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Psoriatic Athritis

Posted by Mark on 6/22/01 at 18:25 (051289)

I was diagnosed as having psoriatic arthritis, plantar ficiitis and achillis tendonitis the pain is excruciating, I can barely get out of bed. I was on sulpharazine for two years without any change and seeing a physio therapist regulally but it didn't help. I have been put on methotrexate the arthritis is a little better but with my feet i can still barely walk without needing to sit every five minutes because of my restricted movement I walk with all the weightt on my heels, i was wondering if there were any treatment's i could follow myself as i have been waiting months for an appiontment with a foot specialist.

Mark, 22
England

Re: Psoriatic Athritis

Julie on 6/23/01 at hrmin (051329)

Hi Mark

I am not a doctor, but I want to welcome you to heelspurs.com and to suggest that you read the heel pain book on this site. It contains a wealth of information about plantar fasciitis and ideas about how it can be dealt with. Taping, icing, and above all REST - and perhaps appropriate stretching (but be careful and avoid weight-bearing stretches for now). Orthotics to correct biomechanical faults may be called for (you need to be evaluated properly). Never go barefoot: always wear well-made shoes that give good support. Lots of us like Birkenstocks, and there are several makes of good trainers you can investigate.

But you do need to see a foot specialist, sooner rather than later. I live in the UK myself and know what waiting lists are like. Several months is too long! Could you perhaps afford to consult a good podiatrist privately? If you live in London, I can give you the name of mine: he charges, to the best of my recollection, ?60 for a full evaluation and diagnosis, and advice, and ?20 for follow-up treatments. My experience was that having informed myself (thanks to this website, the heel pain book, and the knowledge of other participants here) I only needed to see him two more times (the third was for the casting of orthotics, which I was deemed to need and which have helped). Once you have the knowledge you need, and have got a treatment plan in place, you may not need any more than that.

If you want his details, click on my blue name above and e-mail me.

A question: has it been suggested that there is a link between your psoriatic arthritis (which as I understand it is an auto-immune illness) and your foot problems?

All the best

Julie

Re: Psoriatic Athritis

Julie on 6/23/01 at 07:08 (051330)

PS - my keyboard is behaving mysterioously. The question mark was meant to be a Pound sign.

Re: Psoriatic Athritis

ellen w on 6/26/01 at 13:28 (051560)

Mark,

I don't have anything to add to the excellen advice Julie gave about your movement problems, but if you are also having problems with flaking skin associated with psoriasis, this is what worked for me: a topically applied corticosteroid cream covered over with a product called Duoderm. In the States, the cream needed a prescription, but the Duoderm is available over the counter, but needs to be specially ordered by a pharmacist. It's normally used for wound healing and is a patch that adheres to skin and covers open areas. Applying it over a topical cream seems to intensive the action of the cream. The cream by itself did not resolve the psoriasis, but together, the two products worked.
Good luck,
Ellen

Re: Psoriatic Athritis

Mark on 6/29/01 at 15:25 (051880)

Ellen

The psoriasis is a problem and i am currently using a cream called diprosalic but it isn't working, i would be a bit wary about mixing medication so i'd ask my doctor first or if any docters on this sight can tell me if this has any side effects.

If it did work it would be a god send.

Re: Psoriatic Athritis

ellen on 7/02/01 at 10:01 (052060)

Hi Mark,

The Duoderm isn't a medication but a covering for it that intensives the action of whatever medication you're using. Hopefully, the cream you're using will work, but if it doesn't, ask your doc about this technique.
ellen

Re: Psoriatic Athritis

Julie on 6/23/01 at hrmin (051329)

Hi Mark

I am not a doctor, but I want to welcome you to heelspurs.com and to suggest that you read the heel pain book on this site. It contains a wealth of information about plantar fasciitis and ideas about how it can be dealt with. Taping, icing, and above all REST - and perhaps appropriate stretching (but be careful and avoid weight-bearing stretches for now). Orthotics to correct biomechanical faults may be called for (you need to be evaluated properly). Never go barefoot: always wear well-made shoes that give good support. Lots of us like Birkenstocks, and there are several makes of good trainers you can investigate.

But you do need to see a foot specialist, sooner rather than later. I live in the UK myself and know what waiting lists are like. Several months is too long! Could you perhaps afford to consult a good podiatrist privately? If you live in London, I can give you the name of mine: he charges, to the best of my recollection, ?60 for a full evaluation and diagnosis, and advice, and ?20 for follow-up treatments. My experience was that having informed myself (thanks to this website, the heel pain book, and the knowledge of other participants here) I only needed to see him two more times (the third was for the casting of orthotics, which I was deemed to need and which have helped). Once you have the knowledge you need, and have got a treatment plan in place, you may not need any more than that.

If you want his details, click on my blue name above and e-mail me.

A question: has it been suggested that there is a link between your psoriatic arthritis (which as I understand it is an auto-immune illness) and your foot problems?

All the best

Julie

Re: Psoriatic Athritis

Julie on 6/23/01 at 07:08 (051330)

PS - my keyboard is behaving mysterioously. The question mark was meant to be a Pound sign.

Re: Psoriatic Athritis

ellen w on 6/26/01 at 13:28 (051560)

Mark,

I don't have anything to add to the excellen advice Julie gave about your movement problems, but if you are also having problems with flaking skin associated with psoriasis, this is what worked for me: a topically applied corticosteroid cream covered over with a product called Duoderm. In the States, the cream needed a prescription, but the Duoderm is available over the counter, but needs to be specially ordered by a pharmacist. It's normally used for wound healing and is a patch that adheres to skin and covers open areas. Applying it over a topical cream seems to intensive the action of the cream. The cream by itself did not resolve the psoriasis, but together, the two products worked.
Good luck,
Ellen

Re: Psoriatic Athritis

Mark on 6/29/01 at 15:25 (051880)

Ellen

The psoriasis is a problem and i am currently using a cream called diprosalic but it isn't working, i would be a bit wary about mixing medication so i'd ask my doctor first or if any docters on this sight can tell me if this has any side effects.

If it did work it would be a god send.

Re: Psoriatic Athritis

ellen on 7/02/01 at 10:01 (052060)

Hi Mark,

The Duoderm isn't a medication but a covering for it that intensives the action of whatever medication you're using. Hopefully, the cream you're using will work, but if it doesn't, ask your doc about this technique.
ellen