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Re: Sound Waves & the Chiropractor

Posted by Denise D. on 7/02/01 at 01:42 (052029)

Hi All,
Well, I've been trying to enjoy my first few days of being off work for the month. I took it easy this past weekend, and I think my foot pain has eased a little bit. I wear an ankle brace when I'm up on my feet, take anti-inflammatory med, and bought tape for my foot, but haven't mastered the art of applying it!!! I need help in that dept. I looked at Scott's pictures on taping and tried his two tape method, that did't help me much. Is the tape suppose to be tight when standing? When my Pod taped my foot one time he ran a strip around my foot from one side then behind my heel to the other side, then used shorter strips all across the bottom of my foot going from side to side. I was curious as to whether improper taping could harm my foot, and I guess I'm just down right scared to wear it if its not applied right.
My Pod hasn't helped me much, or given much hope unless I agree to have surgery, which I don't want at this point.
I've requested info about the ESWT from Dr. Z's ofc which I haven't received yet, I'm anxiously awaiting its arrival!!
I'm off work for the entire month of July and I don't want to waste it as far as getting something done about my foot pain. I sure don't want to go back in August still having pain!!! Which leads to my next question, has anyone heard anything about ultrasound being used to treat heelspurs? Is that the same thing as shockwave therapy? If so what can you tell me, I talked to a friend who's sister went to a Chiropractor for the treatment, she said it cured her problem.
Thanks and best to you all,
Denise D.

Re: Sound Waves & the Chiropractor

john h on 7/02/01 at 08:25 (052040)

From someone who has had foot surgery (release & tts) and ESWT i strongly suggest you try everything before surgery. There are a lot of successful surgery stories but there are a lot of post where the patients are worse. Do not let the doctor push you into surgery.

Re: Re:Taping

Julie on 7/02/01 at 08:50 (052043)

Denise, maybe I can help you regarding taping. Although I need it less and less these days, during the months I did need it I found it a godsend.

To answer your question,the tape does need to be fairly tight when standing. Not too tight, but tight enough so that you can feel it. It's the tension in the tape that provides the support for the fascia. If the tape is just stuck onto the sole of the foot without tension, it won't be effective. On the other hand, if it is too tight, it pulls too hard and you know it!

I've always used the two-strip method, and have found it almost as supportive as the more complicated, more expensive methods. Holding my foot in neutral, i.e. neither plantar-flexed nor dorsiflexed, I start each strip at ball of the foot and pull it fairly tightly along the arch, till it curves a little around the heel. I overlap them slightly. I have found this gives the right tension for me. When I tried it with the foot dorsiflexed (bent back at the ankle) the tape was much too tight when I stood up, and I had to remove it instantly.

Scott does point out that you need to experiment to get the tension right for your foot. You'll know whether or not it's right by how it feels when you walk around a bit.

Other points to note are:

You need a good quality tape that will hold its tension once applied.

The tape should be removed at night so that the skin can recover. The skin softens and weakens if the tape is left on, especially if the tape gets wet. Don't be tempted to leave it on overnight and on into the next day. (This is one of the reasons I prefer the two-strip technique to the full wrap: the latter is usually left on for several days, which I think is bad news for the skin.)

The sticky residue can be removed with cotton and lighter fluid.

As the simple technique I've described worked for me, I wasn't motivated to try any of the others, but they would be worth experimenting with till you find one that works for you. Judy likes the 'figure 8' method, I know.

I don't think you need to fear doing yourself harm with tape. It will either help or it won't. It's certainly worth persevering, in my view.

Ultrasound is not the same as ESWT, although it does work on much the same principle. In introducing sound waves to the injured site, it kickstarts the healing process by stimulating blood flow. I had several treatments, and am glad I did, though it isn't possible to say whether it helped as I was doing lots of other things as well: taping, resting, icing, wearing Birkenstocks, orthotics with good trainers. The bottom line is that I have got better. Any or all of these conservative treatments - plus time - have worked. I'm now using Jade Balm in the hope that it will get rid of the last lingering vestiges (down to very mile discomfort when I really overdo things).

One last thought, having just re-read your post: if your pod seems to be pushing you towards surgery, and isn't giving you much help otherwise, try to find another. And most certainly, as John advised, consider ESWT before surgery even if, after trying everything for at least six months, nothing has helped. But I hope that won't be the case.

Enjoy your month off.

Re: Re:Taping

Julie on 7/02/01 at 08:53 (052045)

Sorry for the duplication. I got an error message saying 'your request couldn't be completed' the first time I posted the above, so tried again, and both have come through.

'M ild' not 'mile' discomfort.

