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isokinetic nonisokinetic

Posted by joshs on 5/19/01 at hrmin (048251)

Is anyone familiar with the terms isokinetic and nonisokinetic relating to exercise? I found them on a page (www.uoregon.edu/~dmandevi/previnj.html) that cites a study (Feltner, et. al, 1994) using isokinetic and nonisokinetic exercise for ankle invertors and evertors to prevent hyperpronation of foot. Apparently while the nonisokinetic exercise proved of no benefit, the isokinetic exercises carried out for eight weeks were comparable in effect to orthotic devices when measureing rearfoot pronation/supination.
Any PT's out there?

Re: isokinetic nonisokinetic

Pauline on 5/19/01 at 07:39 (048258)

Josh,
Can't bring up the page you are refering to. Can you check source again.
This sound like an interesting reference site and I'd like to read it.

Re: isokinetic nonisokinetic

joshs on 5/19/01 at hrmin (048297)

The correct address is. is:www.uoregon.edu/~dmandevinj.html. Another page I just found (www.americanrunning.org/webarticles/injuries_sportsmedicine/misc_sportmed/orthotics.htm) gives a synopsis of the journal article quoted in above link and goes on to explain.

I'm still not completely clear on isokinetic-this second page claims it is when an excercise is carried out with constant speed and resistance, apparently PT's have special equipment to accomplish this and use regularly for rehab. However, the article then goes on to describe foot and ankle exercises one can do at home with a little ingenuity or rubber bands or a PFT that apparently substitute for the isokinetic machines used in study.

If there are any rehab specialists out there who could peruse these links and give an opinion...

Re: isokinetic nonisokinetic

Pauline on 5/19/01 at 07:39 (048258)

Josh,
Can't bring up the page you are refering to. Can you check source again.
This sound like an interesting reference site and I'd like to read it.

Re: isokinetic nonisokinetic

joshs on 5/19/01 at hrmin (048297)

The correct address is. is:www.uoregon.edu/~dmandevinj.html. Another page I just found (www.americanrunning.org/webarticles/injuries_sportsmedicine/misc_sportmed/orthotics.htm) gives a synopsis of the journal article quoted in above link and goes on to explain.

I'm still not completely clear on isokinetic-this second page claims it is when an excercise is carried out with constant speed and resistance, apparently PT's have special equipment to accomplish this and use regularly for rehab. However, the article then goes on to describe foot and ankle exercises one can do at home with a little ingenuity or rubber bands or a PFT that apparently substitute for the isokinetic machines used in study.

If there are any rehab specialists out there who could peruse these links and give an opinion...