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TO : Valerie S

Posted by Laurie R on 4/03/01 at 00:36 (043392)

Hi Valerie,
I was just wondering how you were doing?? And did you see your doctor or did you get a new one? I hope things are going better fo ryou. Let us know how you are. I think you said you had to go back to work today ,but I am not sure. My very best to you... Laurie R

Re: TO : Valerie S - Still here at home

Valerie S on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043408)

Hi Laurie!

Thanks for taking the time to check up on me. I went to the doc yesterday, he gave me 3 more weeks off work and more PT. I went directly to the PT to tell him, and he said 'let's go!'... so I was pretty busy all day, with that and the errands I had to run for my husband.

I had called my pod's office on Friday to req my xrays. The receptionist told me to talk to the doc when I came in, so he could decide which xrays to make copies of. whatever. I didn't mention it to him, but did see the pink phone message note in my file, so I wonder if he saw that, knew I was looking for a 2nd opinion, and decided to be more cooperative. Whatever works, right?

So, he let me speak my piece. I was ready for a fight about work, but he said, 'Let's say 3 weeks. We'll see how you are doing after 2 weeks. Do you think your work will go for that?' It's about time! I didn't even have to get mean with him (although I had a few choice feelings picked out to express to him), Hee hee. I changed my language is all. I let him know that I can not do my job right now. (instead of saying, I need time off). He listened to me and treated me with respect, I think because I did the same. I gave him the respect he deserves as a medical professional, but let him know that I know more than the average patient does, and I wasn't going to put up with his guff anymore hee hee.

Another small victory... maybe there is some hope here. I have no idea what my recovery will be like, what my long-term plan is or should be right now. As far as everyone around me is concerned, I am just trying to get better so that I can get back to work. Maybe this won't happen, but I gotta give it a try.

The hardest thing right now is battling the attitude of my coworkers and boss. There is another woman there, who had the PF-otomy; she swears it is the miracle cure for all... the only thing that works. Of course, she still has problems with that foot, and is ready to cut the other one because it is so bad... She has been pressuring me to get the surgery. And I was almost convinced, until I decided to do a little research on my own about it. (That is how I found this place - Praise the Lord! Thank you all for being here, and saving me. I think I would probably be on the verge of surgery right this minute. seriously) So, whenever I call work, and I mean every phone call and every person I talk to, they say 'You're not getting the surgery?' 'Any reason you're not getting the surgery?' ... Please let me get better, so I can go back and stick my toes right up their collective nose! (please just let me get better...)

Who knows what tomorrow will bring. Right now, my mom should be coming over any minute to go out for breakfast and spend the day together. Thanks for all your encouragement and support. I know I have a long way to go, but with you around, the path doesn't look so steep. Maybe there is hope beyond this great fog of pain.

Thanks again, Laurie. Have a great day. I will keep you posted. It sure is nice to know that I am not alone out here.

I go for 2nd opinion on Thursday. It will be interesting to see what the ortho says about my case. Also my pod ordered a night splint for me (paid by insurance at 90%). Weird maybe, but I am kinda excited about this.

Have fun.

Val.

Re: TO : Valerie S - Still here at home

JudyS on 4/03/01 at 12:03 (043438)

Val, it is so alarming to me that the folks at your work want to 'push' you in to surgery! Surgery doesn't usually even get talked about, medically, until after at least 6 to 9 months of conservative treatment. Maybe you could refer ALL of them to this board! And to top it off, you have a co-worker who has PF AND hasn't yet had complete relief from surgery! Sure sounds like a workman's comp case to me. No, the 'knife' is not the answer until all else has been eliminated over a period of time - why should you risk surgical issues when it's so very likely that you'll heal just fine over time. You're experiencing what so many of us here have - a certain 'attitude' from folks who just don't get that you're walking on razor blades every minute of every day. They can't 'see' your pain so they don't think it's a big deal.
P.S. - could we have your Mom too?

