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Cortisone Injection

Posted by Barbara on 5/09/01 at hrmin (047133)

Had a Coritsone injection in October of 2000 and within days I was back to normal without any pain or even memory of the pain. About mid-March my pain returned and had a second injection in May. Its been 2 days now and I can't walk unlike the first time....I'm now using 2 golf putters as walking sticks .... I'm contacting the doctor today for a follow up visit but if anyone has any ideas on what I can do to relieve this paid, I would be forever greatful....Barb

Re: Cortisone Injection

Jason M on 5/09/01 at hrmin (047149)

Barb, I doubt that the cortisone injections alone will be enough to permanently solve your pain (although I could be wrong). You probably need to try some of the suggestions from this website such as rest, ice, stretching, medicine, taping, or shoe inserts/orthotics. Try reading Scott's article on Plantar Fasciitis, Heel Spurs, and Heel Pain at this website if you haven't already. Hope this helps.

Re: Cortisone Injection

john h on 5/09/01 at 11:02 (047163)

actually, i have read various post that some people were actually cured with only one shot of cortisone. i presume the persons had a mild case of PF and not for very long. the injection allowed for reduced inflamination and just enough time for the person to move on. of course, the person may have been cured by just resting for a couple of weeks. just do not know.

Re: Cortisone Injection

Julie on 5/09/01 at 11:53 (047175)

John, do you think the people that have posted 'cured' with one cortisone injection are really cured, rather than just given relief for an unspecified period of time? I've often thought, sadly, when people post about the complete relief they've had from a shot two weeks or months ago, and feel cured, that they'll probably be back at some point wondering if they should have another shot. I think you're probably right that in cases where the condition really does go away for good, that it was mild to begin with and probably would have gone anyway. But maybe I'm just overly suspicious of shots.

Re: Cortisone Injection

Dr. Zuckerman on 5/09/01 at 12:42 (047186)

When you catch the problem in the acute phase or if it is a bursitis at the insertion at the plantar aspect of the heel can be a cure.

I have many patients that I have given one shot for pain at the insertion and are still pain free ten years or more.

Re: Cortisone Injection

Donna M. on 5/09/01 at 17:36 (047219)

Barbara, I had cortisone injections like you. After my second one I have been worse than before I got them! I wish I had never gotten any injections if I had known it would make it worse! Wish I could be one of the lucky ones that the cortisone would have worked on!
Good luck in getting some relief! Just let us know what you do if you do get relief!!

Re: Cortisone Injection

john h on 5/09/01 at 17:52 (047227)

julie: just no way to know but since over 5.5 million of the 6 million cases reported each year are apparently cured who knows why? i would like to know why i am one of the 10% that was not cured?

Re: Cortisone Injection

john h on 5/09/01 at 17:54 (047228)

donna: can you be sure you would not have got worse even without taking the shot? that is a problem we all have. when we get better is because of time or one of the many things we are doing to try and cure our problem.

Re: Cortisone Injection

Julie on 5/10/01 at 02:40 (047292)

But John, are they 'cured'? I wonder. What constitutes cure? Relief after a cortisone shot or two? As we know, the condition is likely to recur, in many if not most cases. And who are the judges of cure? The less-than-wonderful podiatrists whose patients don't come back because they are tired of not being listened to? Are those patients 'cured' ?

I just don't believe in the 90% cure rate.

I don't consider myself 'cured', although I probably have the right to, as I am now pain free most of the time, and as, even after severe pounding, as in stony hilly Crete the other day, I don't go above level 1. I know I'm going to have to take my dodgy heel into account for the rest of my life.

You've been considerably helped by all the things you've done, including ESWT, and I think I recall reading while ago that you are mostly at level 1-2 these days after years of being much worse - so you too could probably consider yourself cured if you wanted to.

Re: Cortisone Injection

john h on 5/10/01 at 11:08 (047338)

i think scott said one time he would be cured if he could run. that is my same feeling as i ran 30 miles a week for 30 years and now i just watch my friends run by my home every day. i have been tempted to run aound the track a lap or two to see what would happen but then i remember my really bad days. i know of a number of professional basketball players who suffered from PF and got back to playing regularly in the NBA. surely those guys must be almost cured to use their feet though a 60 game NBA season. i find it amazing that no one still really 'knows' for sure the cause or definitive cure for PF. it may in fact be many diseases with many causes and many cures.

