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Question on the formation of heelspurs

Posted by Eric on 2/26/01 at 23:07 (039957)

I've recently read a magazine in my podiatrists's office that explains how spurs form. I understand that the arch of the foot is like a bow without the arrow, that is held together by 3 layers of rubber bands (plantar fascia). When stressed by standing for too long, etc. the fascia, shrinks and pulls, forming a microscopic tear. By stretching, massaging, rolling the foot around, etc. brings blood to the area, allowing the the fascia to stretch back to size, therefore, avoiding this tear. If this fascia stretches from the toes to the heel, like it is depicted in the magazine, how does one get a spur in other areas such as the ankle? My other question is can you get this tear by overstretching as well? Thank you.

Re: Question on the formation of heelspurs

Dr. Zuckerman on 2/27/01 at 06:50 (039973)

Hi,

The formation of spurs or calcifications at the attachment of the plantar fascia is due to micro tears of this very thick and broad band of tissue.

The body lays down bone (calcification-spur) when there is trauma to the area. The plantar fascia supports more then 125,000 lbs of weight during one day of just walking .

Stretching increases blood to the foot. It also helps to increase the flexibility and strenght of the very important surrounding tendons.

You can stretch the plantar fascia. You can stretch the surrounding tendons such as the achilles tendon and other plantar tendons.

Yes stretching can damage the foot if it isn't done properly and it done too much.

Re: Question on the formation of heelspurs

Eric on 2/27/01 at 13:26 (040006)

How does an ankle spur form though, Dr. Zuckerman? Thanks

Re: Question on the formation of heelspurs

Dr. Zuckerman on 2/27/01 at 06:50 (039973)

Hi,

The formation of spurs or calcifications at the attachment of the plantar fascia is due to micro tears of this very thick and broad band of tissue.

The body lays down bone (calcification-spur) when there is trauma to the area. The plantar fascia supports more then 125,000 lbs of weight during one day of just walking .

Stretching increases blood to the foot. It also helps to increase the flexibility and strenght of the very important surrounding tendons.

You can stretch the plantar fascia. You can stretch the surrounding tendons such as the achilles tendon and other plantar tendons.

Yes stretching can damage the foot if it isn't done properly and it done too much.

Re: Question on the formation of heelspurs

Eric on 2/27/01 at 13:26 (040006)

How does an ankle spur form though, Dr. Zuckerman? Thanks