Re: TO : Valerie S - Still here at home

Beverly on 4/03/01 at 14:25 (043449)

Valerie,

Like others here, I find it alarming that your co-workers want to push you to surgery. As Judy said, that is something that is almost never even offered until at least a year of failure with other treatments. I am at the one year mark, and although I have not made as much progress as I'd like, I still am not open to surgery. All you have to do is read the surgery horror stories here to want to go slow and easy when considering that option.

Now that EWST is available, I know I will definitely try that long before I even consider surgery.

Mostly, I find it a terrible violation of boundaries and your personal space/life for a co-worker to push you towards surgery. It does not sound like she's doing that great herself.

One good thing, as long as you are off work, you don't have to be around or listen to this woman!

Glad your doctor gave you more time off. Sounds promising.
Beverly

Re: TO : Valerie S - Still here at home

Laurie R on 4/03/01 at 17:14 (043474)

Hi Val,
Thanks for the update. I have a question for you .How long have you been seeing this doctor?? The reason I am asking is ,sometimes with many doctors after you have been seeing them for a while, their whole attitude changes for the better. I believe in giving everyone a chance ... Your Pod sounds like he took you very serious this time. Plus you got 3 more weeks off ,which you deserve .....You sound so much more happier then last week. Stress alone of not knowing if you are going to have the time off will make your pain worse.

Now for the coworkers and your boss , it does not matter what they think or say . They have NO CLUE how you feel or what knid of pain you are in. It is not their bussiness .....You take as much time off as you need to get better .

Hang in there , your on the right road now .

Laurie R

Re: TO : Valerie S - Still here at home

Julie on 4/03/01 at 17:15 (043475)

Val, I agree with Judy and Beverly. Your co-workers have no right to pressure you on matters concerning your health - that goes especially for the one whose own foot surgery hasn't been all that madly successful. I suspect, though, that at the rate you're educating yourself about PF and the wide range of non-surgical, conservative options available to you, the 'battle' will soon die down because they won't be able to continue it in the face of your reasoned, fact- based knowledge. Look what happened with your pod when you began to assert yourself.

You're doing great, and it does all sound promising, so hang in there.

Re: The miracle of surgery

Valerie S on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043482)

Hi Judy.
My coworker had her right foot done (not sure when). She says it's 90% better. She has shared her story with me and been a good source of support when no one else knew what I was going through. I get the feeling that she rushed into surgery (she is knife happy on other body parts too), but she is totally convinced that it is the only thing that works. 'Get it over with...' She has PF bad in her left foot now, and so she puts more weight on her right, making it flare up. She is planning to get her left foot cut in June or July. I really feel bad, taking time off work while I know she is there, not only covering for me, but suffering like I am (was). She makes her decisions and I make mine, it's true... but she can't help talking about her situation and comparing to mine: I think that the people at work just think that I should only be taking time off if I am getting surgery, since (according to her) this (rest & PT) isn't going to help me at all.

It was a major ethical dilemma for me, whether to take time off or not. I feel like I am doing what I need to, but really don't know if I will get better. It's hard not to doubt a decision like this one. I try not to think about it, since I am a dedicated employee and care about my coworkers and the success of our store. I am well-respected, but feel that right now I am probably not very well thought of. She's more dedicated and she's tougher because she keeps on working, and she's smarter... has the real answer. I know the truth. I put the corporation before my own well-being for long enough. ... Why am I even deliberating over this?

I guess because I am kind of living on hope right now. I feel like I am at a standstill, don't know what to do to get better faster. Just saying it, I know I sound silly (better faster). I just feel under-the-gun to see some improvement. I have no patience and I think too much.

I can't just sit and wait... ugh. I have my 2nd opinion on Thursday. I wonder if this new doc will do different tests or have any new ideas for me. I guess now I sit and wait.

Thanks for putting up with my rambling doubts. I appreciate your input.