Re: Cortisone Injection

Julie on 5/11/01 at 01:40 (047411)

John, I think PF is what happens when there is a weakness at the insertion point, for whatever reason: biomechanical faults, age, excess weight, too much impact exercise whatever. Once that weakness shows up, it is there and will always be there and will always have to be acknowledged and dealt with. If I considered myself cured of PF, threw away my orthotics and started wearing poor unsupportive shoes, I expect my PF would recur. However, I mean to go on taking avoiding action, and fully expect to remain painfree or relatively painfree - but I don't consider that to be cured. Perhaps it's a question of definition, but my definition of 'cured' is when something goes away completely, never to return. I don't think PF will do that if we aren't vigilant, and acknowledge that it is ongoing, even if we are painfree.

Anyway - here I might get into difficulties, but I feel I can say this to you because I know we are exactly the same age - don't you think that we also need to accept that we are growing older, and gracefully let go of some of the things we used to be able to do in our youth? Hard though it is!

I expect all those basketball players know how to tape their feet, and have a high pain threshhold, and are willing to trade possible life-long foot problems for the fun, glory, and big money of playing now.

Re: Cortisone Injection

john h on 5/11/01 at 10:10 (047450)

of course your post is correct julie. i am not very successful at letting things go that i once could do but no longer can. the problem seems to be my brain has not aged at the same pace as my body. my life always revolved around vigorous physical activity. i was still breaking my nose and fingers playing basketball when i was 56. not very smart but i sure enjoyed my noon day games at the YMCA. when my PF first appeared i had never heard of it. just some pain in the feet that i assumed would go away and i would run though the pain. if i had read this board at the time i think i could have taken the necessary action to greatly reduce my 7 years of pain. growing old is not for 'sissys'!

Re: Cortisone Injection

Julie on 5/11/01 at 11:17 (047464)

Too right, John - as they say here. Not for sissies. It is hard. My husband is 78 now, and feeling it.

But I'm really glad you aren't breaking your nose any more - it's a nice nose!

Re: Cortisone Injection

Jason M on 5/09/01 at hrmin (047149)

Barb, I doubt that the cortisone injections alone will be enough to permanently solve your pain (although I could be wrong). You probably need to try some of the suggestions from this website such as rest, ice, stretching, medicine, taping, or shoe inserts/orthotics. Try reading Scott's article on Plantar Fasciitis, Heel Spurs, and Heel Pain at this website if you haven't already. Hope this helps.

Re: Cortisone Injection

john h on 5/09/01 at 11:02 (047163)

actually, i have read various post that some people were actually cured with only one shot of cortisone. i presume the persons had a mild case of PF and not for very long. the injection allowed for reduced inflamination and just enough time for the person to move on. of course, the person may have been cured by just resting for a couple of weeks. just do not know.

Re: Cortisone Injection

Julie on 5/09/01 at 11:53 (047175)

John, do you think the people that have posted 'cured' with one cortisone injection are really cured, rather than just given relief for an unspecified period of time? I've often thought, sadly, when people post about the complete relief they've had from a shot two weeks or months ago, and feel cured, that they'll probably be back at some point wondering if they should have another shot. I think you're probably right that in cases where the condition really does go away for good, that it was mild to begin with and probably would have gone anyway. But maybe I'm just overly suspicious of shots.

Re: Cortisone Injection

Dr. Zuckerman on 5/09/01 at 12:42 (047186)

When you catch the problem in the acute phase or if it is a bursitis at the insertion at the plantar aspect of the heel can be a cure.

I have many patients that I have given one shot for pain at the insertion and are still pain free ten years or more.

Re: Cortisone Injection

Donna M. on 5/09/01 at 17:36 (047219)

Barbara, I had cortisone injections like you. After my second one I have been worse than before I got them! I wish I had never gotten any injections if I had known it would make it worse! Wish I could be one of the lucky ones that the cortisone would have worked on!
Good luck in getting some relief! Just let us know what you do if you do get relief!!

