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For Richard, ski boot question

Posted by josh s on 6/10/01 at hrmin (050374)

Hi Richard, I just visited your website and seeing that you are expert with ski boots would like to ask you a question regarding. When I was 16 I bought a pair of Raichle Flexon Comps (1990) even though I have a high instep with a prominence above first cuneiform. The boots had little volume, were too narrow and worse had a cant adjustment. I cut a piece out of the instep shell to allow the prominence some room, but they still caused lack of circulation when buckled tight.

I remember reading the booklet explaining the canting and thinking since I pronated that perhaps if I canted the opposite direction from recommended I could correct the pronation. I don't recall which way I canted but I do remember that I ended up on my outside edges, so that to set my inside edge I had to buckle the knee inward (valgus). After a day skiing in these things my lower leg muscles would ache like mad, but I kept wearing them as I was a broke kid and got the expensive buggers with a proform. At the time I thought that the problem was thick calves in narrow boots causing compression. Thinking back, the aching in the leg was mostly on the outside and I wonder if I was'nt cranking tight my peroneals in an effort to evert the foot and set that inside edge. To this day I have very tight peroneus longus muscles, which I've assumed is from effort to plantarflex first ray to counteract first ray dorsiflexion forced by ankle equinus.

Also, this boot had an insert to adjust the cuff angle in the sagittal plane. I'd been told that I tended to lean back while skiing (probably due to equinus) so I put in the insert that put the knee farthest out over the toe. Probably too far for my equinus which probably did'nt help the pronation I was trying to eliminate with my mad reverse canting folly.

Anyway, I wore these awful things for two seasons of jumps and moguls. I was in constant discomfort/pain in my legs and this is definately the most sustained stupidity of my life. The next year I developed chrondomalacia patella and arch pain which have come and gone ever since. I never skied again.

I've often wondered if this did'nt cause my present troubles (though it seems the equinus existed prior). Have you ever heard of anyone canting their boots backwards? Any thoughts on what could have happened mechanically or otherwise to my legs and feet from such abuse? Could insight gained from this help in orthotic therapy?

Skiing with such skewed alignment must have created some very strange muscular patterns which persist to this day.

Re: For Richard, ski boot question

mike/cped/masterbootfitter(snowkiing) on 6/11/01 at hrmin (050438)

Hey Josh,
Richard and I are partners in the pedorthic busness, I have about 10 years experience working as a bootfitter at our ski shop here. Your question about canting has a very specific answer. Your ski has to be perfectly flat under your body in order to track correctly. The 'canting' adjustment on the side of your boot will work to adjust this on about 25% of the people we have worked with. On the rest of the population we have to cant the boot under the sole by adding cant wedges under the binding or plaining the sole of the boot to the correct angle.
As far as the equinus problem, we can stretch the instep of the boot to releave presure on the instep and provide a very firm, neutrally posted footbed, to increase stability.
Strong inverter and everter muscles are a great thing to have in skiing, be happy!
There is a lot more going on in bootfitting than just comfort, Leave a message on our e-mail site, I'll get back to you with a phone number and we can discuss just how to solve your problems.
Our ski shop is listed in Ski Magazine amoung Americas Best Bootfitters, (not bragging here). We have customers come in our shop from as far away as Sararsota Fla. and Cincinati Oh.
Mike.

Re: For Richard, ski boot question

mike/cped/masterbootfitter(snowkiing) on 6/11/01 at hrmin (050438)

Hey Josh,
Richard and I are partners in the pedorthic busness, I have about 10 years experience working as a bootfitter at our ski shop here. Your question about canting has a very specific answer. Your ski has to be perfectly flat under your body in order to track correctly. The 'canting' adjustment on the side of your boot will work to adjust this on about 25% of the people we have worked with. On the rest of the population we have to cant the boot under the sole by adding cant wedges under the binding or plaining the sole of the boot to the correct angle.
As far as the equinus problem, we can stretch the instep of the boot to releave presure on the instep and provide a very firm, neutrally posted footbed, to increase stability.
Strong inverter and everter muscles are a great thing to have in skiing, be happy!
There is a lot more going on in bootfitting than just comfort, Leave a message on our e-mail site, I'll get back to you with a phone number and we can discuss just how to solve your problems.
Our ski shop is listed in Ski Magazine amoung Americas Best Bootfitters, (not bragging here). We have customers come in our shop from as far away as Sararsota Fla. and Cincinati Oh.
Mike.