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I don't have time for this.

Posted by Valeris S on 3/21/01 at hrmin (042116)

The longer this pain goes on, the more I realize the longer it goes on.

I just got a promotion in November, am now assistant manager in a face-pasted customer service business. I am on my feet all day; no sit-down work for Valerie. 6 months into this pain, and I am ready to drop. I can't continue, hammering my feet against the floor & torturing myself.

I am a dedicated employee and feel guilty for missing work. I am on a 2 week leave w/physical therapy, hoping this will help me get better. Even though I hope this will cure me, I have no indication that it will. I am running out of options... my coworker who had the surgery is pushing me toward 'getting it over with,' has convinced my boss that this is the only way. He has reminded me that I have 12 weeks total time off work (FMLA), and that he doesn't want me to mess around... I want this over with, too.

I read all the great reviews about ESWT, but fear that I am not a candidate because I am overweight, and it probably will be denied by my insurance anyways. I am getting desperate... I can't go on like this at work, don't want to give up the benefits and great pay. I have always worked on my feet and don't understand why they have failed me now (is it really just from the concrete floors??). I am seeking a 2nd opinion (and maybe some hope & compassion) soon, and working hard at my PT...

I know there is nothing more I can do right now. Should I just go back to work and walk through the pain until I can find a way out of this?

Re: I don't have time for this.

Dr. Zuckerman on 3/21/01 at 21:33 (042123)

Here are the options.

1. Get ESWT done
2. Pay for the ESWT

3. If can't afford have it done anyway. If still can't afford enter the Dr. Z lotto . The end of the month is very close.

Let's look at it this way if you have chronic heel pain at the insertional of the heel . You have a 30-40 % change of cure with one shot and another 30-40% chance of significant improvement with one or two shots with the ESWT machine.

Re: Dr. Z: are those the EWST %'s? Confused.

Beverly on 3/21/01 at 21:54 (042128)

Dr. Z.,

That 30-40% cure rate you mentioned with shots and then in the same sentence referred to EWST? Does that mean EWST has a 30-40% cure rate? I was hoping it was better than that. But maybe I just misunderstood you.
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: What is the Dr. Z lotto?

Valerie S on 3/21/01 at hrmin (042130)

What is the Dr. Z lotto, and how do I enter?

I live in Grand Rapids, Michigan... the closest place listed here that offers ESWT is 3 hours from my home (near Detroit)... Do I ask my doctor about this & try to get a referral, or do I just call the people directly? Just wondering: I'm sure I can figure this all out by calling for myself. But is it a good idea to be working with a local doctor, or will I have to do the ESWT as a totally separate part of my treatment?

Is it possible that there might be someone in (or closer to) Grand Rapids that does it that is not listed on this website, and how would I find out?

Re: The Dr. Z lotto

Lori E. on 3/21/01 at 22:49 (042133)

Valerie,
The lotto is a drawing Dr. Z does every month to give away free ESWT treatment. I am one of the lucky winners!
All you have to do is to send a postcard to Dr. Z office stating that it is a Orbasone lotto entry. The address is on the link for Dr. Z at the top of the ESWT page.
They will put your card in with the others recieved. At the end of the month someone in Dr. Z's office draws the winner and notifies you by the board.
You have nothing to loose but the cost of a stamp and a post card. If you don't win, your card is left with the others to be drawn from again the next month.
I can say that I am very grateful that I won my treatment. I have made two visits to Dr. Z to get ESWT done. (Both covered by my lotto win.) I am making progress and hope to be much better by summer. Hopefully you will be a winner too!

Re: The Dr. Z lotto

Lori E. on 3/21/01 at 22:51 (042135)

Sorry, Dr. Z's info is a link at the top of the Ask the Foot Doctors board.

Re: I don't have time for this.

Julie on 3/22/01 at 03:32 (042150)

Hi Valerie

You sound desperate, and I don't blame you. You're only four months into a new job, you don't want to give it up, but you're in so much pain that you feel you can't go on, and you know the pain isn't going to go away unless you change your working conditions or the job itself. I know that's putting it starkly, but that is the situation and it's better to face it than not.

First. You cannot hope to 'walk through' the pain. This website is littered with the corpses of people who have tried that and ended up with chronic PF. Maybe lifelong pain. You don't want to be in that category, so that's not an option.

Second. Being on your feet on concrete floors, long term, was almost certainly a contributory cause of your PF, if not the only cause. You answer your own question when you say you've always worked on your feet but don't understand why they've failed you.

Third. You must not feel guilty for missing work. This is an illness, and you are treating it. That is taking responsibility, not playing hooky. But two weeks is not going to cure you.

