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Foot Pain

Posted by Joan S on 5/29/01 at 22:47 (049291)

My heels to not hurt, but my arches do. In the mornings I have trouble probems with walking, also very painful if I rest my feet for any length of time. Recently I found a large lump on the medial arch of my left foot. It is very obvious when I stretch my foot upward. It is very tender to the touch. Any ideas and who should I see. Thanks

Re: Foot Pain

Steve P on 5/30/01 at 16:47 (049378)

Hi Joan --- Read the 'PF Book' on this website & see a specialist right away. I recommend Sports Medicine (1st choice) or Orthopedic (2nd).

Best...........Steve

Re: Foot Pain

Jen S on 5/30/01 at 20:58 (049410)

I seem to experience a greater amount of tenderness not only upon my first step in the morning, but just after a workout mid day. These activties are at opposite ends of the spectum in terms of impact on the facia...and neither of which I am willing to sacrifice, pain or no pain. Any reason why I would experience pain after doing nothing, and also pain after significant activity? One would think it would be either or, not both.
ALso, I can often see bruising on the bottom of my foot, almost like I have stepped on a big, sharp rock. Does this indicate that the injury is more severe?
Thanks!!

Re: Foot Pain

Julie on 5/31/01 at 03:10 (049436)

Hi Joan

I'm sorry about the pain you're in, but I guess you may have to reframe your attitude to it. The 'pain or no pain' mind set is what has landed many people with chronic plantar fasciitis. They were determined to run through the pain, or walk through the pain, or work out through the pain, and a condition that could have been cleared up relatively quickly (i.e. in months) turned into a debilitating, possibly life-long affliction.

I don't know whether PF is what you have, and you don't either, so there is no point in speculating. But I do know that with that level of pain, and the unexplained bruising, you need to see a foot specialist, fast.

And in the meantime, sacrifice the workout. That may seem quite unthinkable to you now, but believe me, backing of f it for however long it takes you to heal is a far better option than pressing on with it and ending up disabled.

Read the heel pain book. Ask questions here when you know what questions you need to ask. And see a foot doctor.

All the best, Julie

Re: Foot Pain - to Joan and Jen

Julie on 5/31/01 at 03:12 (049437)

I see that I've mixed up your two posts: I read 'Joan' for 'Jen'. I hope the post still makes sense to both of you.

Re: Foot Pain

Dr. Chris R on 6/02/01 at hrmin (049660)

Sounds like plantar fasciitis. The pain does not necessarily have to be on the heel. For all the blurb written on plantar fasciitis,not to mention the myriad of treatment modalities, in my experience over 30 years as a doctor, nothing works. Nothing that is until I started using a complementary product called Jade 168 Balm about 5 years ago. Using twice daily application, I have had some extraordinary results in quite a large number of patients - even a prominent neurosurgeon who then wouldn't prescribe it for his own patients because it was 'natural'. Most of my patients have had complete cures, sometimes in a few days, after putting up with the problem for twelve years or more. Sometimes it takes a month, but it usually works quite quickly if you persist. Let me know if you want more information. It's pretty cheap for what it does.
Dr. Chris

Re: Foot Pain - to Joan and Jen

jen on 6/02/01 at 18:53 (049701)

You can imagine my frustration and heart break when the doctor I visited last week regarding my heel pain looked at me like I was a big baby. I was prescribed ASA and told to go home.
I am grateful for this website and some clarification on this condition. Thanks for your advice and help.

Re: Foot Pain - to Joan and Jen

Julie on 6/03/01 at 02:57 (049727)

Jen (got it right this time) - what sort of doctor was it? If it was a general practitioner, he can (almost) be forgiven for not knowing anything about heel pain. If it was, go find a podiatrist. If it was a podiatrist, go find another podiatrist. You need a full biomechanical evaluation and diagnosis so that you can get a treatment strategy in place.

Yes, it's frustrating, but carry on until you find a doctor who is knowledgeable, patient, and willing to work with you so that you can recover. Meanwhile, educate yourself with the heel pain book and the message boards. Don't give up, and don't break your heart over this setback.

Re: Dr --- When you say "nothing works" are you including ESWT? eom

Steve P on 6/03/01 at 09:23 (049741)

.

Re: Is PF really a mechanical problem? I doubt it.

