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footwear

Posted by eileenc on 3/25/01 at 07:59 (042394)

What do you recommend for footwear? After an unsuccesful tt release the pain is not only under the anklebone but has now extended down into the arch and to the sole under heel. I have orthotics but they press up into the arch and even though they are made of a nonplastic softer material they are still too hard. The only shoes I can wear are low-slung tennis shoes because any 'normal' shoe comes up too far and presses against the scar from my operation. Any ideas?

Re: footwear

wendyn on 3/25/01 at 12:11 (042409)

Eileen - I have this same problem but I haven't had the surgery. Birkenstock sandals seem to work well for many of us-and because they're a sanda they don't cause any problems with pressure by your ankle. Have you tried them?

Re: footwear

eileenc on 3/26/01 at 07:58 (042491)

Thanks. Isn't the footbed of the Birkenstock hard? Also, doesn't the strap go right over the tarsal tunnel area? As I sit here looking at snow out my window I think, how can you wear sandals in the winter? You haven't had the surgery? how do you deal with this?

Re: footwear

wendyn on 3/26/01 at 08:11 (042493)

Eileen - most Birkenstock footbeds are very hard - but they do sell a few with a softer padded foot bed - a good place to start. After about 8 months in those I found I could tolerate the harder shoe and needed more support (I find the softer ones too soft now). Many of the Birk sandals come without a strap - so there isn't anything rubbing by your ankle.

I live in Calgary - and I managed through two winters in basically nothing but Birks and sandals. They are not good on ice - so I had to be careful when outside. I always had a change of socks with me - and I carry boots in the car in case I actually need to get out and walk in the snow if I get stuck.

I manage!

Re: footwear

eileenc on 3/27/01 at 07:53 (042613)

Wendy: Thanks again. I will go looking for the Birks. Since you have not had the surgery, do you put your foot in ice-cube water every day to reduce the swelling? The literature I have read seems to indicate that if you continue to walk/stand on it at all the problem will get worse. Have you found this to be true? I so much miss exercising--especially the 5 to 15 miles I used to walk every week. You seem to have done the most research of anyone. Have you ever been on Pain.com? They have good scientific articles sometimes.

Re: footwear

wendyn on 3/27/01 at 08:23 (042617)

Hmmm - I don't know where I've been - everywhere. Yes I've done a lot of research - some has said what you have found, that it will only get worse. However, that has not been the case for me - and it is only one opinion. I have also read a lot that says that a standard TTS release is often a 50/50 shot at best for improvement. Whether or not someone can find relief from surgery really seems to depend on what is wrong with their feet in the first place. Many surgeons are now only doing a TTS surgery if there is a mass in the tunnel causing compression. But while the jury is still out on all of this, I am going to err on the side of caution (that and my well respected foot and ankle surgeon told me that there's no way he wanted to go in when he could only give me 50/50 at best with a real risk of making me worse).

When my feet were really bad I used to do the ice water thing because it was the only thing that kept me from losing my mind. Ice water right up to about 2 inchees or more above the ankles. About 4 times a day. Gross - I don't think I could even do that now.

Later I used to just use the frozen peas or gel packs. I am very rarely uncomfortable enough to ice now.

Good orthotics, Birks, acupuncture, and the stretching in yoga (carefully) as well as lots of time has done wonders for me. I take B12 - no more jogging (ever) no more high impact aerobics.

I can go 25 minutes cardio (hard) on a recumbent bike now and feel great afterwards. 1 year ago I was lucky if I could do 5 minutes slowly.

I miss the jogging and aerobics - but I'm working back towards hopefully the long walks again one day.

(I've had this for about 2.5 years)

Re: footwear

Bob R on 3/27/01 at hrmin (042704)

I had the exact same result from my TTS surgery.
Gel insoles by Dr Kiper and cutting away the TT area the Wilson DST tennis shoe have helped the most.

Re: footwear

eileenc on 3/28/01 at 07:39 (042767)

Tried gelpacs---no help for me. You actually cut out your tennis shoes? do you just make a hole in them or do you cut out a u-shaped area including the upper edge? It is th eupper edge which cuts into my tt area.

Re: footwear

eileenc on 3/28/01 at 08:06 (042772)

Wendy
Yep--ice water once a day has helped enormously. Did the heel cords down the back of your heel tighten up after you did this? I do use ice packs on it at night (when I sleep) if it is acting up.
I tried acupucture--no help. I have tried yoga but can only do the easiest of moves because of a back injury. Dr. in a pain clinic (where I was originally sent because none of the orthopedic surgeons wanted to do tts with the 50% success rate and told me to learn to live with the pain) decided to 'unlock my left sacroiliac' and instead severely sprained that area and partially herniated a disc.
I did get orthotics at the Cleveland Clinic but they were designed for plantar fasciitis as the orthopod I saw said that he did not believe in TT. They cause excruciating pain. Are your orthotics hard or soft? Full or 3/4?
I have heard about B12 and I take some in a multivitamin. How much do you take?
My symptoms started about 4 1/2 years ago after a minor sprain. there is no doubt that I have scar tissue in the TT area because it was opened up 3 1/2 years ago by a podiatrist --- who I think panicked when he saw how bad it was. he did not know how to do a proper tts.
Be thankful that the internet affords all of us this opportunity to learn. When this first happened to me there was NOTHING online about this problem!