Fourth. Your co-worker who had the surgery and has 'convinced' your boss that this is the only way is butting in where he has no business butting in. These are YOUR FEET and it is your life, and what you do now is up to you.I'm not clear if it's your boss or your co-worker who 'doesn't want to mess around' and is holding the 12 weeks over you, but whoever it is, you must reject that pressure. If it's your co-worker, perhaps should be wondering whether this person is really being a helpful friend. If it's the boss, perhaps you need to consider whether staying with such a boss is worth the great pay and benefits. There are other bosses, other jobs, out there.

Steve said a few days ago that the job might have to go, and it might. Or there might be a way of holding on to it without wrecking your feet and possibly your life. Only you can decide. But you do have to decide.

As for ESWT, I can only echo the options Dr Z gave you. Go for it. Certainly do it before surgery. Even if it doesn't work, it won't leave you with worse problems, as surgery could. And surgery would still be an option.

I'm aware that the above sounds harsh, and perhaps unsympathetic. I'm not. I want you to sort this out, and I hope putting it all so starkly will help you get some clarity on the situation. But, of course, I'm not in your shoes, and if I'm way off base, just ignore me!

Whatever you decide, I wish you a full recovery and a good life.

All the best

Julie

Re: I don't have time for this.

Valerie S on 3/22/01 at hrmin (042157)

Thank you, Julie for reading my mind and translating my emotional chaos into such a straight-forward report of facts. I really do appreciate it. I am struggling right now, and I know that something's gotta give... unfortunately it will probably end up being my job. This is so depressing.

But is it really a sacrifice? I am already sacrificing my well-being and possibly my future working there...

Thank you so much for putting it to me so bluntly. I needed that.

-Val.

Re: It seems you do! Good!

Julie on 3/22/01 at 08:51 (042161)

Hi Valerie

I'm really glad I was able to be of help - and it's nice of you to tell me so. Thanks for the thanks (here we go again!)

It probably does come down to a straight choice between your job and your well-being. But before you resign, it might be worth putting your firm to the test. Once you decide that you're prepared to quit, you'll lose nothing by trying to gain support from your boss. If he values you and wants to keep you, he should be willing to meet you more than half way, respect your choices as to how you deal with your problem, and be flexible with your working conditions and sick leave until it's dealt with. Put it to him, and you might just get a pleasant surprise. If not, if he's unsympathetic and unco-operative, then leave - hopefully without regrets - and look forward to a better job and more suitable working conditions elsewhere.

I had this on my mind before I posted my last, but didn't want to go into the subtleties until you were clearer about the choice you have to make.

Take care

Julie

Re: Dr. Z: are those the EWST %'s? Confused.

Dr. Zuckerman on 3/22/01 at 08:52 (042162)

What I am saying is that the patient will get 100% pain relief in 30-40% of the cases and in another 30-40% will great dramatic relief. So in summary about 75-80% will get complete cure of pain or dramatic relief. That is a very good percentage . The different between cure and dramtic relief is that cure means means no pain at all and dramatic relief means some pain at time but very happy with the treatment and the relief.

Re: I don't have time for this.

Dr. Zuckerman on 3/21/01 at 21:33 (042123)

Here are the options.

1. Get ESWT done
2. Pay for the ESWT

3. If can't afford have it done anyway. If still can't afford enter the Dr. Z lotto . The end of the month is very close.

Let's look at it this way if you have chronic heel pain at the insertional of the heel . You have a 30-40 % change of cure with one shot and another 30-40% chance of significant improvement with one or two shots with the ESWT machine.

Re: Dr. Z: are those the EWST %'s? Confused.

Beverly on 3/21/01 at 21:54 (042128)

Dr. Z.,

That 30-40% cure rate you mentioned with shots and then in the same sentence referred to EWST? Does that mean EWST has a 30-40% cure rate? I was hoping it was better than that. But maybe I just misunderstood you.
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: What is the Dr. Z lotto?

Valerie S on 3/21/01 at hrmin (042130)

What is the Dr. Z lotto, and how do I enter?

I live in Grand Rapids, Michigan... the closest place listed here that offers ESWT is 3 hours from my home (near Detroit)... Do I ask my doctor about this & try to get a referral, or do I just call the people directly? Just wondering: I'm sure I can figure this all out by calling for myself. But is it a good idea to be working with a local doctor, or will I have to do the ESWT as a totally separate part of my treatment?

Is it possible that there might be someone in (or closer to) Grand Rapids that does it that is not listed on this website, and how would I find out?

