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Tape

Posted by Julie on 5/02/01 at 02:04 (046399)

My recent trip to Crete was the acid test of the improvement in my PF, which is 95% better now after 8 months. I did a great deal of walking every day on hilly, stony ground - real punishment even for perfect feet, and my heel held up well under it. I was also pleased and surprised, at how well my tape held up. I applied it every morning, and it took me a full day of walking and swimming all without losing any of its tension and support.

I know from others' posts that it can be hard to find tape that really works, so I highly recommend this one - if it's available in the States. It is Leuko tape, and it's made by Beiersdorf - it must surely be distributed internationally. It comes in different widths: I use two strips of the 3.5cm to connect the ball of the foot and the heel.

There are lots of new people on the site, and some of you may find taping helpful. Instructions for it can be found in part 2 of the heel pain book, and I'll be happy to help anyone who has any questions.

Re: Tape

john h on 5/02/01 at 10:04 (046414)

Leuko tape may be ordered from:

http://ptcatalog.com/misc.shtml

they also have a product called Lido Gel which looks interesting. It contains Lidocane and can be used with Tens units and ultrasound.

Re: Tape

Julie on 5/02/01 at 10:22 (046417)

John, thanks: I'm glad to know the tape can be obtained in the States.

Re: Tape

Rebecca on 5/02/01 at 12:46 (046423)

Dear Julie,
Do you put the Leuko tape directly on your skin or do you use some sort of base tape? TIA

Re: Tape

Julie on 5/02/01 at 12:57 (046424)

Hi Rebecca

I apply the tape direct to the skin, and have no problems with it. It goes on and comes off easily, I've used it regularly for several months, and it has never irritated my skin. But I know that some people prefer to use an underneath layer.

I know that some people leave tape on for days (particularly when they've used the more complicated, tape-intensive methods) but I like to remove it at night to give the skin a chance to breathe. I take the sticky residue off with lighter fluid.

Have you been having problems with tape?

Julie

Re: Tape

Rebecca on 5/02/01 at 18:09 (046436)

Julie,

I haven't tape myself for pf yet, the PT guy did one time, very elaborately. I've taped my knees, though, using Leuko tape and this white base tape. The PT that showed me how to do it said that you needed the base tape to protect the skin. So I was curious if that was the case for you. I'd like to give taping a try, especially since it seems to help you so much, as nothing else has given me much relief. Except shots and I've decided that I'll have to be crawling before I'll put myself through that again! Anyway, thanks!

Re: Tape

Dr. Zuckerman on 5/02/01 at 18:48 (046437)

I know that doctors and literature stated that stretching is the most important aspect in healing pf. It is my opinion that taping is the key and to do it early very early

Re: Tape

Julie on 5/04/01 at 02:11 (046559)

Rebecca, I'm sure a base tape would be needed on the knees. The skin on the soles of the feet is a lot tougher. As I said, I don't need anything under the tape, but you might - try it both ways and see how you get on.

Remove the tape carefully - peel it off slowly and gently, starting at the ball of the foot.

Re: Tape

Julie on 5/04/01 at 02:25 (046560)

Dr, I absolutely agree. Scott's remark in the PF Book, that rest is the best treatment for an injured plantar fascia, and that taping is a good way of resting the fascia, is engraved on my consciousness. And taping has proved very effective for me.

I've come to think that stretching is universally advised because it's believed that tight calf muscles are the main, even the only, cause of PF. However, we know that PF has many causes: activity, biomechanical faults, sudden injury, being overweight, age. Not all these things stem from tight calf muscles! If the calf muscles are tight, correct stretching may help. If they aren't, stretching can do more harm than good (for example, it can irritate the achilles tendon).

For example: after 30 years of yoga practice my calf muscles are not tight, and stretching them did not help me: in fact, the classic wall stretches I was given made me worse, even though I was doing them correctly. So I stopped doing them. It concerns me when people persist, and are encouraged by their doctors to persist, with stretches which they may not need, which they probably don't do correctly (it's not easy to do them correctly) and which may do more damage.

Re: Stretching - ps

Julie on 5/04/01 at 02:29 (046562)

I don't mean to convey the message that all stretching/exercise is bad! But for most PF sufferers, non-weight-bearing stretching will be better and safer than weight-bearing stretching (i.e. the wall stretches). And strengthening exercises are important, bearing in mind that our muscles lose strength when we have to cut back on activity.

Re: Stretching - ps

Dr. Zuckerman on 5/04/01 at 07:39 (046565)

Stretching should be done is there is an equinus of the calf muscles. This needs to be determine by a range of motion evaluation.

Re: Stretching

Julie on 5/04/01 at 16:22 (046630)

Clarify, please: when you say 'equinus' of the calf muscles do you mean the shortening of the calf muscles that happens when the foot can't adequately dorsiflex (i.e. bend backward at the ankle) and holds itself naturally in a similar position to that of a horse's hoof (i.e. too plantarflexed)?