About the Workman's Comp... I still don't know if I should go for it. I told my pod yesterday that I thought my work was causing this, and he was reluctant to support that statement, telling me that many factors can be involved. (He is also the doctor of my surgery-loving coworker, she referred me. He is not pushing surgery, she is.) I think it might be hard to find a doctor to back up the claim that this is CAUSED by working on my feet.

Thanks and you can meet my mom on your way to Dr.Z's, if you come through Michigan! She's totally up on this PF stuff too!

Take it easy... Val.

Re: Doctor/Patient Relationship

Valerie S on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043486)

Hi Laurie.

I have been seeing this doctor since the beginning of December. He has seen me in a couple of different moods, and has said more than once that he considers my case severe. While I have been thinking him unkind and uncompassionate over the last month or so, I think I might be starting to understand him a little better too. I realize that he needs time to think before he responds sometimes.

I still wonder how much impact that little note about 'the patient has requested copy of xrays' had on the way he listened to me.

I know that I am doing the right thing by resting, but it's still hard when I realize the resentment that must be growing toward me at work.

Thanks for all your help and advice.

Val.

Re: The miracle of surgery

ellen on 4/03/01 at 18:01 (043489)

Hi Val,

I think that that the one thing that has really struck me since I started coming to this board is how individualistic everyone's experience of this condition or set of conditions is.

There are common threads, but the breadth of stories of what people on this board are going through is truly eye-opening and emotionally impacting. What works for one person may not work for another. It seems that we all are struggling to find our way through.

I truly hope things work out for you.

Ellen

Re: The miracle of surgery

Julie on 4/03/01 at 18:02 (043490)

Val, just a comment on your pod's reluctance to back a workman's comp claim on the grounds that 'many factors' are involved. It's true that PF is a multi-factorial disease, and it's also true that not everyone who has a standing job gets PF. But for a person who is prone to PF (and there are several predisposing factors: flat feet, over-pronation and other biomechanical problems etc) the job when thrown into the equation may be the deciding factor.

Perhaps perfectly problem-free feet can take the battering of walking and standing all day on hard surfaces - but you can't be blamed for not having problem-free feet, can you? What you can do, and have started doing, is dealing with the problems. And one of the ways to deal with them, the best way, as most people have found, is rest. Therefore you have an excellent case for staying off work for as long as it takes, and committing yourself to whatever conservative treatments you find helpful. Keep plugging away at the pod: he has come around to some things already, and may eventually agree toback you up on this.

Re: To Val I think that You are brave

Tammie on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043492)

I think you are very brave to stand up for yourself!!!! I applaud you again and again. I am learning allot from you and our friends here and I am also learning that you are right noone else will take care of you but you!!!! I am a slow learner but I am following you and what you say and do, I still have a long way to go and I slipped today when I went to pt I just could not think of what to ask, and when they tell you to do something I feel like a child lol who has been punished But I am very proud that you are doing something for yourself to make people hear you and that you know what you want to do!!! Keep up the good work as I will be following you and trying to copy you, oh oh My mom would be angry at me for being a copy cat. Take care , and I will be waiting to hear from you!

Re: TO : Val: Your work environment/Interesting two of you have PF

Beverly on 4/03/01 at 18:23 (043493)

Valerie,

One thing that strikes me is that there are two of you in your store with debilitating PF. How many people work in your store? Are the floors hard concrete? If you need to make a case down the road for worker's comp, I think the fact that another employee has the same problem could be helpful for your case.
I agree with Laurie. Talk to an attorney. The ones who typically take this kind of case are called 'personal injury attorneys.' The bad side of that coin is that they get a big chunk of your benefit money if they win your case for you. But it is something to consider if needed.

It sounds like your doctor is starting to treat you seriously. That is a good sign.

Take care,
Beverly

Re: Me, Brave?

Valerie S on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043498)

Hi Tammy.

