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Heels down! Could my riding career have contributed to this?

Posted by Rebecca on 6/22/01 at 15:47 (051273)

I've developed PF in my left foot, and thought that it was the result of stepping on a pebble on the way to take out the garbage. (It really did hurt, and seems to be when this whole thing started.)

But there's one other thing I'm wondering about...I've been riding horses for years now, and in December (about the same time as the pebble incident) I changed my discipline and started riding jumpers. My instructor had me really pushing my heels down and my leg forward. My calf muscles are usually pretty flexible, and I haven't worn high heel shoes in years, but even so I did notice some pain, mostly in my ankles. Is it possible that stretching my heel down etc. might have damaged my PF?

Thanks...

Re: Heels down! Could my riding career have contributed to this?

Dr. Biehler on 6/22/01 at 19:40 (051297)

The answer is yes. The change in the way the activity was being done, might have been just enough to cause the injury. Dr. B.

Re: Heels down! Could my riding career have contributed to this?

Dr. Zuckerman- Denise Ashcraft on 6/22/01 at 21:58 (051300)

From: Denise Ashcraft <dashnj@bee.net>
To: <footcare@home.com>
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2001 8:25 PM
Subject: Re: Heels down! Could my riding career have contributed to this.htm

Denise Ashcraft who is my ESWT coordinator and has and rides horses.Actually has a horse farm has bee kind enough to give us some insight on this very close to home question.

Here's how I'm thinking this through...( Denise Ashcraft )

The heels down position is pretty unnatural. You do have to force the
leg to do this. I'm not sure if it would lead to this but here's my
thinking.

The stirrups are up higher than they would normally be for jumping I
imagine.
Then you are pressing the heels down. I can imagine that would put undue
pressure and stress especially when maintaining that position while the
horse is in motion.

There is a woman (I can't remember her name) who's business is the
biomechanics
of the horse and rider. For women especially. Most disciplines, saddles,
etc. were designed for men's bodies and hip position. With the way a
woman's hips are forced to sit in a man's saddle the leg is already at
a funny angle then forcing it straight down is even worse. She teaches
an entirely different way to sit for women and it's much better for balance,
knee pain and back. She's also working with saddle manufacturers to scoop
the seats differently to place a woman's hips at the right angle. It
all made a lot of sense to me when she explained it.

That's about it from me on this subject. My 2nd tip is, if that hurts,
don't do it!

Re: Heels down! Could my riding career have contributed to this?

Richard, C.Ped on 6/26/01 at 15:58 (051564)

You learn something every day!! Great information Denise!
Richard

Re: Heels down! Could my riding career have contributed to this?

Dr. Biehler on 6/22/01 at 19:40 (051297)

The answer is yes. The change in the way the activity was being done, might have been just enough to cause the injury. Dr. B.

Re: Heels down! Could my riding career have contributed to this?

Dr. Zuckerman- Denise Ashcraft on 6/22/01 at 21:58 (051300)

From: Denise Ashcraft <dashnj@bee.net>
To: <footcare@home.com>
Sent: Friday, June 22, 2001 8:25 PM
Subject: Re: Heels down! Could my riding career have contributed to this.htm

Denise Ashcraft who is my ESWT coordinator and has and rides horses.Actually has a horse farm has bee kind enough to give us some insight on this very close to home question.

Here's how I'm thinking this through...( Denise Ashcraft )

The heels down position is pretty unnatural. You do have to force the
leg to do this. I'm not sure if it would lead to this but here's my
thinking.

The stirrups are up higher than they would normally be for jumping I
imagine.
Then you are pressing the heels down. I can imagine that would put undue
pressure and stress especially when maintaining that position while the
horse is in motion.

There is a woman (I can't remember her name) who's business is the
biomechanics
of the horse and rider. For women especially. Most disciplines, saddles,
etc. were designed for men's bodies and hip position. With the way a
woman's hips are forced to sit in a man's saddle the leg is already at
a funny angle then forcing it straight down is even worse. She teaches
an entirely different way to sit for women and it's much better for balance,
knee pain and back. She's also working with saddle manufacturers to scoop
the seats differently to place a woman's hips at the right angle. It
all made a lot of sense to me when she explained it.

That's about it from me on this subject. My 2nd tip is, if that hurts,
don't do it!

Re: Heels down! Could my riding career have contributed to this?

Richard, C.Ped on 6/26/01 at 15:58 (051564)

You learn something every day!! Great information Denise!
Richard