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PF Surgery

Posted by Brendan F on 3/26/01 at 12:06 (042520)

I have had PF for 9 months now. The Pain is a 4 on a scale to 10. It started as a 9. I've been gradually (veeeerrryy slowly) getting somewhat better. It seems, however, that I've stalled at the '4' on a scale to 10 in pain for about 4 months. I just had my first cortisone shots (I've had 2 - one today and the first two weeks ago). My (new) Pod is prescribing we limit the cortisone to these two shots. He has me wearing that (ski boot of a) night splint, and he has me going to Physical therapy 3X week for the next month (my first PT appointment is this Friday). He is saying that if I don't get better with this treatment that I maight want to consider surgery. He defined surgery as a 10 minte outpatient procedure where he would detach the Plantar Fascia from my heel. Has anyone out there had these procedure done? It sounds pretty simple, however, I'm cautious & skeptical of anyone taking a blade to my foot (it's actually done with arthroscopic equipment). Advise / comments please. Signed...a majorly frustrated jock who used to play every sport regularly.

Re: PF Surgery

john h on 3/27/01 at 08:29 (042620)

it is no simple surgery brendan and as you are improving i would not consider surgery for some time. in any event do not let him totally detach the fascia from the heel.

Re: PF Surgery

Brian G on 3/27/01 at 09:19 (042627)

Hi Brendan,

John is right, it's no simple 10 minute procedure. I had mine done by a Pod. who had done over 50 of them. It took 30 minutes, and I was in A LOT of pain for the next 3 weeks. It's something you definatly want to check out before you even consider having it done. It's called Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy. Check it out on the http://www . Oh, btw, that was 1.5 years ago and I am no better today than before I had the procedure. Of course everyone is different. Good luck

BG

Re: PF Surgery

Dr. Zuckerman on 3/27/01 at 14:06 (042667)

It is a ten minute operation with the potential for causing a life time of foot and heel pain.

Re: PF Surgery

Pauline on 3/28/01 at 14:36 (042818)

Brandon,
If you really want the facts you need to do the research. You can begin by following the posting on the Surgery site right here. Begin to add up all the folks posting who have had the surgery and are no better off today than before they had it. In fact you will find many of them in worse condition because they now have no natural support for their foot.

Remember once the Plantar Fascia is released (cut) they can't sew it back.
The mistake most people make is that because they want a quick end to the pain and the Dr is offering to rlease the fascia they think great once cut no pain--everything goes back to normal. They forget that the Plantar Fascia provides major support for the arch and the entire foot. Simple physics ' For every action there is a reaction' The foot is a complicated structure because every part is directly related to another. When you work on one, you cause a reaction in another.

If you have tried conservative measures, then try ESWT next. Save the cutting----they can always do it. Even under the best conditions surgery still has various outcomes. The fallacy is that we think ours is going to be different.

You can also go to the Medical Journels and read abstracts about Plantar Fascia release. The trouble it most folks don't want to take the time to research anything---its much easier to walk in to the operating room and hand over your insurance card. It's only afterward they wish they had done their homework. The buy their orthotics and look for a good lawyer.
But the damage is already done. Orthotics can't replace what God has created--- the Plantar Fascia.

In the end, it's your choice. I hope you choose wisely.

Re: PF Surgery

JudyS on 3/28/01 at 15:26 (042827)

Pauline, with lots and lots of due respect, I disagree a bit with the feeling that surgery is only a dangerous alternative.
The rate of successful release surgeries far outweighs the ones that 'don't work'. We hear about failures a lot here because those that have successful outcomes generally don't have a need to post here. Doctors recommend the surgery after pro-longed conventional treatments because their training and experience tell them it's the proper 'next step'. I'm sure they wouldn't recommend or perform it if they didn't believe it had a very good probable outcome. I know when to question my doctor, but I also feel that I know when to trust his/her expertise. I don't mean to sound contradictory - I hope you can forgive me if I do. My husband did, in fact, 'walk to the operating room and hand over his insurance card' because, after a year of pain, he chose to follow his doc's advice and he's happy that he did. I don't think it's a fallacy that we think we're going to be different. I think it's a reasonable assumption based on the rate of recovery of surgery patients.
My favorite pro-athlete story is that of SD Padre's centerfielder Steve Finley. He was just like the rest of us - in serious pain and on his feet all the time! He had the endoscopic release surgery and was back on the field, pain-free, in only a couple months. Clearly we don't have his training, pre and post op, but the surgery was no problem for him and he had it done on the advice of the medical professionals around him.
We all have tried many treatments here, including surgery. And we've discovered, clearly, that what works, or doesn't, for one does the opposite for another. Even ESWT hasn't worked for everyone. I feel that surgery should always be considered seriously as a viable alternative in one's self-education re: PF treatment.