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 6/04/01 at hrmin (049828)

The reason I say 'nothing works' is that I believe the etiological approach to the management of PF is fundamentally flawed.
Because the Jade 168 Balm that I mentioned a few days ago is quite potent as an anti-inflammatory, hemostat and wound healer, it must have to my way of thinking, immunomodulatory properties. In other words, it tends (though not always) to 'normalise' damaged tissue. In PF it has worked in varying degrees for a number of patients, sometimes dramatically within a day or two of application, but more often over several weeks. This rapid response to a chronic (years long) condition therefore made me ponder deeply the whole clinical model of PF.
I believe the mechanical 'over-stretching','overweight', 'calcaneal spur' etc. theory about the causation of PF is seriously flawed, simplistic and probably entirely wrong. There are too many variables that remain unexplained. For instance, why do people suffer severe pain when spurs are absent, yet can be pain free in the presence of large spurs? Also, why can the clinical findings vary so much, even in the same individual? Shouldn't simple rest bring relief in time? Why should feet ache all night? Surely if we all walk or run enough, get fat enough or depressed enough, we should all get PF, but this is not the case. If steroids, anti-inflammatories and the numerous other treatment modalities don't bring relief, which you would expect them to, then to my mind, there has to be another etiology.
I am convinced the condition is immunologically based, and, as I said, it is the Jade's rather extraordinary immunomodulatory properties that have led me to that belief.
I don't in the least expect my medical colleagues to concur with me, but my patients usually improve in a few weeks applying a bit of cream, and that's not bad..

Re: Interactions/precautions?

Steve P on 6/04/01 at 10:04 (049831)

Dr. Reynolds --- Thanks for your detailed response above.

Do any precautions apply to the use of this balm? Are there any drug interactions, etc., that might be of concern? For example, could one continue to take an oral NSAID while using the balm?

Thanks.

Re: Interactions/precautions?

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 6/04/01 at hrmin (049835)

None that I am aware of and I've been using it on my patients, family and friends for five years without complaint.

Re: Interactions/precautions?

john a on 6/04/01 at 12:51 (049854)

Since you must have already seen results of the Jade 168 Balm on family and friends, it might be of interest to post the outcomes. For example, what percentage of people with severe heel pain have experienced significant improvement after using the balm for a length of time? (perhaps you mentioned that in a past post, but I didn't notice it).

Re: Interactions/precautions?

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 6/05/01 at hrmin (049958)

I have been using Jade 168 Balm on PF patients for about five years and have not kept detailed records basically because I was too busy. I just got used to people improving, sometimes dramatically in a short period of time. I tried telling my medical colleagues, but it was like talking to a brick wall - a mocking one at that. Eventually, I didn't bother any more and just quietly continued helping my patients's symptoms improve.Many patients were lost to follow up or only came once and never returned. It is also important to know that I don't only use the Jade for PF. I use it in all manner of clinical conditions such as wound healing, other inflammatory conditions and as a very effective hemostat and skin softener. I cannot explain these phenomena, but firmly believe they are immunomodulatory in nature.
Ignoring the PF patients lost to follow up, (maybe their symptoms resolved and they didn't bother coming back, or maybe they threw the Jade in the bin in disgust - I don't know). But of the others I have treated, like a 50 year old woman who last Friday reported complete resolution of symptoms in 10 days after 10 years disability, I must honestly say they have all had at least some symptomatic improvement. I also have many anecdotes of others improving to varying degrees. If a patient has not improved after 2 or 3 months' treatment, my advice to them would be to give it a miss and resume or maintain their previous therapy. I am not a naturopath, but I understand they usually advise patients to continue complementary therapies for chronic conditions for at least 6 months before giving up. I don't know if that is based on science or anticipated sales figures, but it does seem a bit long to me.
I do NOT expect the forthcoming trial to return 100% 'condition improved' reports, but if I can help even ten percent of individuals improve, and I am sure I can, then I think that is a worthwhile achievement.

Re: Interactions/precautions?

wendyn on 6/05/01 at 07:43 (049966)

I suppose Dr Chris. But 10% relief is a pretty small number. There may be a good chance that those 10% may have felt better with no help at all. I think the improvement has to be statistically significant to call it a 'cure' - and from your first post it sounds more like we should be expecting some very high positive results.

Re: Interactions/precautions?

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 6/05/01 at hrmin (049978)

Ten percent is quite a conservative estimate. I know the Jade can do better than that, but it would be extremely irresponsible of me to even suggest a 100% improvement. Let's see what the trial shows. We should start getting some feedback in about three weeks.

Re: Jade 168 Balm clinical trial

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 6/05/01 at hrmin (050031)

Thank you to everyone who applied for the Jade 168 Balm trial. The 20 places have been filled on a first come first served basis. I expect we will start getting some responses in about 3 or 4 weeks or less.

