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Heat

Posted by Linda F on 3/25/01 at 21:19 (042457)

I like putting my PF foot on a heating pad. It feels good and I beleive is helping me. I was told ice over heat was the way to go. but I find heat more helpful.

Also, I have a night splint. I have put a large square of moleskin on the plastic bottom part, so when I make a bathroom trip in the middle of the night I do not slip or fall. This works good for me and thot I would share the tip!!

Re: Heat

Bill E. on 3/26/01 at hrmin (042521)

This raises a question that has been plagueing me since I started to read about PF. But it will take some discussion to get to the final question. Maybe this will stimulate some dialogue among more knowlegeable folks reading these!!

My understanding is that cold is indicated to reduce swelling. So if you have an injury that is primarily due to swelling cold is the way to go. For example, something like carpal tunnel syndrome. On the other hand heat is indicated when you want to draw blood to an area. Thus, if you want to repair minor tears in a muscle or reduce discoloration from a bruise you should use heat. That is why the recommended treatment for many injuries is to chill it immediately after the injury and then apply heat a day or two later. Stop the immediate swelling and foster repair later.

That brings me to my question. What is PF? I have read that it is swelling around the plantar fascia and I have read that it is a set of small tears in the fascia. Now, I understand that the small tears may well cause swelling which causes pain. However, if PF is a bunch of little tears then heat would be indicated to facilitate the repair. Though the heat might cause increases swelling with an associated increase in pain. So there may well be opposing indications and opposing preferences. In all cases, rest is probably the most important thing for healing. But rest alone may not solve underlying causes of PF, such as biomechanical issues.

In my case, the PF is not too painful and I am almost compulsive about healing and full recovery. So I am willing to put up with a little more pain if I can get the damned PF to heal sooner!! I haven't tried direct application of heat but one of my favorites is to stretch and massage my feet in a very hot sauna! That feels so good!!! and seems to make things feel better later in the day too.

Well, I hope that there are experts in medicine or physiology who can shed some light on this subject!

Bill

Re: Heat

Beverly on 3/26/01 at 13:49 (042533)

Personally, I like the combo: ice followed by moist heat. I have always heard doctors rail against dry heat (plain heating pad heat). I have a moist heating pad. You can get a cheap one that comes with a thin sponge you wet, wring out and put in the heating pad. I spent some extra buck to get an automatic moist heating pad that does not require me to wet a sponge. It feels like a mini version of the kind used in PT. I love mine. I feel safer with it, because it always made me nervous to wet the sponge liner and put it in the heating pad. This way, the heating pad creates it's own moisture.
I got mine at a medical supply store for $65.00. It was expensive but worth every penny. An enterprising person could probably find it cheaper off the net.
Beverly

Re: Heat

Pam R. on 3/26/01 at 22:47 (042597)

Want a cheaper way to get moist heat Make it yourself. Choose Flannel material and you can make a pillow from it. Use long grain rice mirowave it (depending on size ) from 2 to 4 minutes. It stays warm a long time ,is easy to make and is the best moist heat for the price. You can also add your favorite herb, lavender, rosemary, but it's not necessary. I wouldn't be without my rice bag. I made them in several sizes for different areas of the body ,since I suffer from Fibromyalgia. I have a small one that also stays in my purse. Almost anyplace you go has a microwave and you would not believe how great they work. Just a tip from Pam --hope everyone tries it!!!

Re: Heat

john h on 3/27/01 at 10:58 (042634)

after ice is applied and removed blood rushes into the area to facilitate healing. after a work out i use ice for about 20 minutes and then hop into the whirlpool and put my feet directly under the jets (pool temp around 110 degrees).

there are various explanations of what causes the pain we experience with PF but no scientific evidence to validate that there is one and only one cause of PF pain. I suspect there are several reasons for pain depending on the individual and therefore treatments that are successful will vary from person to person. PF is a most difficult disease to cure and to find the pain generator is like trying to catch the wind in a fish net.

Re: Heat

JudyS on 3/27/01 at 11:33 (042646)

Pam - What a clever idea for heat! I was wondering, how does the rice-bag produce 'moist' heat?

Re: Heat

john a on 3/27/01 at 11:48 (042649)

This looks interesting, but I'm not clear on something. Doesn't the rice get sort of cooked and, well, 'grody' after a while? Or are you supposed to replace the rice after use?

Re: Heat

wendyn on 3/27/01 at 17:30 (042689)

Actually John - best to take the foot rice - toss with a little emu and oil - makes a lovely little side dish.

Seriously - I believe the rice is dry (correct me if I'm wrong here) but I also understand that if you over heat them they can start on fire so you have to be careful.

Re: Heat

Julie on 3/28/01 at 01:27 (042749)

John, what an inspired analogy - like trying to catch the wind in a fishnet. I love it! A good start to my day, thank you.