Re: Taping

BrianG on 7/02/01 at 09:37 (052056)

Hi Denise,

I use the 2 strips of tape method quite a bit. I start right behind the toes and bring the tape all the way to at least an inch or two up the heel. Make sure your foot is not tensed up when your putting the tape on. I use two types of tape. One is brown and waterproof. It has a little give, so I stretch it out while putting it on. The other is a white sports tape and I put it on so that it's firm, but I really don't stretch it out. I then put my socks and shoes on, before my foot touches the ground. You should feel some tension if you've put it on correctly. If it's too tight, you'll know it, and will have to take it off.

It shouldn't take to long to get a good feel for it, and it should help. I know it's been a help for me. When taking it off, start up near the toes, and slowly peel it back. I once got an OUCH by starting at the heel and ripping it up towards the toes. Took off some skin !!! Good luck, don't give up on it.

BCG

Re: Taping

Julie on 7/02/01 at 09:58 (052059)

Brian, and Denise, the reference to taking off the skin reminds me. It happened once to me - if it does, you can still carry on taping as long as you put a small bandaid over the bit where the skin is broken.

Re: Taping

john h on 7/02/01 at 10:51 (052064)

are there not some spray products that you can spray your foot with before taping that would protect the skin?

Re: Taping

BrianG on 7/02/01 at 13:30 (052072)

Oh, right John. That will only be an additional $5.95 per week :*)
My Pod used it last time she taped me. I would imagine thats why it was $150 for a 15 minute office visit !!! When does it all stop?

BCG

PS I don't suppose we can write any of this stuff off on out taxes, can we?

Re: Taping

Denise D. on 7/02/01 at 15:23 (052080)

Thanks to you all for answering my taping questions.
I'm about to try the two strip method after I post this message.
I still have questions about soundwave treatment.
I'm so confused----some say never, never, never use heat on your feet, while others say its ok. (no rhyme intended!!!Ha!) So has anyone used this method? And if so what are the results? I understand that in order to heal it must rest, and the heat seems like it would provide good blood flow which would help the healing process. In the few months that I've been using this website, I haven't read much at all about deep heat treatment, that's why I want to learn more about it. Any info regarding this type of treatment would really be appreciated. Also, has anyone used a chiropractor for the treatment of heelspurs??
Thanks to you all,
Denise D.

Re: To John Re: Sound Waves & the Chiropractor

Denise D. on 7/02/01 at 15:26 (052081)

Hi John,
Thanks for the advise. I really don't want surgery and am leaning more towards alternative methods.
What experience did you have with the ESWT. That is something I have considered.
Thanks,
Denise D.

Re: Taping

john h on 7/02/01 at 17:26 (052084)

if your med bills exceed 3% of your gross income and you itemize, yes your can deduct the tape and most of the other remedies we try brian. i have only taped my feet twice. professional athletes tape various body parts for nearly every game they play and with baseball and basketball that is almost daily. what do they do?

Re: Taping

john h on 7/02/01 at 17:27 (052085)

i just returned from the club where i regularly put my feet under the hot jets of the whirlpool . have done this for years. at home i use ice packs after activity.

Re: Taping

Nancy N on 7/02/01 at 18:06 (052088)

15 minutes with my feet in the whirlpool was always the first thing I did in PT.

Re: Taping/Spray

Donna M on 7/02/01 at 23:30 (052104)

John H, there is a spray to put on your foot to help the tape stick and it is costly. When I went to therapy they told me about it, but they also told me a cheap brand of hair spray would work just as well. As for protecting the skin, hmmm, that's a good question!!

Re: Ultrasound & the Chiropractor-MORE QUESTIONS

Denise D. on 7/02/01 at 23:33 (052105)

Thanks again to all of you who answered my post, and gave great suggestions.
I'm still wondering about this ultra sound treatment. Thanks John for letting me know that you use heat treatment on your feet, the more I think about it, it does make sense, and would be soothing. I talked to my husband and he suggested that I go ahead and try it, so I called a Chiropractor that is on our health plan, he answered the phone which really surprised me, (I'm wondering why he doesn't have a receptionist). He said he could see me anytime, which again surprised me (If he was good he would be real busy). He really sounded concerned and like he wanted to help, he also told me that he has treated heelspurs with ultrasound in the past and had good results. One thing he told me that I don't agree with is, he said the ultrasound could help dissolve the spurs. If I'm thinking right, they never go away.
My question remains, if ultrasound is helpful in the fight against foot pain, then why don't I read more about it on this website??????
While I'm thinking about it, I've got another question? My cousin said she had heel pain and to solve her problem she began wearing good support shoes that had a slight heel, the height in the heel throws the weight of the foot forward, therefore relieving the pressure. Does that make sense to anyone??
I must sound like a fish out of water!!! I know I feel like one, not knowing which approach to take in this battle against my heel spur. I tried Vioxx but it made my ankles swell, and Celebrex didn't seem to do much for me, so I haven't been taking anything lately. I just want so much to be better before I have to go back to work in August.
I have noticed that my pain has lessened some these past few days, that's a good sign!!
Best of luck to you all,
Denise D.

