelspurs. Please, please go see a medical professional who can diagnose and treat your ailment properly! Hopefully not too much damage has been done and it is not irreversable.
Best wishes for you.

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Aching head on 2/22/01 at 16:33 (039665)

Hey Luis,

I've to this same masseur, he's great isn't he. You had best hope that the next whack will work, because after that, he takes the hammer to the side of your head. Now that will take the pain away from your feet. I guarantee it.

Aching head

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Kay S on 2/22/01 at 18:30 (039675)

Dear Aching Head:
It's funny you mentioned that hammer to the head thing, because when I read the post about the hammer, that's exactly what I thought too. Sometimes the pain from pf makes one WANT a hammer to the head just to help forget the pf pain.
I have heard of that hammer thing with ganglion cysts, which are often found in the hands, but have NEVER heard of it in heels. My goodness, it is making me squirm just thinking about it!
Kay

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Aching Head on 2/22/01 at 23:30 (039699)

Actually I was thinking about the poor guy that had hurt himself bad, can't remember what it was. To relieve the pain he drilled holes into his head! It worked, the orginal pain was gone :*) I think he was nominated for a Darwin Award. Sorry if the humour offends anyone, we could all use a break, right!

Aching Head

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Julie on 2/23/01 at 01:22 (039704)

I recall Dr Z once explaining that ESWT works by starting a bleed, which kickstarts the healing process by stimulating the circulation to the area of the tear and inflammation. Perhaps Luis' masseur, understanding this aspect of the healing process, used the hammer for that purpose. I'm not defending him, but if that was his reasoning it doesn't sound totally loco.

Julie

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Cynthia D on 2/23/01 at 06:56 (039713)

And many people explain that ESWT feels like a sledgehammer. It sure did to me. Can the masseur wack you 3,000 times?

Re: If I had a hammer...

Barbara TX on 2/23/01 at 12:15 (039732)

Julie - that doesn't sound strange to me either, although it may be extreme. Dr. B. mentioned that, through severe stretching some therapists go for a 'controlled tear' of the PF, and what is a PF release but a sort of medical 'tear' in the PF (highly controlled, in most surgeries). Someone posted about their grandfather hitting his heel with a big kitchen spoon and completely solving his problem, and some doctors have given the advice of 'sprinting' briefly to cause a tear. The problem is, a hammer is about the least controlled implement of them all, and dense enough to break off a bone spur altogether - ouch. ESWT seems the most controlled way of re-injuring the area altogether, and you have the advantage of reinjuring the tissue at a cellular level, and cellular re-oxygenation is supposed to occur that probably won't occur with a hammer... Still, I do find myself magnetically attracted to the tool-box these days. B.

Re: If I had a hammer...

JudyS on 2/23/01 at 16:57 (039747)

Hi Julie, Hi TexBarb- I was 'listening in' on your conversation here and I wanted to share a thought. I'm pretty sure that my most significant improvement came last summer/fall when I was undergoing deep tissue massage with a physical therapist. I've heard this kind of massage is supposed to actually tear scar tissue, breaking it up and promoting the same kind of healing blood flow as you've described here - although my PT didn't say so. Anyway, that therapy was extremely painful so I wouldn't be surprised if he did actuate a sort of 'controlled' tear. I wonder if there could be a correlation drawn between the two kinds of treatments?

Re: If I had a hammer...

Barbara TX on 2/23/01 at 17:02 (039748)

Judy - yes I think that sort of massage is called myfascial release, but some chiropractors call it 'Rolfing' I think (it depends on the school where you learned it. It is called active release therapy by that guy in Colorado (ART). Whatever you call it, it CERTAINLY is painful enough to tear something. My chiro quit using his hands at a certain point and used a mechanical smasher that looked like a ball peen hammer fitted into a drill. Not many physical things make me CRY but that did! I always got better for about two days, and then much worse. My healing curve must have been too slow to withstand how frequently he did it (every other day). How frequently did you go to PT? B.

P.S. I am searching for the post you made to me the other day - lost it in the chaos around here!

Re: If I had a hammer...

Julie on 2/24/01 at 02:16 (039781)

Hi Barb and Judy

Interesting but not surprising that all these treatments - surgery, ESWT, ART, rolfing etc - work on the same healing principle. Ultrasound too kickstarts the healing process by stimulating circulation to the area, as does intrasound which I used - I think succcessfully - for a couple of months last Autumn. But the hammer is certainly the least subtle of them - Barb, please stay away from that tool box!

Re: If I had a hammer...

john h on 2/26/01 at 09:46 (039899)

we are going in circles! a few years ago someone suggested 'thumpers' for PF. sort of an electronic hammer.

Re: Thumpers

Julie on 2/27/01 at 01:58 (039961)

A precursor of ESWT, ahead of its time?

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Christian Galvarino on 2/22/01 at 08:40 (039625)

Hola, Are you loco???????? Man you need to head for the border. First, the masseur is not a doctor and can not, can not , can not, can not, diagnose any medical problem. Second, if you have pain in the heel, hitting it with any type of hammer will only make your problem worse over time no matter what. If you read just about any of the posts on this board you will find that heel pain is very hard to control and relieve. I would not recommend under any circumstances that you let this quack hit your foot again. Massage could be a good idea on its own. But I wouldn't let this masseur with in the distance of the Panama Canal from me. Heres hoping you find another masseur.

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Steve P on 2/22/01 at 09:40 (039630)

Luis --- No way! Get to a podiatrist or a Sports Medicine clinic for a proper diagnosis & treatment. This is a medical problem & it needs proper medical attention. Do it soon.

Forget the masseur!