Thanks for your vote of confidence. I am glad if I can be even the least bit helpful to you. You are your own woman, and I know you will soon find the strength and confidence to speak up for yourself too. You need to do whatever is best for YOU. I am flattered that you want to follow me. I hope that I can lead to a solution that will help YOU. We might end up benefitting from totally different things, but I sure can relate to what you are going through. I know that you are struggling right now. I was at a place of total despair and helplessness not too long ago myself. (See the evidence here on this very message board). I will do whatever I can to support you and be your friend. Please feel free to email me as much as you want.

Remember what I told you about the stages of grief? I think this might the same kind of process. Maybe someone here knows what I am talking about. Julie? If we could label the stages that we go through in dealing with PF, we can see that even though the pain might not be going away as quickly as we would like it to, we are still making progress. I wonder if there is already a 'Stages' list that would apply to us.

Anyway, glad to be a friend to you. Let me know what I can do to help.

Your friend, Val.

Re: TO : Val: Your work environment/Interesting two of you have PF

Valerie S on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043502)

I know that the fact that 2 of us have PF is quite a 'coincidence.' Did you know it only takes 3 people to file a class action suit?

I am waiting a little longer before I investigate this avenue. I would feel guilty, like I was screwing the company or something. Especially when the other girl is not saying the same thing. It is in the back (middle) of my mind though.

Thanks again.

Val.

Re: The miracle of surgery

Kay S on 4/03/01 at 20:26 (043511)

To Valerie and Tammi
I am so glad to read your posts and see that both of you seem to be much more in control of your situations than last week. I know you are both still really hurting, but last week you sounded almost hopeless about it, and this week you are taking control and I think it is wonderful that you are helping each other this way.
Yes, it is a slow process, but that doesn't mean you can't get better.
Hang in there, and keep up that positive attitude!
Kay

Re: Stages of learning

Julie on 4/04/01 at 03:28 (043534)

I do know what you are talking about, Val. I went through a lot of stages when I had breast cancer seven years ago. At first there were the usual terror, anger, grief and despair. Then, acknowledgement and acceptance of the realities of my situation. And from there, moving forward into healing. I never felt that I was 'fighting' cancer: I realized quite early on that it was a part of me, and that if I set up a conflict situation with a part of myself, it would be a conflict I could only lose.

I believe profoundly that every experience we are handed in life has a lesson for us, that the most painful ones contain the most important lessons, and that our job is to discover what the lesson is, and learn it so that we can move on. When I was diagnosed, and still at the stage of wondering 'why' this had happened to me, my teacher said something that turned the wholething around for me. Some of you will remember my telling about this some while ago. She said 'It doesn't matter why it happened, all that matters is what you do with this experience, how you use it'. That helped me to trust that I'd be able to go through the trauma I was in for, and I began to look forward to one day being able to use whatever I was going to learn from cancer to help others. And I did learn a lot, and have been able to help others, through my teaching and the book I wrote. Every one of us can do this, in our own way - it all depends on how we look at our experiences. Are they just 'good' or 'bad' and are we going to reject the 'bad' ones, or are we going to meet them in a spirit of inquiry and self-education? It's up to us.

Luckily, my PF has never been serious (largely thanks to this website, which taught me how to deal with it almost immediately, so that it never had a chance to get really bad). I know that long-term, severe, chronic pain must be debilitating, and probably more difficult to deal with in some ways than dealing with cancer. But essentially, PF is not all that different: it too is a learning process, with stages that have to be gone through and lessons to be learned. My 'lesson' from PF has been - patience. And acceptance of it as something I am probably going to have to be aware of, and deal with, through what's left of my life.

I see this board as a shining example of how people use what they have learned to help others. And I think that helping others is a very significant factor in one's own healing, too.

Re: TO : Val: Your work environment/Interesting two of you have PF

Joe P on 4/08/01 at hrmin (043992)

HI, Just noticed that you work on cement floors. I do too and have been for over 30 yrs. I am in alot of pain and have a stress fracture from the plantar fascia. I called up the insurance company regarding workman's comp and she said it's a grey area and I probably can't collect. But I also can't keep working because I can't stand or walk without being in a lot of pain. Anxious to know how you are making out with the workman's comp. Someone told me to get a lawyer too to pursue it.

