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Mortons Nuroma- alternatives to surgery

Posted by gabriel B. on 6/27/01 at hrmin (051630)

I have had a nuroma in both feet for about 9 months now. i have had several injections, but none have really been satisfing as the very first one. I feel it is time to take steps on healing to another level with surgery on the bottem of my list. what are other available treatments that i may explore with that are not just a 'quick fix'. thanks in advance

Re: Mortons Nuroma- alternatives to surgery

Dr. David S. Wander on 6/27/01 at 14:41 (051651)

First, you must be sure that you actually have a 'neuroma'. When I see a patient that has not responded to 9 months of conservative care, I often recommend a gadolinium MRI or diagnostic ultrasound to confirm the presence of a neuroma. Options other than cortisone injections include physical therapy (which has very limited success with neuromas), metatarsal pads, shoe inserts, changes in shoegear, surgery and sclerosing injections. These injections involve injecting a solution of dehydrated alcohol and local anesthetic to 'sclerose' the neuroma. The usual protocol involves a series of a minimum of 3, and a maximum of 7 injections, spaced about 2 weeks apart. I have had a high rate of success performing this procedure on patients, which has allowed many patients to avoid surgery. Ask your doctor about this procedure, it may be beneficial to you.

Re: Mortons Nuroma- alternatives to surgery

Dr. David S. Wander on 6/27/01 at 14:41 (051651)

First, you must be sure that you actually have a 'neuroma'. When I see a patient that has not responded to 9 months of conservative care, I often recommend a gadolinium MRI or diagnostic ultrasound to confirm the presence of a neuroma. Options other than cortisone injections include physical therapy (which has very limited success with neuromas), metatarsal pads, shoe inserts, changes in shoegear, surgery and sclerosing injections. These injections involve injecting a solution of dehydrated alcohol and local anesthetic to 'sclerose' the neuroma. The usual protocol involves a series of a minimum of 3, and a maximum of 7 injections, spaced about 2 weeks apart. I have had a high rate of success performing this procedure on patients, which has allowed many patients to avoid surgery. Ask your doctor about this procedure, it may be beneficial to you.