Re: Jade 168 Balm clinical trial

BrianG on 6/06/01 at 09:43 (050057)

Hope I got in on time! If I can be cured, this balm is a 'miracle cure'

BCG

Re: Jade 168 Balm

LynneA on 6/15/01 at hrmin (050800)

I would love to be able to buy some of this balm. I live in Singapore. Any suggestions?

Re: Foot Pain

Steve P on 5/30/01 at 16:47 (049378)

Hi Joan --- Read the 'PF Book' on this website & see a specialist right away. I recommend Sports Medicine (1st choice) or Orthopedic (2nd).

Best...........Steve

Re: Foot Pain

Jen S on 5/30/01 at 20:58 (049410)

I seem to experience a greater amount of tenderness not only upon my first step in the morning, but just after a workout mid day. These activties are at opposite ends of the spectum in terms of impact on the facia...and neither of which I am willing to sacrifice, pain or no pain. Any reason why I would experience pain after doing nothing, and also pain after significant activity? One would think it would be either or, not both.
ALso, I can often see bruising on the bottom of my foot, almost like I have stepped on a big, sharp rock. Does this indicate that the injury is more severe?
Thanks!!

Re: Foot Pain

Julie on 5/31/01 at 03:10 (049436)

Hi Joan

I'm sorry about the pain you're in, but I guess you may have to reframe your attitude to it. The 'pain or no pain' mind set is what has landed many people with chronic plantar fasciitis. They were determined to run through the pain, or walk through the pain, or work out through the pain, and a condition that could have been cleared up relatively quickly (i.e. in months) turned into a debilitating, possibly life-long affliction.

I don't know whether PF is what you have, and you don't either, so there is no point in speculating. But I do know that with that level of pain, and the unexplained bruising, you need to see a foot specialist, fast.

And in the meantime, sacrifice the workout. That may seem quite unthinkable to you now, but believe me, backing of f it for however long it takes you to heal is a far better option than pressing on with it and ending up disabled.

Read the heel pain book. Ask questions here when you know what questions you need to ask. And see a foot doctor.

All the best, Julie

Re: Foot Pain - to Joan and Jen

Julie on 5/31/01 at 03:12 (049437)

I see that I've mixed up your two posts: I read 'Joan' for 'Jen'. I hope the post still makes sense to both of you.

Re: Foot Pain

Dr. Chris R on 6/02/01 at hrmin (049660)

Sounds like plantar fasciitis. The pain does not necessarily have to be on the heel. For all the blurb written on plantar fasciitis,not to mention the myriad of treatment modalities, in my experience over 30 years as a doctor, nothing works. Nothing that is until I started using a complementary product called Jade 168 Balm about 5 years ago. Using twice daily application, I have had some extraordinary results in quite a large number of patients - even a prominent neurosurgeon who then wouldn't prescribe it for his own patients because it was 'natural'. Most of my patients have had complete cures, sometimes in a few days, after putting up with the problem for twelve years or more. Sometimes it takes a month, but it usually works quite quickly if you persist. Let me know if you want more information. It's pretty cheap for what it does.
Dr. Chris

Re: Foot Pain - to Joan and Jen

jen on 6/02/01 at 18:53 (049701)

You can imagine my frustration and heart break when the doctor I visited last week regarding my heel pain looked at me like I was a big baby. I was prescribed ASA and told to go home.
I am grateful for this website and some clarification on this condition. Thanks for your advice and help.

Re: Foot Pain - to Joan and Jen

Julie on 6/03/01 at 02:57 (049727)

Jen (got it right this time) - what sort of doctor was it? If it was a general practitioner, he can (almost) be forgiven for not knowing anything about heel pain. If it was, go find a podiatrist. If it was a podiatrist, go find another podiatrist. You need a full biomechanical evaluation and diagnosis so that you can get a treatment strategy in place.

Yes, it's frustrating, but carry on until you find a doctor who is knowledgeable, patient, and willing to work with you so that you can recover. Meanwhile, educate yourself with the heel pain book and the message boards. Don't give up, and don't break your heart over this setback.

Re: Dr --- When you say "nothing works" are you including ESWT? eom

Steve P on 6/03/01 at 09:23 (049741)

.

Re: Is PF really a mechanical problem? I doubt it.