Re: TO : Valerie S - Still here at home

Valerie S on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043408)

Hi Laurie!

Thanks for taking the time to check up on me. I went to the doc yesterday, he gave me 3 more weeks off work and more PT. I went directly to the PT to tell him, and he said 'let's go!'... so I was pretty busy all day, with that and the errands I had to run for my husband.

I had called my pod's office on Friday to req my xrays. The receptionist told me to talk to the doc when I came in, so he could decide which xrays to make copies of. whatever. I didn't mention it to him, but did see the pink phone message note in my file, so I wonder if he saw that, knew I was looking for a 2nd opinion, and decided to be more cooperative. Whatever works, right?

So, he let me speak my piece. I was ready for a fight about work, but he said, 'Let's say 3 weeks. We'll see how you are doing after 2 weeks. Do you think your work will go for that?' It's about time! I didn't even have to get mean with him (although I had a few choice feelings picked out to express to him), Hee hee. I changed my language is all. I let him know that I can not do my job right now. (instead of saying, I need time off). He listened to me and treated me with respect, I think because I did the same. I gave him the respect he deserves as a medical professional, but let him know that I know more than the average patient does, and I wasn't going to put up with his guff anymore hee hee.

Another small victory... maybe there is some hope here. I have no idea what my recovery will be like, what my long-term plan is or should be right now. As far as everyone around me is concerned, I am just trying to get better so that I can get back to work. Maybe this won't happen, but I gotta give it a try.

The hardest thing right now is battling the attitude of my coworkers and boss. There is another woman there, who had the PF-otomy; she swears it is the miracle cure for all... the only thing that works. Of course, she still has problems with that foot, and is ready to cut the other one because it is so bad... She has been pressuring me to get the surgery. And I was almost convinced, until I decided to do a little research on my own about it. (That is how I found this place - Praise the Lord! Thank you all for being here, and saving me. I think I would probably be on the verge of surgery right this minute. seriously) So, whenever I call work, and I mean every phone call and every person I talk to, they say 'You're not getting the surgery?' 'Any reason you're not getting the surgery?' ... Please let me get better, so I can go back and stick my toes right up their collective nose! (please just let me get better...)

Who knows what tomorrow will bring. Right now, my mom should be coming over any minute to go out for breakfast and spend the day together. Thanks for all your encouragement and support. I know I have a long way to go, but with you around, the path doesn't look so steep. Maybe there is hope beyond this great fog of pain.

Thanks again, Laurie. Have a great day. I will keep you posted. It sure is nice to know that I am not alone out here.

I go for 2nd opinion on Thursday. It will be interesting to see what the ortho says about my case. Also my pod ordered a night splint for me (paid by insurance at 90%). Weird maybe, but I am kinda excited about this.

Have fun.

Val.

Re: TO : Valerie S - Still here at home

JudyS on 4/03/01 at 12:03 (043438)

Val, it is so alarming to me that the folks at your work want to 'push' you in to surgery! Surgery doesn't usually even get talked about, medically, until after at least 6 to 9 months of conservative treatment. Maybe you could refer ALL of them to this board! And to top it off, you have a co-worker who has PF AND hasn't yet had complete relief from surgery! Sure sounds like a workman's comp case to me. No, the 'knife' is not the answer until all else has been eliminated over a period of time - why should you risk surgical issues when it's so very likely that you'll heal just fine over time. You're experiencing what so many of us here have - a certain 'attitude' from folks who just don't get that you're walking on razor blades every minute of every day. They can't 'see' your pain so they don't think it's a big deal.
P.S. - could we have your Mom too?

