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Seeing a neurologist for TTS diagnosis -what to expect?

Posted by Helene M on 5/11/01 at hrmin (047451)

I have an appointment with a neurologist in a few weeks, since I had positive results from my NCS, which was done by a physiatrist. It's been recommended on this board to see a neurologist when you have positive results & a TTS diagnosis. I've never been to one and don't know what my expectations should be. Can anyone with a TTS diagnosis who has seen a neurologist tell me what to expect? Donna SL, as I recall, you went to one recently and he prescribed Vioxx. What else did he do or say? Thanks to all in advance for any comments or advice on this.

Re: Seeing a neurologist for TTS diagnosis -what to expect?

Donna SL on 5/11/01 at 13:39 (047495)

Hi Helene,

The neurologist spent a lot of time with me, probably over an hour. But, almost 3/4 of the visit was asking questions,and taking a history of when, and how all my symptoms started, and looking over all my medical records. I brought him all my recent blood test results, bone scan, MRI, NCV test, and x-ray reports. He then did a quick exam like having me walk, testing certain reflexes, had me do a couple things with my feet and hands, a couple of pin prick and, tuning fork tests on the feet, and ankle area, etc. He then concluded that I did not have any systemic, or neurological disease, or polyneuropathy that was causing the nerve entrapment, and it was probably all due to injury, and trauma from orthotics, etc. I'm not sure how thorough the physical exam was, and may get a second opinion in the near future, but maybe history, and asking questions is the most important thing.

He than ordered some additional blood work for B-12, thyroid, ANA,and some other test I can't remember.

He was shocked that no one had prescribed a decent prescription strength anti-inflammatory all this time like Vioxx, which he thought was critical for reducing inflamation. (It's working). He didn't want me taking anything like neurontin in addition. He also recommended cortizone shots, which my pod, and chiro are against. My pod is not even convinced I really even have TTS.

Make sure when you go to your appointment, you bring as much info as you can. Basically you want to go to a neurologist to rule out any underlying diseases that could be causing your symptoms. He also suggested going to good orthopedist foot and ankle specialist for an additional opinion.

Please Let me know what happened after your appointment.

Donna

Re: Seeing a neurologist for TTS diagnosis -what to expect?

Helene M on 5/11/01 at 14:01 (047498)

Thanks Donna. I'll let you know.

Re: Seeing a neurologist for TTS diagnosis -what to expect?

Pauline on 5/11/01 at 16:59 (047517)

Hi Donna,
I think you will find most Neurologist exactly as Donna described.
They are usually excellent diagnosticians. Your right about the history part they do a good job at that. One told me it wasn't what I had he was interested in it was what I didn't have. He ruled out things based on
tests I didn't respond to where a response would have been expected.

They are fact finders, good in their field then set you off to find the doctors that can actually fix the problem.
Best of luck.

Re: Seeing a neurologist for TTS diagnosis -what to expect?

Donna SL on 5/11/01 at 13:39 (047495)

Hi Helene,

The neurologist spent a lot of time with me, probably over an hour. But, almost 3/4 of the visit was asking questions,and taking a history of when, and how all my symptoms started, and looking over all my medical records. I brought him all my recent blood test results, bone scan, MRI, NCV test, and x-ray reports. He then did a quick exam like having me walk, testing certain reflexes, had me do a couple things with my feet and hands, a couple of pin prick and, tuning fork tests on the feet, and ankle area, etc. He then concluded that I did not have any systemic, or neurological disease, or polyneuropathy that was causing the nerve entrapment, and it was probably all due to injury, and trauma from orthotics, etc. I'm not sure how thorough the physical exam was, and may get a second opinion in the near future, but maybe history, and asking questions is the most important thing.

He than ordered some additional blood work for B-12, thyroid, ANA,and some other test I can't remember.

He was shocked that no one had prescribed a decent prescription strength anti-inflammatory all this time like Vioxx, which he thought was critical for reducing inflamation. (It's working). He didn't want me taking anything like neurontin in addition. He also recommended cortizone shots, which my pod, and chiro are against. My pod is not even convinced I really even have TTS.

Make sure when you go to your appointment, you bring as much info as you can. Basically you want to go to a neurologist to rule out any underlying diseases that could be causing your symptoms. He also suggested going to good orthopedist foot and ankle specialist for an additional opinion.

Please Let me know what happened after your appointment.

Donna

Re: Seeing a neurologist for TTS diagnosis -what to expect?

Helene M on 5/11/01 at 14:01 (047498)

Thanks Donna. I'll let you know.

Re: Seeing a neurologist for TTS diagnosis -what to expect?

Pauline on 5/11/01 at 16:59 (047517)

Hi Donna,
I think you will find most Neurologist exactly as Donna described.
They are usually excellent diagnosticians. Your right about the history part they do a good job at that. One told me it wasn't what I had he was interested in it was what I didn't have. He ruled out things based on
tests I didn't respond to where a response would have been expected.

They are fact finders, good in their field then set you off to find the doctors that can actually fix the problem.
Best of luck.