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 6/04/01 at hrmin (049828)

The reason I say 'nothing works' is that I believe the etiological approach to the management of PF is fundamentally flawed.
Because the Jade 168 Balm that I mentioned a few days ago is quite potent as an anti-inflammatory, hemostat and wound healer, it must have to my way of thinking, immunomodulatory properties. In other words, it tends (though not always) to 'normalise' damaged tissue. In PF it has worked in varying degrees for a number of patients, sometimes dramatically within a day or two of application, but more often over several weeks. This rapid response to a chronic (years long) condition therefore made me ponder deeply the whole clinical model of PF.
I believe the mechanical 'over-stretching','overweight', 'calcaneal spur' etc. theory about the causation of PF is seriously flawed, simplistic and probably entirely wrong. There are too many variables that remain unexplained. For instance, why do people suffer severe pain when spurs are absent, yet can be pain free in the presence of large spurs? Also, why can the clinical findings vary so much, even in the same individual? Shouldn't simple rest bring relief in time? Why should feet ache all night? Surely if we all walk or run enough, get fat enough or depressed enough, we should all get PF, but this is not the case. If steroids, anti-inflammatories and the numerous other treatment modalities don't bring relief, which you would expect them to, then to my mind, there has to be another etiology.
I am convinced the condition is immunologically based, and, as I said, it is the Jade's rather extraordinary immunomodulatory properties that have led me to that belief.
I don't in the least expect my medical colleagues to concur with me, but my patients usually improve in a few weeks applying a bit of cream, and that's not bad..

Re: Interactions/precautions?

Steve P on 6/04/01 at 10:04 (049831)

Dr. Reynolds --- Thanks for your detailed response above.

Do any precautions apply to the use of this balm? Are there any drug interactions, etc., that might be of concern? For example, could one continue to take an oral NSAID while using the balm?

Thanks.

Re: Interactions/precautions?

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 6/04/01 at hrmin (049835)

None that I am aware of and I've been using it on my patients, family and friends for five years without complaint.

Re: Interactions/precautions?

john a on 6/04/01 at 12:51 (049854)

Since you must have already seen results of the Jade 168 Balm on family and friends, it might be of interest to post the outcomes. For example, what percentage of people with severe heel pain have experienced significant improvement after using the balm for a length of time? (perhaps you mentioned that in a past post, but I didn't notice it).

Re: Interactions/precautions?

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 6/05/01 at hrmin (049958)

I have been using Jade 168 Balm on PF patients for about five years and have not kept detailed records basically because I was too busy. I just got used to people improving, sometimes dramatically in a short period of time. I tried telling my medical colleagues, but it was like talking to a brick wall - a mocking one at that. Eventually, I didn't bother any more and just quietly continued helping my patients's symptoms improve.Many patients were lost to follow up or only came once and never returned. It is also important to know that I don't only use the Jade for PF. I use it in all manner of clinical conditions such as wound healing, other inflammatory conditions and as a very effective hemostat and skin softener. I cannot explain these phenomena, but firmly believe they are immunomodulatory in nature.
Ignoring the PF patients lost to follow up, (maybe their symptoms resolved and they didn't bother coming back, or maybe they threw the Jade in the bin in disgust - I don't know). But of the others I have treated, like a 50 year old woman who last Friday reported complete resolution of symptoms in 10 days after 10 years disability, I must honestly say they have all had at least some symptomatic improvement. I also have many anecdotes of others improving to varying degrees. If a patient has not improved after 2 or 3 months' treatment, my advice to them would be to give it a miss and resume or maintain their previous therapy. I am not a naturopath, but I understand they usually advise patients to continue complementary therapies for chronic conditions for at least 6 months before giving up. I don't know if that is based on science or anticipated sales figures, but it does seem a bit long to me.
I do NOT expect the forthcoming trial to return 100% 'condition improved' reports, but if I can help even ten percent of individuals improve, and I am sure I can, then I think that is a worthwhile achievement.

Re: Interactions/precautions?

wendyn on 6/05/01 at 07:43 (049966)

I suppose Dr Chris. But 10% relief is a pretty small number. There may be a good chance that those 10% may have felt better with no help at all. I think the improvement has to be statistically significant to call it a 'cure' - and from your first post it sounds more like we should be expecting some very high positive results.

Re: Interactions/precautions?

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 6/05/01 at hrmin (049978)

Ten percent is quite a conservative estimate. I know the Jade can do better than that, but it would be extremely irresponsible of me to even suggest a 100% improvement. Let's see what the trial shows. We should start getting some feedback in about three weeks.

Re: Jade 168 Balm clinical trial

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 6/05/01 at hrmin (050031)

Thank you to everyone who applied for the Jade 168 Balm trial. The 20 places have been filled on a first come first served basis. I expect we will start getting some responses in about 3 or 4 weeks or less.

Re: Jade 168 Balm clinical trial

BrianG on 6/06/01 at 09:43 (050057)

Hope I got in on time! If I can be cured, this balm is a 'miracle cure'

BCG

Re: Jade 168 Balm

LynneA on 6/15/01 at hrmin (050800)

I would love to be able to buy some of this balm. I live in Singapore. Any suggestions?