Re: TO : Valerie S - Still here at home

Beverly on 4/03/01 at 14:25 (043449)

Valerie,

Like others here, I find it alarming that your co-workers want to push you to surgery. As Judy said, that is something that is almost never even offered until at least a year of failure with other treatments. I am at the one year mark, and although I have not made as much progress as I'd like, I still am not open to surgery. All you have to do is read the surgery horror stories here to want to go slow and easy when considering that option.

Now that EWST is available, I know I will definitely try that long before I even consider surgery.

Mostly, I find it a terrible violation of boundaries and your personal space/life for a co-worker to push you towards surgery. It does not sound like she's doing that great herself.

One good thing, as long as you are off work, you don't have to be around or listen to this woman!

Glad your doctor gave you more time off. Sounds promising.
Beverly

Re: TO : Valerie S - Still here at home

Laurie R on 4/03/01 at 17:14 (043474)

Hi Val,
Thanks for the update. I have a question for you .How long have you been seeing this doctor?? The reason I am asking is ,sometimes with many doctors after you have been seeing them for a while, their whole attitude changes for the better. I believe in giving everyone a chance ... Your Pod sounds like he took you very serious this time. Plus you got 3 more weeks off ,which you deserve .....You sound so much more happier then last week. Stress alone of not knowing if you are going to have the time off will make your pain worse.

Now for the coworkers and your boss , it does not matter what they think or say . They have NO CLUE how you feel or what knid of pain you are in. It is not their bussiness .....You take as much time off as you need to get better .

Hang in there , your on the right road now .

Laurie R

Re: TO : Valerie S - Still here at home

Julie on 4/03/01 at 17:15 (043475)

Val, I agree with Judy and Beverly. Your co-workers have no right to pressure you on matters concerning your health - that goes especially for the one whose own foot surgery hasn't been all that madly successful. I suspect, though, that at the rate you're educating yourself about PF and the wide range of non-surgical, conservative options available to you, the 'battle' will soon die down because they won't be able to continue it in the face of your reasoned, fact- based knowledge. Look what happened with your pod when you began to assert yourself.

You're doing great, and it does all sound promising, so hang in there.

Re: The miracle of surgery

Valerie S on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043482)

Hi Judy.
My coworker had her right foot done (not sure when). She says it's 90% better. She has shared her story with me and been a good source of support when no one else knew what I was going through. I get the feeling that she rushed into surgery (she is knife happy on other body parts too), but she is totally convinced that it is the only thing that works. 'Get it over with...' She has PF bad in her left foot now, and so she puts more weight on her right, making it flare up. She is planning to get her left foot cut in June or July. I really feel bad, taking time off work while I know she is there, not only covering for me, but suffering like I am (was). She makes her decisions and I make mine, it's true... but she can't help talking about her situation and comparing to mine: I think that the people at work just think that I should only be taking time off if I am getting surgery, since (according to her) this (rest & PT) isn't going to help me at all.

It was a major ethical dilemma for me, whether to take time off or not. I feel like I am doing what I need to, but really don't know if I will get better. It's hard not to doubt a decision like this one. I try not to think about it, since I am a dedicated employee and care about my coworkers and the success of our store. I am well-respected, but feel that right now I am probably not very well thought of. She's more dedicated and she's tougher because she keeps on working, and she's smarter... has the real answer. I know the truth. I put the corporation before my own well-being for long enough. ... Why am I even deliberating over this?

I guess because I am kind of living on hope right now. I feel like I am at a standstill, don't know what to do to get better faster. Just saying it, I know I sound silly (better faster). I just feel under-the-gun to see some improvement. I have no patience and I think too much.

I can't just sit and wait... ugh. I have my 2nd opinion on Thursday. I wonder if this new doc will do different tests or have any new ideas for me. I guess now I sit and wait.

Thanks for putting up with my rambling doubts. I appreciate your input.

About the Workman's Comp... I still don't know if I should go for it. I told my pod yesterday that I thought my work was causing this, and he was reluctant to support that statement, telling me that many factors can be involved. (He is also the doctor of my surgery-loving coworker, she referred me. He is not pushing surgery, she is.) I think it might be hard to find a doctor to back up the claim that this is CAUSED by working on my feet.