Re: PF Surgery

john h on 3/27/01 at 08:29 (042620)

it is no simple surgery brendan and as you are improving i would not consider surgery for some time. in any event do not let him totally detach the fascia from the heel.

Re: PF Surgery

Brian G on 3/27/01 at 09:19 (042627)

Hi Brendan,

John is right, it's no simple 10 minute procedure. I had mine done by a Pod. who had done over 50 of them. It took 30 minutes, and I was in A LOT of pain for the next 3 weeks. It's something you definatly want to check out before you even consider having it done. It's called Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy. Check it out on the http://www . Oh, btw, that was 1.5 years ago and I am no better today than before I had the procedure. Of course everyone is different. Good luck

BG

Re: PF Surgery

Dr. Zuckerman on 3/27/01 at 14:06 (042667)

It is a ten minute operation with the potential for causing a life time of foot and heel pain.

Re: PF Surgery

Pauline on 3/28/01 at 14:36 (042818)

Brandon,
If you really want the facts you need to do the research. You can begin by following the posting on the Surgery site right here. Begin to add up all the folks posting who have had the surgery and are no better off today than before they had it. In fact you will find many of them in worse condition because they now have no natural support for their foot.

Remember once the Plantar Fascia is released (cut) they can't sew it back.
The mistake most people make is that because they want a quick end to the pain and the Dr is offering to rlease the fascia they think great once cut no pain--everything goes back to normal. They forget that the Plantar Fascia provides major support for the arch and the entire foot. Simple physics ' For every action there is a reaction' The foot is a complicated structure because every part is directly related to another. When you work on one, you cause a reaction in another.

If you have tried conservative measures, then try ESWT next. Save the cutting----they can always do it. Even under the best conditions surgery still has various outcomes. The fallacy is that we think ours is going to be different.

You can also go to the Medical Journels and read abstracts about Plantar Fascia release. The trouble it most folks don't want to take the time to research anything---its much easier to walk in to the operating room and hand over your insurance card. It's only afterward they wish they had done their homework. The buy their orthotics and look for a good lawyer.
But the damage is already done. Orthotics can't replace what God has created--- the Plantar Fascia.

In the end, it's your choice. I hope you choose wisely.

Re: PF Surgery

JudyS on 3/28/01 at 15:26 (042827)

Pauline, with lots and lots of due respect, I disagree a bit with the feeling that surgery is only a dangerous alternative.
The rate of successful release surgeries far outweighs the ones that 'don't work'. We hear about failures a lot here because those that have successful outcomes generally don't have a need to post here. Doctors recommend the surgery after pro-longed conventional treatments because their training and experience tell them it's the proper 'next step'. I'm sure they wouldn't recommend or perform it if they didn't believe it had a very good probable outcome. I know when to question my doctor, but I also feel that I know when to trust his/her expertise. I don't mean to sound contradictory - I hope you can forgive me if I do. My husband did, in fact, 'walk to the operating room and hand over his insurance card' because, after a year of pain, he chose to follow his doc's advice and he's happy that he did. I don't think it's a fallacy that we think we're going to be different. I think it's a reasonable assumption based on the rate of recovery of surgery patients.
My favorite pro-athlete story is that of SD Padre's centerfielder Steve Finley. He was just like the rest of us - in serious pain and on his feet all the time! He had the endoscopic release surgery and was back on the field, pain-free, in only a couple months. Clearly we don't have his training, pre and post op, but the surgery was no problem for him and he had it done on the advice of the medical professionals around him.
We all have tried many treatments here, including surgery. And we've discovered, clearly, that what works, or doesn't, for one does the opposite for another. Even ESWT hasn't worked for everyone. I feel that surgery should always be considered seriously as a viable alternative in one's self-education re: PF treatment.