Re: Heat

john a on 3/28/01 at 07:57 (042771)

I thought perhaps microwaving them dry was the method too, but then, as someone else brought up, where does the 'moist heat' come from.

Re: Heat

Bill E. on 3/26/01 at hrmin (042521)

This raises a question that has been plagueing me since I started to read about PF. But it will take some discussion to get to the final question. Maybe this will stimulate some dialogue among more knowlegeable folks reading these!!

My understanding is that cold is indicated to reduce swelling. So if you have an injury that is primarily due to swelling cold is the way to go. For example, something like carpal tunnel syndrome. On the other hand heat is indicated when you want to draw blood to an area. Thus, if you want to repair minor tears in a muscle or reduce discoloration from a bruise you should use heat. That is why the recommended treatment for many injuries is to chill it immediately after the injury and then apply heat a day or two later. Stop the immediate swelling and foster repair later.

That brings me to my question. What is PF? I have read that it is swelling around the plantar fascia and I have read that it is a set of small tears in the fascia. Now, I understand that the small tears may well cause swelling which causes pain. However, if PF is a bunch of little tears then heat would be indicated to facilitate the repair. Though the heat might cause increases swelling with an associated increase in pain. So there may well be opposing indications and opposing preferences. In all cases, rest is probably the most important thing for healing. But rest alone may not solve underlying causes of PF, such as biomechanical issues.

In my case, the PF is not too painful and I am almost compulsive about healing and full recovery. So I am willing to put up with a little more pain if I can get the damned PF to heal sooner!! I haven't tried direct application of heat but one of my favorites is to stretch and massage my feet in a very hot sauna! That feels so good!!! and seems to make things feel better later in the day too.

Well, I hope that there are experts in medicine or physiology who can shed some light on this subject!

Bill

Re: Heat

Beverly on 3/26/01 at 13:49 (042533)

Personally, I like the combo: ice followed by moist heat. I have always heard doctors rail against dry heat (plain heating pad heat). I have a moist heating pad. You can get a cheap one that comes with a thin sponge you wet, wring out and put in the heating pad. I spent some extra buck to get an automatic moist heating pad that does not require me to wet a sponge. It feels like a mini version of the kind used in PT. I love mine. I feel safer with it, because it always made me nervous to wet the sponge liner and put it in the heating pad. This way, the heating pad creates it's own moisture.
I got mine at a medical supply store for $65.00. It was expensive but worth every penny. An enterprising person could probably find it cheaper off the net.
Beverly

Re: Heat

Pam R. on 3/26/01 at 22:47 (042597)

Want a cheaper way to get moist heat Make it yourself. Choose Flannel material and you can make a pillow from it. Use long grain rice mirowave it (depending on size ) from 2 to 4 minutes. It stays warm a long time ,is easy to make and is the best moist heat for the price. You can also add your favorite herb, lavender, rosemary, but it's not necessary. I wouldn't be without my rice bag. I made them in several sizes for different areas of the body ,since I suffer from Fibromyalgia. I have a small one that also stays in my purse. Almost anyplace you go has a microwave and you would not believe how great they work. Just a tip from Pam --hope everyone tries it!!!

Re: Heat

john h on 3/27/01 at 10:58 (042634)

after ice is applied and removed blood rushes into the area to facilitate healing. after a work out i use ice for about 20 minutes and then hop into the whirlpool and put my feet directly under the jets (pool temp around 110 degrees).

there are various explanations of what causes the pain we experience with PF but no scientific evidence to validate that there is one and only one cause of PF pain. I suspect there are several reasons for pain depending on the individual and therefore treatments that are successful will vary from person to person. PF is a most difficult disease to cure and to find the pain generator is like trying to catch the wind in a fish net.

Re: Heat

JudyS on 3/27/01 at 11:33 (042646)

Pam - What a clever idea for heat! I was wondering, how does the rice-bag produce 'moist' heat?

Re: Heat

john a on 3/27/01 at 11:48 (042649)

This looks interesting, but I'm not clear on something. Doesn't the rice get sort of cooked and, well, 'grody' after a while? Or are you supposed to replace the rice after use?

Re: Heat

wendyn on 3/27/01 at 17:30 (042689)

Actually John - best to take the foot rice - toss with a little emu and oil - makes a lovely little side dish.

Seriously - I believe the rice is dry (correct me if I'm wrong here) but I also understand that if you over heat them they can start on fire so you have to be careful.

Re: Heat

Julie on 3/28/01 at 01:27 (042749)

John, what an inspired analogy - like trying to catch the wind in a fishnet. I love it! A good start to my day, thank you.

Re: Heat

john a on 3/28/01 at 07:57 (042771)

I thought perhaps microwaving them dry was the method too, but then, as someone else brought up, where does the 'moist heat' come from.