Re: The Dr. Z lotto

Lori E. on 3/21/01 at 22:49 (042133)

Valerie,
The lotto is a drawing Dr. Z does every month to give away free ESWT treatment. I am one of the lucky winners!
All you have to do is to send a postcard to Dr. Z office stating that it is a Orbasone lotto entry. The address is on the link for Dr. Z at the top of the ESWT page.
They will put your card in with the others recieved. At the end of the month someone in Dr. Z's office draws the winner and notifies you by the board.
You have nothing to loose but the cost of a stamp and a post card. If you don't win, your card is left with the others to be drawn from again the next month.
I can say that I am very grateful that I won my treatment. I have made two visits to Dr. Z to get ESWT done. (Both covered by my lotto win.) I am making progress and hope to be much better by summer. Hopefully you will be a winner too!

Re: The Dr. Z lotto

Lori E. on 3/21/01 at 22:51 (042135)

Sorry, Dr. Z's info is a link at the top of the Ask the Foot Doctors board.

Re: I don't have time for this.

Julie on 3/22/01 at 03:32 (042150)

Hi Valerie

You sound desperate, and I don't blame you. You're only four months into a new job, you don't want to give it up, but you're in so much pain that you feel you can't go on, and you know the pain isn't going to go away unless you change your working conditions or the job itself. I know that's putting it starkly, but that is the situation and it's better to face it than not.

First. You cannot hope to 'walk through' the pain. This website is littered with the corpses of people who have tried that and ended up with chronic PF. Maybe lifelong pain. You don't want to be in that category, so that's not an option.

Second. Being on your feet on concrete floors, long term, was almost certainly a contributory cause of your PF, if not the only cause. You answer your own question when you say you've always worked on your feet but don't understand why they've failed you.

Third. You must not feel guilty for missing work. This is an illness, and you are treating it. That is taking responsibility, not playing hooky. But two weeks is not going to cure you.

Fourth. Your co-worker who had the surgery and has 'convinced' your boss that this is the only way is butting in where he has no business butting in. These are YOUR FEET and it is your life, and what you do now is up to you.I'm not clear if it's your boss or your co-worker who 'doesn't want to mess around' and is holding the 12 weeks over you, but whoever it is, you must reject that pressure. If it's your co-worker, perhaps should be wondering whether this person is really being a helpful friend. If it's the boss, perhaps you need to consider whether staying with such a boss is worth the great pay and benefits. There are other bosses, other jobs, out there.

Steve said a few days ago that the job might have to go, and it might. Or there might be a way of holding on to it without wrecking your feet and possibly your life. Only you can decide. But you do have to decide.

As for ESWT, I can only echo the options Dr Z gave you. Go for it. Certainly do it before surgery. Even if it doesn't work, it won't leave you with worse problems, as surgery could. And surgery would still be an option.

I'm aware that the above sounds harsh, and perhaps unsympathetic. I'm not. I want you to sort this out, and I hope putting it all so starkly will help you get some clarity on the situation. But, of course, I'm not in your shoes, and if I'm way off base, just ignore me!

Whatever you decide, I wish you a full recovery and a good life.

All the best

Julie

Re: I don't have time for this.

Valerie S on 3/22/01 at hrmin (042157)

Thank you, Julie for reading my mind and translating my emotional chaos into such a straight-forward report of facts. I really do appreciate it. I am struggling right now, and I know that something's gotta give... unfortunately it will probably end up being my job. This is so depressing.

But is it really a sacrifice? I am already sacrificing my well-being and possibly my future working there...

Thank you so much for putting it to me so bluntly. I needed that.

-Val.

Re: It seems you do! Good!

Julie on 3/22/01 at 08:51 (042161)

Hi Valerie

I'm really glad I was able to be of help - and it's nice of you to tell me so. Thanks for the thanks (here we go again!)

It probably does come down to a straight choice between your job and your well-being. But before you resign, it might be worth putting your firm to the test. Once you decide that you're prepared to quit, you'll lose nothing by trying to gain support from your boss. If he values you and wants to keep you, he should be willing to meet you more than half way, respect your choices as to how you deal with your problem, and be flexible with your working conditions and sick leave until it's dealt with. Put it to him, and you might just get a pleasant surprise. If not, if he's unsympathetic and unco-operative, then leave - hopefully without regrets - and look forward to a better job and more suitable working conditions elsewhere.

I had this on my mind before I posted my last, but didn't want to go into the subtleties until you were clearer about the choice you have to make.

Take care

Julie

Re: Dr. Z: are those the EWST %'s? Confused.

Dr. Zuckerman on 3/22/01 at 08:52 (042162)

What I am saying is that the patient will get 100% pain relief in 30-40% of the cases and in another 30-40% will great dramatic relief. So in summary about 75-80% will get complete cure of pain or dramatic relief. That is a very good percentage . The different between cure and dramtic relief is that cure means means no pain at all and dramatic relief means some pain at time but very happy with the treatment and the relief.