I think you're saying that stretching is needed when the calf muscles are shortened/tight? When I told my podiatrist that I didn't think stretching was helping me because my calf muscles weren't tight, and the stretches were irritating my achilles tendon, he said I was right: that stretching is needed when the gastroc and soleus are tight, but when they aren't, stretching can do more harm than good. Which I had discovered for myself. The thing is, he had evaluated me when I first saw him, several weeks earlier, but had still prescribed stretching. Perhaps he was on automatic pilot that day...

I wish this whole stretching business could be refined, and advice on whether to stretch or not to stretch given more specifically to each person. And I wish that stretching, if stretching is needed, could be properly taught and monitored. I'm repeating myself. Oh well.

Re: Stretching - ps

Errol H on 5/04/01 at hrmin (046631)

What means this message!? :) I've had PF for 4 years, and for the first 2 and 1/2 years, I think I was overstretching on the advice of my PTs. About a year ago, I really cut back on the stretching, and things got somewhat better within 3 weeks. Now, I'm doing stretching/strenghening with a bicycle innertube before getting out of bed, and slowly resuming some wall stretches, but these seem dicey, and I can feel a 'sting' a few minutes to a few hours after doing the simple ones. I've just received the silicon orthotics from Dr. Kiper, and we'll see their effects. Peace, love, and good health to all. :)

Re: Stretching

Julie on 5/04/01 at 16:43 (046632)

Errol, listen to what your body says to you. If you are still responding badly to the wall stretches it's probably best to forego them. I think a lot of people overdo stretching, to their disadvantage. The problem is, everyone wants to 'do' things to get better, but often, too much doing is too much.

If you are going to carry on with the wall stretches, be sure that you are facing straight on to the wall, with your hips parallel to it. Make sure also that your feet are parallel and at right angles to the wall. And keep your pelvis centred and your tailbone tucked under, so that your lower back stays lengthened: you don't want to add lower back problems to your foot problems.

You aren't doing the the stair stretch, are you? The one where you stand on the balls of your feet on a stair and drop your heels over the edge? That's a beast: impossible to control, and almost certain to overstretch and do damage.

Good luck with your new orthotics.

Re: Stretching

Errol H on 5/05/01 at 19:30 (046720)

Julie-I WAS doing the stairstep thing for the first 2 and 1/2 years on the advice of my PTs! Of course, I wanted to 'do something' to get better, since I had been a regular exerciser before the PF. I'll take your advice and go easy on the wall stretches. The silicon orthotics are interesting. It's too early to say how effective they'll be, but they seem promising, by spreading out the forces pretty well. Anyone else have experience with the silicon orthotics?

Re: Stretching - Dr Z, clarify 'equinus' please

Julie on 5/06/01 at 02:30 (046747)

Hi Dr Z

For the benefit of Errol and others, could you please answer my question and clarify what you mean by 'equinus of the calf muscles' - if my understanding (see my post above) is right, just say 'yes', otherwise please correct me.

Thanks a lot!

Re: Yes. The hurse hoof position is equinus

DR. Zuckerman on 5/06/01 at 06:31 (046752)

yes

Re: Tape

john h on 5/02/01 at 10:04 (046414)

Leuko tape may be ordered from:

http://ptcatalog.com/misc.shtml

they also have a product called Lido Gel which looks interesting. It contains Lidocane and can be used with Tens units and ultrasound.

Re: Tape

Julie on 5/02/01 at 10:22 (046417)

John, thanks: I'm glad to know the tape can be obtained in the States.

Re: Tape

Rebecca on 5/02/01 at 12:46 (046423)

Dear Julie,
Do you put the Leuko tape directly on your skin or do you use some sort of base tape? TIA

Re: Tape

Julie on 5/02/01 at 12:57 (046424)

Hi Rebecca

I apply the tape direct to the skin, and have no problems with it. It goes on and comes off easily, I've used it regularly for several months, and it has never irritated my skin. But I know that some people prefer to use an underneath layer.

I know that some people leave tape on for days (particularly when they've used the more complicated, tape-intensive methods) but I like to remove it at night to give the skin a chance to breathe. I take the sticky residue off with lighter fluid.

Have you been having problems with tape?

Julie

Re: Tape

Rebecca on 5/02/01 at 18:09 (046436)

Julie,

I haven't tape myself for pf yet, the PT guy did one time, very elaborately. I've taped my knees, though, using Leuko tape and this white base tape. The PT that showed me how to do it said that you needed the base tape to protect the skin. So I was curious if that was the case for you. I'd like to give taping a try, especially since it seems to help you so much, as nothing else has given me much relief. Except shots and I've decided that I'll have to be crawling before I'll put myself through that again! Anyway, thanks!

Re: Tape

Dr. Zuckerman on 5/02/01 at 18:48 (046437)

I know that doctors and literature stated that stretching is the most important aspect in healing pf. It is my opinion that taping is the key and to do it early very early

Re: Tape

Julie on 5/04/01 at 02:11 (046559)

Rebecca, I'm sure a base tape would be needed on the knees. The skin on the soles of the feet is a lot tougher. As I said, I don't need anything under the tape, but you might - try it both ways and see how you get on.