Re: Taping

Julie on 7/03/01 at 02:22 (052110)

They earn enough so that thet barely notice the cost of all that tape.

Re: Taping

Julie on 7/03/01 at 02:28 (052112)

In my experience, if a good tape is used, and if it's applied and removed with care, and if it's removed nightly to allow the skin to breathe, there isn't any need for a special product to protect the skin. Of course everyone is different, but I think that in most people the skin on the soles of the feet is pretty tough, as it has to be.

If a person's sole-skin was sensitive and easily broken, I wouldn't suggest taping at all. A good quality elastic ankle/arch support instead.

Re: Ultrasound & the Chiropractor-MORE QUESTIONS

Julie on 7/03/01 at 02:53 (052113)

Hi Denise

Heat treatment - i.e. soaking the feet, applying heat packs, can aid circulation, but it's main purpose is relaxation and the easing of pain. Dr Z always says 'heat for pain, ice for inflammation'.

Ultrasound isn't 'heat treatment' per se, it's the application of ultrasonic (i.e. beyond the range of hearing) sound waves to the injured site. The theory is that in improving blood flow to the site, it kickstarts the healing process. In theory, and as part of a sound treatment package, it should help. Whether it does or not probably depends on the individual and on whatever else is being done to promote or obstruct healing. For instance: if you had ultrasound but didn't understand the need for rest and persevered with running, or a standing job, the ultrasound wouldn't have much of a chance to work. Or if you kept wearing poor shoes, or too-small shoes...etc.

There was quite a bit of discussion here about ultrasound several months ago. Have you used the search facility?

As for 'dissolving spurs', I seriously doubt that ultrasound could dissolve a spur, but that's not how I understand ultrasound works. In any case, it's irrelevant. The spur is rarely the cause of the pain, it is usually the body's attempt to heal the injury, so it's is arguably there for a useful purpose.

Your cousin's advice is good. A good trainer (sneaker) with a slightly raised heel might suit you. And it's so important to wear the right size shoes! Our feet tend to spread and grow as we age - I now wear shoes two sizes bigger than I did in my 20s. So we shouldn't assume that our shoe size stays the same, though it's easy to do.

What's important for most people is good arch support. I can't remember if you said anything about orthotics? Have you been evaluated by a podiatrist to see if you need them to correct any biomechanical fault? (Forgive me if I've forgotten something you've already told us.)

What is your job? (Forgive me if you've told us!)

Finally - it certainly wouldn't hurt to see a chiropractor or an osteopath to get your back checked out. Heel pain is often a knock-on effect of something going on in the lower back. Several people here have had chiropractic treatment - I regularly see an osteopath (somewhat more common in the UK than in the States).

I hope all this is useful. I'm glad your pain is lessening and hope the improvement continues.

Re: Taping/Spray

Julie on 7/03/01 at 03:14 (052118)

A good quality tape should stick without a spray to help, as long as the skin is clean.

Re: Taping

john h on 7/03/01 at 10:01 (052130)

let me see now, if AROD earns $24 million a year in base salary and another $10 million in endorsements then the percentage of his salary devoted to tape would be cost of tape $500 divided by his income of $34,000,000.00 = .00001470588.(.001470588%) i guess he can live with that.

Re: Ultrasound & the Chiropractor-MORE QUESTIONS

john h on 7/03/01 at 10:15 (052132)

baseball pitchers always ice their throwing arm down for 30 minutes or so after each game they pitch. during the game they wrap their arm up in a warm towell or put on a jacket to keep arm warm. The old standard for most sports injuries is ice for the first 24-48 (to keep down swelling) hours and then heat thereafter to reduce swelling. RICE (Rest,Ice,Compression,Elevation) i think that is the commonly used formula (hope i got that RICE correct)

Re: Sound Waves & the Chiropractor

Bill E. on 7/09/01 at hrmin (052570)

Everyone has their own stories (positive and negative) about PF treatment. I think that this disease or injury is highly individualized in the sense that heel pain may come from a set of different root causes and that different physiologies may respond differently to the different treatments.