Thanks and you can meet my mom on your way to Dr.Z's, if you come through Michigan! She's totally up on this PF stuff too!

Take it easy... Val.

Re: Doctor/Patient Relationship

Valerie S on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043486)

Hi Laurie.

I have been seeing this doctor since the beginning of December. He has seen me in a couple of different moods, and has said more than once that he considers my case severe. While I have been thinking him unkind and uncompassionate over the last month or so, I think I might be starting to understand him a little better too. I realize that he needs time to think before he responds sometimes.

I still wonder how much impact that little note about 'the patient has requested copy of xrays' had on the way he listened to me.

I know that I am doing the right thing by resting, but it's still hard when I realize the resentment that must be growing toward me at work.

Thanks for all your help and advice.

Val.

Re: The miracle of surgery

ellen on 4/03/01 at 18:01 (043489)

Hi Val,

I think that that the one thing that has really struck me since I started coming to this board is how individualistic everyone's experience of this condition or set of conditions is.

There are common threads, but the breadth of stories of what people on this board are going through is truly eye-opening and emotionally impacting. What works for one person may not work for another. It seems that we all are struggling to find our way through.

I truly hope things work out for you.

Ellen

Re: The miracle of surgery

Julie on 4/03/01 at 18:02 (043490)

Val, just a comment on your pod's reluctance to back a workman's comp claim on the grounds that 'many factors' are involved. It's true that PF is a multi-factorial disease, and it's also true that not everyone who has a standing job gets PF. But for a person who is prone to PF (and there are several predisposing factors: flat feet, over-pronation and other biomechanical problems etc) the job when thrown into the equation may be the deciding factor.

Perhaps perfectly problem-free feet can take the battering of walking and standing all day on hard surfaces - but you can't be blamed for not having problem-free feet, can you? What you can do, and have started doing, is dealing with the problems. And one of the ways to deal with them, the best way, as most people have found, is rest. Therefore you have an excellent case for staying off work for as long as it takes, and committing yourself to whatever conservative treatments you find helpful. Keep plugging away at the pod: he has come around to some things already, and may eventually agree toback you up on this.

Re: To Val I think that You are brave

Tammie on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043492)

I think you are very brave to stand up for yourself!!!! I applaud you again and again. I am learning allot from you and our friends here and I am also learning that you are right noone else will take care of you but you!!!! I am a slow learner but I am following you and what you say and do, I still have a long way to go and I slipped today when I went to pt I just could not think of what to ask, and when they tell you to do something I feel like a child lol who has been punished But I am very proud that you are doing something for yourself to make people hear you and that you know what you want to do!!! Keep up the good work as I will be following you and trying to copy you, oh oh My mom would be angry at me for being a copy cat. Take care , and I will be waiting to hear from you!

Re: TO : Val: Your work environment/Interesting two of you have PF

Beverly on 4/03/01 at 18:23 (043493)

Valerie,

One thing that strikes me is that there are two of you in your store with debilitating PF. How many people work in your store? Are the floors hard concrete? If you need to make a case down the road for worker's comp, I think the fact that another employee has the same problem could be helpful for your case.
I agree with Laurie. Talk to an attorney. The ones who typically take this kind of case are called 'personal injury attorneys.' The bad side of that coin is that they get a big chunk of your benefit money if they win your case for you. But it is something to consider if needed.

It sounds like your doctor is starting to treat you seriously. That is a good sign.

Take care,
Beverly

Re: Me, Brave?

Valerie S on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043498)

Hi Tammy.

Thanks for your vote of confidence. I am glad if I can be even the least bit helpful to you. You are your own woman, and I know you will soon find the strength and confidence to speak up for yourself too. You need to do whatever is best for YOU. I am flattered that you want to follow me. I hope that I can lead to a solution that will help YOU. We might end up benefitting from totally different things, but I sure can relate to what you are going through. I know that you are struggling right now. I was at a place of total despair and helplessness not too long ago myself. (See the evidence here on this very message board). I will do whatever I can to support you and be your friend. Please feel free to email me as much as you want.