Remove the tape carefully - peel it off slowly and gently, starting at the ball of the foot.

Re: Tape

Julie on 5/04/01 at 02:25 (046560)

Dr, I absolutely agree. Scott's remark in the PF Book, that rest is the best treatment for an injured plantar fascia, and that taping is a good way of resting the fascia, is engraved on my consciousness. And taping has proved very effective for me.

I've come to think that stretching is universally advised because it's believed that tight calf muscles are the main, even the only, cause of PF. However, we know that PF has many causes: activity, biomechanical faults, sudden injury, being overweight, age. Not all these things stem from tight calf muscles! If the calf muscles are tight, correct stretching may help. If they aren't, stretching can do more harm than good (for example, it can irritate the achilles tendon).

For example: after 30 years of yoga practice my calf muscles are not tight, and stretching them did not help me: in fact, the classic wall stretches I was given made me worse, even though I was doing them correctly. So I stopped doing them. It concerns me when people persist, and are encouraged by their doctors to persist, with stretches which they may not need, which they probably don't do correctly (it's not easy to do them correctly) and which may do more damage.

Re: Stretching - ps

Julie on 5/04/01 at 02:29 (046562)

I don't mean to convey the message that all stretching/exercise is bad! But for most PF sufferers, non-weight-bearing stretching will be better and safer than weight-bearing stretching (i.e. the wall stretches). And strengthening exercises are important, bearing in mind that our muscles lose strength when we have to cut back on activity.

Re: Stretching - ps

Dr. Zuckerman on 5/04/01 at 07:39 (046565)

Stretching should be done is there is an equinus of the calf muscles. This needs to be determine by a range of motion evaluation.

Re: Stretching

Julie on 5/04/01 at 16:22 (046630)

Clarify, please: when you say 'equinus' of the calf muscles do you mean the shortening of the calf muscles that happens when the foot can't adequately dorsiflex (i.e. bend backward at the ankle) and holds itself naturally in a similar position to that of a horse's hoof (i.e. too plantarflexed)?

I think you're saying that stretching is needed when the calf muscles are shortened/tight? When I told my podiatrist that I didn't think stretching was helping me because my calf muscles weren't tight, and the stretches were irritating my achilles tendon, he said I was right: that stretching is needed when the gastroc and soleus are tight, but when they aren't, stretching can do more harm than good. Which I had discovered for myself. The thing is, he had evaluated me when I first saw him, several weeks earlier, but had still prescribed stretching. Perhaps he was on automatic pilot that day...

I wish this whole stretching business could be refined, and advice on whether to stretch or not to stretch given more specifically to each person. And I wish that stretching, if stretching is needed, could be properly taught and monitored. I'm repeating myself. Oh well.

Re: Stretching - ps

Errol H on 5/04/01 at hrmin (046631)

What means this message!? :) I've had PF for 4 years, and for the first 2 and 1/2 years, I think I was overstretching on the advice of my PTs. About a year ago, I really cut back on the stretching, and things got somewhat better within 3 weeks. Now, I'm doing stretching/strenghening with a bicycle innertube before getting out of bed, and slowly resuming some wall stretches, but these seem dicey, and I can feel a 'sting' a few minutes to a few hours after doing the simple ones. I've just received the silicon orthotics from Dr. Kiper, and we'll see their effects. Peace, love, and good health to all. :)

Re: Stretching

Julie on 5/04/01 at 16:43 (046632)

Errol, listen to what your body says to you. If you are still responding badly to the wall stretches it's probably best to forego them. I think a lot of people overdo stretching, to their disadvantage. The problem is, everyone wants to 'do' things to get better, but often, too much doing is too much.

If you are going to carry on with the wall stretches, be sure that you are facing straight on to the wall, with your hips parallel to it. Make sure also that your feet are parallel and at right angles to the wall. And keep your pelvis centred and your tailbone tucked under, so that your lower back stays lengthened: you don't want to add lower back problems to your foot problems.

You aren't doing the the stair stretch, are you? The one where you stand on the balls of your feet on a stair and drop your heels over the edge? That's a beast: impossible to control, and almost certain to overstretch and do damage.

Good luck with your new orthotics.

Re: Stretching

Errol H on 5/05/01 at 19:30 (046720)

Julie-I WAS doing the stairstep thing for the first 2 and 1/2 years on the advice of my PTs! Of course, I wanted to 'do something' to get better, since I had been a regular exerciser before the PF. I'll take your advice and go easy on the wall stretches. The silicon orthotics are interesting. It's too early to say how effective they'll be, but they seem promising, by spreading out the forces pretty well. Anyone else have experience with the silicon orthotics?

Re: Stretching - Dr Z, clarify 'equinus' please

Julie on 5/06/01 at 02:30 (046747)

Hi Dr Z

For the benefit of Errol and others, could you please answer my question and clarify what you mean by 'equinus of the calf muscles' - if my understanding (see my post above) is right, just say 'yes', otherwise please correct me.

Thanks a lot!

Re: Yes. The hurse hoof position is equinus

DR. Zuckerman on 5/06/01 at 06:31 (046752)

yes