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Biking and tarsal tunnel

Posted by GinaC on 6/04/01 at 12:09 (049850)

I had open PF release, distal TT release and spur excision in Mid-March. Have developed tendonitis in my shoulder and elbow which led me to stop swimming and try stationary biking. Experimented with a recumbent and a regular/upright bike last week. After both biking trials I had increased pain in the inner ankle region in both feet, surgical and nonsurgical alike. Is there any physiological reason the biking should cause what seemed to be nerve pain? Any ideas appreciated....I'm running out of exercise alternatives and working body parts!

Re: Biking and tarsal tunnel

wendyn on 6/04/01 at 13:08 (049858)

Gina (I am not a doctor).

When my TTS was bad - biking really aggravated it, contrary to what the doctors thought.

I think you probably need more time - or slow down the pedalling.

Re: Biking and tarsal tunnel

Matt L on 6/04/01 at 13:35 (049866)

Hi Gina (assuming you're the Gina from Ossatron/Toronto fame?). I've been reading your posts and am sorry to hear you aren't 'cured' yet. I actually had tts surgery in '96 before PF. Now am fighting a reoccurence due most likely to scar tissue.

What do you mean by 'distal' tts release? What part of the foot was your pain in prior to surgery? What did they release? Oddly, my pain is mostly on the outside sole of my foot (before the '96 surgery it was medial part on the sole). As to biking- it is the only significant exercise I've gotten for the past 2-3 years- my tennis and basketball days are history- even golf. In my case, anything that is weightbearing is going to hurt. Biking is not always painfree but is tolerable in my case.

By the way, I do consider the ESWT treatments I've received (on my non-tts foot) to be a qualified success- I've been able to avoid a pf surgery so far because of the treatments but don't feel that it will be a permanent solution. Regards.

Re: Biking and tarsal tunnel

Donna SL on 6/04/01 at 13:36 (049867)

Gina,

I would give the swimming a try again. It's very important to stetch the sholders, arms. etc. before and after swimming. I had a lot of trouble in these areas when I first stareted, but then followed various swimmer stretches I found on the web, and now have no problems. Also try swimming on your back. Start out very slowly. You can hold on to a kick board, and use your legs to get across the pool.

My physiatrist said the best thing for TTS, post surgery, etc. is pool walking. If your pool doesn't have one, buy an aqua-jogger. You put it around your waist, and it will hold you upright, so you can walk or run across the pool. Even just making gentle circular motions with your legs while you wear it will help. You can also do regular swimming on your back, and front with it on, and there is less stress on your arms. This will increase circulation, and aid in healing. You can also twist around with it on, move your arms around, etc.

Also, some light weight training would help to get your legs, and upper body muscle strength back. You can do your quads, hamstrings, etc., sitting. or lying down. Also most upper body weight training can be done in a sitting position. If possible work with a personal trainer.

I would try biking again after you've gained some strength in your entire legs from the above exercises, so your lower legs aren't doing all the work. Start out on a very low setting, and for short periods on a recumbent bike which will put much less pressure on your lower legs. Also pedal using your midfoot. Also stretch before and after.

Donna

Re: Biking and tarsal tunnel

Marty B on 6/04/01 at hrmin (049872)

GinaC,

I was an avid weight lifter for many years and I found that if I could get my shoulders warmed up real good before lifting and then to ice them down for 10 minutes afterwards that my problem cleared up quite fast. This might apply to swimming as well. Wish I lived near a pool because I beleive it would help my feet out bunches.

-Marty

Re: odd TT

GinaC on 6/04/01 at 15:13 (049883)

Hi Matt--yes, it's me, your follow Toronto-guest! I developed TT in both feet after Ossatron, but never had 'nerve' or ankle pain in the foot that was operated on. Dr's philosophy was that if you're going in surgically, take care of everything that could cause pain, so that's what we did. The TT release was done thru the same 2 and a half inch incision as the PF release. I think distal refers to a location further down the nerve path. I was really surprised to get the positive TT diagnosis from nerve conduction tests, cause I never could identify any nerve pain; it all felt like PF pain in the heel area to me.

On my right foot, I do have numbness in the toes and some ankle pain, though I feel the Ossatron probably did help the PF in that foot, which was always milder. Have not made a decision about what to do with the right foot at this point.

Good to hear from you--seems like it's always something! Hope you find a solution for your current problem. Gina

Re: aqua jogger

GinaC on 6/04/01 at 15:35 (049888)

Thanks for all the great ideas. I'm tempted to try deep-water aqua-jogging at this point, but would have to drive to a more distant pool since the one I've been using is a 4' lap pool. Since I was swimming a mile a day for years prior to the onset of shoulder tendonitis a few weeks ago, I feel my upper/lower body strength is fine--would just like to maintain what I have. But I should try stretching before swimming when I'm ready for that again. Although everyone asks 'isn't swimming boring?' I never knew the meaning of boredom till I had to start using the kickboard to do laps for 30-45 minutes!!! lol!