Remember what I told you about the stages of grief? I think this might the same kind of process. Maybe someone here knows what I am talking about. Julie? If we could label the stages that we go through in dealing with PF, we can see that even though the pain might not be going away as quickly as we would like it to, we are still making progress. I wonder if there is already a 'Stages' list that would apply to us.

Anyway, glad to be a friend to you. Let me know what I can do to help.

Your friend, Val.

Re: TO : Val: Your work environment/Interesting two of you have PF

Valerie S on 4/03/01 at hrmin (043502)

I know that the fact that 2 of us have PF is quite a 'coincidence.' Did you know it only takes 3 people to file a class action suit?

I am waiting a little longer before I investigate this avenue. I would feel guilty, like I was screwing the company or something. Especially when the other girl is not saying the same thing. It is in the back (middle) of my mind though.

Thanks again.

Val.

Re: The miracle of surgery

Kay S on 4/03/01 at 20:26 (043511)

To Valerie and Tammi
I am so glad to read your posts and see that both of you seem to be much more in control of your situations than last week. I know you are both still really hurting, but last week you sounded almost hopeless about it, and this week you are taking control and I think it is wonderful that you are helping each other this way.
Yes, it is a slow process, but that doesn't mean you can't get better.
Hang in there, and keep up that positive attitude!
Kay

Re: Stages of learning

Julie on 4/04/01 at 03:28 (043534)

I do know what you are talking about, Val. I went through a lot of stages when I had breast cancer seven years ago. At first there were the usual terror, anger, grief and despair. Then, acknowledgement and acceptance of the realities of my situation. And from there, moving forward into healing. I never felt that I was 'fighting' cancer: I realized quite early on that it was a part of me, and that if I set up a conflict situation with a part of myself, it would be a conflict I could only lose.

I believe profoundly that every experience we are handed in life has a lesson for us, that the most painful ones contain the most important lessons, and that our job is to discover what the lesson is, and learn it so that we can move on. When I was diagnosed, and still at the stage of wondering 'why' this had happened to me, my teacher said something that turned the wholething around for me. Some of you will remember my telling about this some while ago. She said 'It doesn't matter why it happened, all that matters is what you do with this experience, how you use it'. That helped me to trust that I'd be able to go through the trauma I was in for, and I began to look forward to one day being able to use whatever I was going to learn from cancer to help others. And I did learn a lot, and have been able to help others, through my teaching and the book I wrote. Every one of us can do this, in our own way - it all depends on how we look at our experiences. Are they just 'good' or 'bad' and are we going to reject the 'bad' ones, or are we going to meet them in a spirit of inquiry and self-education? It's up to us.

Luckily, my PF has never been serious (largely thanks to this website, which taught me how to deal with it almost immediately, so that it never had a chance to get really bad). I know that long-term, severe, chronic pain must be debilitating, and probably more difficult to deal with in some ways than dealing with cancer. But essentially, PF is not all that different: it too is a learning process, with stages that have to be gone through and lessons to be learned. My 'lesson' from PF has been - patience. And acceptance of it as something I am probably going to have to be aware of, and deal with, through what's left of my life.

I see this board as a shining example of how people use what they have learned to help others. And I think that helping others is a very significant factor in one's own healing, too.

Re: TO : Val: Your work environment/Interesting two of you have PF

Joe P on 4/08/01 at hrmin (043992)

HI, Just noticed that you work on cement floors. I do too and have been for over 30 yrs. I am in alot of pain and have a stress fracture from the plantar fascia. I called up the insurance company regarding workman's comp and she said it's a grey area and I probably can't collect. But I also can't keep working because I can't stand or walk without being in a lot of pain. Anxious to know how you are making out with the workman's comp. Someone told me to get a lawyer too to pursue it.