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Cynthia D on 2/22/01 at 11:22 (039642)

Run for the Border!!!! I had a masseur whom I completely trusted who for YEARS punched my heel insert point with an orange stick HARD. I guess he thought he was breaking up the heel spur. Maybe that was the time my heel spur was just beginning to grow. Had I gotten immediate MEDICAL treatment, from a DOCTOR, I wouldn't be in such bad shape today, unable to care for my house or children, unable to walk on the beach, unable to take my kids to the park or sledding.

I can say I was naive, and didn't even think it was anything serious enough to be seen by a doctor for until it lasted for two years, and then my second foot got it, too. Almost 5 years now. Don't wait, make haste to a doctor.

Re: WHAT????

Lori E. on 2/22/01 at 14:24 (039659)

I can't believe what I am reading! There is no way to cure a medical problem by hitting part of your anatomy with a hammer. I am sure you have had a good relationship with the person as attested by how long you have known him, but a masseur doesn't have the knowledge or training to cure your heelspur. Masseurs are supposed to relax your muscles and perhaps assist with flexability, not treat tendon and bone injuries.
Hammers are NOT the treatment for heelspurs. Please, please go see a medical professional who can diagnose and treat your ailment properly! Hopefully not too much damage has been done and it is not irreversable.
Best wishes for you.

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Aching head on 2/22/01 at 16:33 (039665)

Hey Luis,

I've to this same masseur, he's great isn't he. You had best hope that the next whack will work, because after that, he takes the hammer to the side of your head. Now that will take the pain away from your feet. I guarantee it.

Aching head

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Kay S on 2/22/01 at 18:30 (039675)

Dear Aching Head:
It's funny you mentioned that hammer to the head thing, because when I read the post about the hammer, that's exactly what I thought too. Sometimes the pain from pf makes one WANT a hammer to the head just to help forget the pf pain.
I have heard of that hammer thing with ganglion cysts, which are often found in the hands, but have NEVER heard of it in heels. My goodness, it is making me squirm just thinking about it!
Kay

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Aching Head on 2/22/01 at 23:30 (039699)

Actually I was thinking about the poor guy that had hurt himself bad, can't remember what it was. To relieve the pain he drilled holes into his head! It worked, the orginal pain was gone :*) I think he was nominated for a Darwin Award. Sorry if the humour offends anyone, we could all use a break, right!

Aching Head

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Julie on 2/23/01 at 01:22 (039704)

I recall Dr Z once explaining that ESWT works by starting a bleed, which kickstarts the healing process by stimulating the circulation to the area of the tear and inflammation. Perhaps Luis' masseur, understanding this aspect of the healing process, used the hammer for that purpose. I'm not defending him, but if that was his reasoning it doesn't sound totally loco.

Julie

Re: diagnosed with heel spur

Cynthia D on 2/23/01 at 06:56 (039713)

And many people explain that ESWT feels like a sledgehammer. It sure did to me. Can the masseur wack you 3,000 times?

Re: If I had a hammer...

Barbara TX on 2/23/01 at 12:15 (039732)

Julie - that doesn't sound strange to me either, although it may be extreme. Dr. B. mentioned that, through severe stretching some therapists go for a 'controlled tear' of the PF, and what is a PF release but a sort of medical 'tear' in the PF (highly controlled, in most surgeries). Someone posted about their grandfather hitting his heel with a big kitchen spoon and completely solving his problem, and some doctors have given the advice of 'sprinting' briefly to cause a tear. The problem is, a hammer is about the least controlled implement of them all, and dense enough to break off a bone spur altogether - ouch. ESWT seems the most controlled way of re-injuring the area altogether, and you have the advantage of reinjuring the tissue at a cellular level, and cellular re-oxygenation is supposed to occur that probably won't occur with a hammer... Still, I do find myself magnetically attracted to the tool-box these days. B.

Re: If I had a hammer...

JudyS on 2/23/01 at 16:57 (039747)

Hi Julie, Hi TexBarb- I was 'listening in' on your conversation here and I wanted to share a thought. I'm pretty sure that my most significant improvement came last summer/fall when I was undergoing deep tissue massage with a physical therapist. I've heard this kind of massage is supposed to actually tear scar tissue, breaking it up and promoting the same kind of healing blood flow as you've described here - although my PT didn't say so. Anyway, that therapy was extremely painful so I wouldn't be surprised if he did actuate a sort of 'controlled' tear. I wonder if there could be a correlation drawn between the two kinds of treatments?

Re: If I had a hammer...

Barbara TX on 2/23/01 at 17:02 (039748)

Judy - yes I think that sort of massage is called myfascial release, but some chiropractors call it 'Rolfing' I think (it depends on the school where you learned it. It is called active release therapy by that guy in Colorado (ART). Whatever you call it, it CERTAINLY is painful enough to tear something. My chiro quit using his hands at a certain point and used a mechanical smasher that looked like a ball peen hammer fitted into a drill. Not many physical things make me CRY but that did! I always got better for about two days, and then much worse. My healing curve must have been too slow to withstand how frequently he did it (every other day). How frequently did you go to PT? B.

P.S. I am searching for the post you made to me the other day - lost it in the chaos around here!

Re: If I had a hammer...

Julie on 2/24/01 at 02:16 (039781)

Hi Barb and Judy

Interesting but not surprising that all these treatments - surgery, ESWT, ART, rolfing etc - work on the same healing principle. Ultrasound too kickstarts the healing process by stimulating circulation to the area, as does intrasound which I used - I think succcessfully - for a couple of months last Autumn. But the hammer is certainly the least subtle of them - Barb, please stay away from that tool box!

Re: If I had a hammer...

john h on 2/26/01 at 09:46 (039899)

we are going in circles! a few years ago someone suggested 'thumpers' for PF. sort of an electronic hammer.

Re: Thumpers

Julie on 2/27/01 at 01:58 (039961)

A precursor of ESWT, ahead of its time?