My surgeon also felt that swimming would be a great aid in healing after surgery and I was back in the pool two weeks after surgery. But I want to be very careful with this shoulder problem since I don't want to deal with another long-term injury, like PF was for me.

Re: thanks, wendy!

GinaC on 6/04/01 at 15:36 (049889)

Thanks for reassuring me that I'm not the only one to have this happen--it sure suprised me!

Re: Biking and tarsal tunnel

wendyn on 6/04/01 at 13:08 (049858)

Gina (I am not a doctor).

When my TTS was bad - biking really aggravated it, contrary to what the doctors thought.

I think you probably need more time - or slow down the pedalling.

Re: Biking and tarsal tunnel

Matt L on 6/04/01 at 13:35 (049866)

Hi Gina (assuming you're the Gina from Ossatron/Toronto fame?). I've been reading your posts and am sorry to hear you aren't 'cured' yet. I actually had tts surgery in '96 before PF. Now am fighting a reoccurence due most likely to scar tissue.

What do you mean by 'distal' tts release? What part of the foot was your pain in prior to surgery? What did they release? Oddly, my pain is mostly on the outside sole of my foot (before the '96 surgery it was medial part on the sole). As to biking- it is the only significant exercise I've gotten for the past 2-3 years- my tennis and basketball days are history- even golf. In my case, anything that is weightbearing is going to hurt. Biking is not always painfree but is tolerable in my case.

By the way, I do consider the ESWT treatments I've received (on my non-tts foot) to be a qualified success- I've been able to avoid a pf surgery so far because of the treatments but don't feel that it will be a permanent solution. Regards.

Re: Biking and tarsal tunnel

Donna SL on 6/04/01 at 13:36 (049867)

Gina,

I would give the swimming a try again. It's very important to stetch the sholders, arms. etc. before and after swimming. I had a lot of trouble in these areas when I first stareted, but then followed various swimmer stretches I found on the web, and now have no problems. Also try swimming on your back. Start out very slowly. You can hold on to a kick board, and use your legs to get across the pool.

My physiatrist said the best thing for TTS, post surgery, etc. is pool walking. If your pool doesn't have one, buy an aqua-jogger. You put it around your waist, and it will hold you upright, so you can walk or run across the pool. Even just making gentle circular motions with your legs while you wear it will help. You can also do regular swimming on your back, and front with it on, and there is less stress on your arms. This will increase circulation, and aid in healing. You can also twist around with it on, move your arms around, etc.

Also, some light weight training would help to get your legs, and upper body muscle strength back. You can do your quads, hamstrings, etc., sitting. or lying down. Also most upper body weight training can be done in a sitting position. If possible work with a personal trainer.

I would try biking again after you've gained some strength in your entire legs from the above exercises, so your lower legs aren't doing all the work. Start out on a very low setting, and for short periods on a recumbent bike which will put much less pressure on your lower legs. Also pedal using your midfoot. Also stretch before and after.

Donna

Re: Biking and tarsal tunnel

Marty B on 6/04/01 at hrmin (049872)

GinaC,

I was an avid weight lifter for many years and I found that if I could get my shoulders warmed up real good before lifting and then to ice them down for 10 minutes afterwards that my problem cleared up quite fast. This might apply to swimming as well. Wish I lived near a pool because I beleive it would help my feet out bunches.

-Marty

Re: odd TT

GinaC on 6/04/01 at 15:13 (049883)

Hi Matt--yes, it's me, your follow Toronto-guest! I developed TT in both feet after Ossatron, but never had 'nerve' or ankle pain in the foot that was operated on. Dr's philosophy was that if you're going in surgically, take care of everything that could cause pain, so that's what we did. The TT release was done thru the same 2 and a half inch incision as the PF release. I think distal refers to a location further down the nerve path. I was really surprised to get the positive TT diagnosis from nerve conduction tests, cause I never could identify any nerve pain; it all felt like PF pain in the heel area to me.

On my right foot, I do have numbness in the toes and some ankle pain, though I feel the Ossatron probably did help the PF in that foot, which was always milder. Have not made a decision about what to do with the right foot at this point.

Good to hear from you--seems like it's always something! Hope you find a solution for your current problem. Gina

Re: aqua jogger

GinaC on 6/04/01 at 15:35 (049888)

Thanks for all the great ideas. I'm tempted to try deep-water aqua-jogging at this point, but would have to drive to a more distant pool since the one I've been using is a 4' lap pool. Since I was swimming a mile a day for years prior to the onset of shoulder tendonitis a few weeks ago, I feel my upper/lower body strength is fine--would just like to maintain what I have. But I should try stretching before swimming when I'm ready for that again. Although everyone asks 'isn't swimming boring?' I never knew the meaning of boredom till I had to start using the kickboard to do laps for 30-45 minutes!!! lol!

My surgeon also felt that swimming would be a great aid in healing after surgery and I was back in the pool two weeks after surgery. But I want to be very careful with this shoulder problem since I don't want to deal with another long-term injury, like PF was for me.

Re: thanks, wendy!

GinaC on 6/04/01 at 15:36 (049889)

Thanks for reassuring me that I'm not the only one to have this happen--it sure suprised me!