Re: Cortisone Injection

john h on 5/09/01 at 17:52 (047227)

julie: just no way to know but since over 5.5 million of the 6 million cases reported each year are apparently cured who knows why? i would like to know why i am one of the 10% that was not cured?

Re: Cortisone Injection

john h on 5/09/01 at 17:54 (047228)

donna: can you be sure you would not have got worse even without taking the shot? that is a problem we all have. when we get better is because of time or one of the many things we are doing to try and cure our problem.

Re: Cortisone Injection

Julie on 5/10/01 at 02:40 (047292)

But John, are they 'cured'? I wonder. What constitutes cure? Relief after a cortisone shot or two? As we know, the condition is likely to recur, in many if not most cases. And who are the judges of cure? The less-than-wonderful podiatrists whose patients don't come back because they are tired of not being listened to? Are those patients 'cured' ?

I just don't believe in the 90% cure rate.

I don't consider myself 'cured', although I probably have the right to, as I am now pain free most of the time, and as, even after severe pounding, as in stony hilly Crete the other day, I don't go above level 1. I know I'm going to have to take my dodgy heel into account for the rest of my life.

You've been considerably helped by all the things you've done, including ESWT, and I think I recall reading while ago that you are mostly at level 1-2 these days after years of being much worse - so you too could probably consider yourself cured if you wanted to.

Re: Cortisone Injection

john h on 5/10/01 at 11:08 (047338)

i think scott said one time he would be cured if he could run. that is my same feeling as i ran 30 miles a week for 30 years and now i just watch my friends run by my home every day. i have been tempted to run aound the track a lap or two to see what would happen but then i remember my really bad days. i know of a number of professional basketball players who suffered from PF and got back to playing regularly in the NBA. surely those guys must be almost cured to use their feet though a 60 game NBA season. i find it amazing that no one still really 'knows' for sure the cause or definitive cure for PF. it may in fact be many diseases with many causes and many cures.

Re: Cortisone Injection

Julie on 5/11/01 at 01:40 (047411)

John, I think PF is what happens when there is a weakness at the insertion point, for whatever reason: biomechanical faults, age, excess weight, too much impact exercise whatever. Once that weakness shows up, it is there and will always be there and will always have to be acknowledged and dealt with. If I considered myself cured of PF, threw away my orthotics and started wearing poor unsupportive shoes, I expect my PF would recur. However, I mean to go on taking avoiding action, and fully expect to remain painfree or relatively painfree - but I don't consider that to be cured. Perhaps it's a question of definition, but my definition of 'cured' is when something goes away completely, never to return. I don't think PF will do that if we aren't vigilant, and acknowledge that it is ongoing, even if we are painfree.

Anyway - here I might get into difficulties, but I feel I can say this to you because I know we are exactly the same age - don't you think that we also need to accept that we are growing older, and gracefully let go of some of the things we used to be able to do in our youth? Hard though it is!

I expect all those basketball players know how to tape their feet, and have a high pain threshhold, and are willing to trade possible life-long foot problems for the fun, glory, and big money of playing now.

Re: Cortisone Injection

john h on 5/11/01 at 10:10 (047450)

of course your post is correct julie. i am not very successful at letting things go that i once could do but no longer can. the problem seems to be my brain has not aged at the same pace as my body. my life always revolved around vigorous physical activity. i was still breaking my nose and fingers playing basketball when i was 56. not very smart but i sure enjoyed my noon day games at the YMCA. when my PF first appeared i had never heard of it. just some pain in the feet that i assumed would go away and i would run though the pain. if i had read this board at the time i think i could have taken the necessary action to greatly reduce my 7 years of pain. growing old is not for 'sissys'!

Re: Cortisone Injection

Julie on 5/11/01 at 11:17 (047464)

Too right, John - as they say here. Not for sissies. It is hard. My husband is 78 now, and feeling it.

But I'm really glad you aren't breaking your nose any more - it's a nice nose!