Re: footwear

wendyn on 3/25/01 at 12:11 (042409)

Eileen - I have this same problem but I haven't had the surgery. Birkenstock sandals seem to work well for many of us-and because they're a sanda they don't cause any problems with pressure by your ankle. Have you tried them?

Re: footwear

eileenc on 3/26/01 at 07:58 (042491)

Thanks. Isn't the footbed of the Birkenstock hard? Also, doesn't the strap go right over the tarsal tunnel area? As I sit here looking at snow out my window I think, how can you wear sandals in the winter? You haven't had the surgery? how do you deal with this?

Re: footwear

wendyn on 3/26/01 at 08:11 (042493)

Eileen - most Birkenstock footbeds are very hard - but they do sell a few with a softer padded foot bed - a good place to start. After about 8 months in those I found I could tolerate the harder shoe and needed more support (I find the softer ones too soft now). Many of the Birk sandals come without a strap - so there isn't anything rubbing by your ankle.

I live in Calgary - and I managed through two winters in basically nothing but Birks and sandals. They are not good on ice - so I had to be careful when outside. I always had a change of socks with me - and I carry boots in the car in case I actually need to get out and walk in the snow if I get stuck.

I manage!

Re: footwear

eileenc on 3/27/01 at 07:53 (042613)

Wendy: Thanks again. I will go looking for the Birks. Since you have not had the surgery, do you put your foot in ice-cube water every day to reduce the swelling? The literature I have read seems to indicate that if you continue to walk/stand on it at all the problem will get worse. Have you found this to be true? I so much miss exercising--especially the 5 to 15 miles I used to walk every week. You seem to have done the most research of anyone. Have you ever been on Pain.com? They have good scientific articles sometimes.

Re: footwear

wendyn on 3/27/01 at 08:23 (042617)

Hmmm - I don't know where I've been - everywhere. Yes I've done a lot of research - some has said what you have found, that it will only get worse. However, that has not been the case for me - and it is only one opinion. I have also read a lot that says that a standard TTS release is often a 50/50 shot at best for improvement. Whether or not someone can find relief from surgery really seems to depend on what is wrong with their feet in the first place. Many surgeons are now only doing a TTS surgery if there is a mass in the tunnel causing compression. But while the jury is still out on all of this, I am going to err on the side of caution (that and my well respected foot and ankle surgeon told me that there's no way he wanted to go in when he could only give me 50/50 at best with a real risk of making me worse).

When my feet were really bad I used to do the ice water thing because it was the only thing that kept me from losing my mind. Ice water right up to about 2 inchees or more above the ankles. About 4 times a day. Gross - I don't think I could even do that now.

Later I used to just use the frozen peas or gel packs. I am very rarely uncomfortable enough to ice now.

Good orthotics, Birks, acupuncture, and the stretching in yoga (carefully) as well as lots of time has done wonders for me. I take B12 - no more jogging (ever) no more high impact aerobics.

I can go 25 minutes cardio (hard) on a recumbent bike now and feel great afterwards. 1 year ago I was lucky if I could do 5 minutes slowly.

I miss the jogging and aerobics - but I'm working back towards hopefully the long walks again one day.

(I've had this for about 2.5 years)

Re: footwear

Bob R on 3/27/01 at hrmin (042704)

I had the exact same result from my TTS surgery.
Gel insoles by Dr Kiper and cutting away the TT area the Wilson DST tennis shoe have helped the most.

Re: footwear

eileenc on 3/28/01 at 07:39 (042767)

Tried gelpacs---no help for me. You actually cut out your tennis shoes? do you just make a hole in them or do you cut out a u-shaped area including the upper edge? It is th eupper edge which cuts into my tt area.

Re: footwear

eileenc on 3/28/01 at 08:06 (042772)

Wendy
Yep--ice water once a day has helped enormously. Did the heel cords down the back of your heel tighten up after you did this? I do use ice packs on it at night (when I sleep) if it is acting up.
I tried acupucture--no help. I have tried yoga but can only do the easiest of moves because of a back injury. Dr. in a pain clinic (where I was originally sent because none of the orthopedic surgeons wanted to do tts with the 50% success rate and told me to learn to live with the pain) decided to 'unlock my left sacroiliac' and instead severely sprained that area and partially herniated a disc.
I did get orthotics at the Cleveland Clinic but they were designed for plantar fasciitis as the orthopod I saw said that he did not believe in TT. They cause excruciating pain. Are your orthotics hard or soft? Full or 3/4?
I have heard about B12 and I take some in a multivitamin. How much do you take?
My symptoms started about 4 1/2 years ago after a minor sprain. there is no doubt that I have scar tissue in the TT area because it was opened up 3 1/2 years ago by a podiatrist --- who I think panicked when he saw how bad it was. he did not know how to do a proper tts.
Be thankful that the internet affords all of us this opportunity to learn. When this first happened to me there was NOTHING online about this problem!