My experience with ultrasound was excellent. My primary care physician sort of suggested it with some prompting from me. She gave me a prescription for physical therapy ultrasound treatment. My physical therapist was excellent. My treatment was a cortisone cream with ultrasound. My understanding is that the ultrasound improves circulation and that cortisone decreases swelling. I was concerned with the cortisone treatment but was assured by my physical therapist and by reading on the web that the topical treatment is not the hazard that the injections may be. I also understood (from my therapist) that the ultrasound helps to move the cortisone into the tissue. My treatments were: heat pads on the bottom of my feet for about 20 minutes to warm everything, application of cortisone cream and then ultrasound, then a foot massage. I started with three times per week and went down to two. I had therapy for several months though towards the end my feet were almost completely healed. It really worked!! The cortisone/ultrasound seemed to make the PF pain go down dramatically and the foot massage was theraputic and wonderfully relaxing.

So, I highly recommend this treatment. And you might be able to do it through your primary care physician and a physical therapy clinic as I did. The ancillary advantage for me of the physical therapy clinic was a lot of discussion of stretching and other things that I might do.

Bill

Re: Sound Waves & the Chiropractor

john h on 7/02/01 at 08:25 (052040)

From someone who has had foot surgery (release & tts) and ESWT i strongly suggest you try everything before surgery. There are a lot of successful surgery stories but there are a lot of post where the patients are worse. Do not let the doctor push you into surgery.

Re: Re:Taping

Julie on 7/02/01 at 08:50 (052043)

Denise, maybe I can help you regarding taping. Although I need it less and less these days, during the months I did need it I found it a godsend.

To answer your question,the tape does need to be fairly tight when standing. Not too tight, but tight enough so that you can feel it. It's the tension in the tape that provides the support for the fascia. If the tape is just stuck onto the sole of the foot without tension, it won't be effective. On the other hand, if it is too tight, it pulls too hard and you know it!

I've always used the two-strip method, and have found it almost as supportive as the more complicated, more expensive methods. Holding my foot in neutral, i.e. neither plantar-flexed nor dorsiflexed, I start each strip at ball of the foot and pull it fairly tightly along the arch, till it curves a little around the heel. I overlap them slightly. I have found this gives the right tension for me. When I tried it with the foot dorsiflexed (bent back at the ankle) the tape was much too tight when I stood up, and I had to remove it instantly.

Scott does point out that you need to experiment to get the tension right for your foot. You'll know whether or not it's right by how it feels when you walk around a bit.

Other points to note are:

You need a good quality tape that will hold its tension once applied.

The tape should be removed at night so that the skin can recover. The skin softens and weakens if the tape is left on, especially if the tape gets wet. Don't be tempted to leave it on overnight and on into the next day. (This is one of the reasons I prefer the two-strip technique to the full wrap: the latter is usually left on for several days, which I think is bad news for the skin.)

The sticky residue can be removed with cotton and lighter fluid.

As the simple technique I've described worked for me, I wasn't motivated to try any of the others, but they would be worth experimenting with till you find one that works for you. Judy likes the 'figure 8' method, I know.

I don't think you need to fear doing yourself harm with tape. It will either help or it won't. It's certainly worth persevering, in my view.

Ultrasound is not the same as ESWT, although it does work on much the same principle. In introducing sound waves to the injured site, it kickstarts the healing process by stimulating blood flow. I had several treatments, and am glad I did, though it isn't possible to say whether it helped as I was doing lots of other things as well: taping, resting, icing, wearing Birkenstocks, orthotics with good trainers. The bottom line is that I have got better. Any or all of these conservative treatments - plus time - have worked. I'm now using Jade Balm in the hope that it will get rid of the last lingering vestiges (down to very mile discomfort when I really overdo things).

One last thought, having just re-read your post: if your pod seems to be pushing you towards surgery, and isn't giving you much help otherwise, try to find another. And most certainly, as John advised, consider ESWT before surgery even if, after trying everything for at least six months, nothing has helped. But I hope that won't be the case.

Enjoy your month off.

Re: Re:Taping

Julie on 7/02/01 at 08:53 (052045)

Sorry for the duplication. I got an error message saying 'your request couldn't be completed' the first time I posted the above, so tried again, and both have come through.

'M ild' not 'mile' discomfort.

Re: Taping

BrianG on 7/02/01 at 09:37 (052056)

Hi Denise,

I use the 2 strips of tape method quite a bit. I start right behind the toes and bring the tape all the way to at least an inch or two up the heel. Make sure your foot is not tensed up when your putting the tape on. I use two types of tape. One is brown and waterproof. It has a little give, so I stretch it out while putting it on. The other is a white sports tape and I put it on so that it's firm, but I really don't stretch it out. I then put my socks and shoes on, before my foot touches the ground. You should feel some tension if you've put it on correctly. If it's too tight, you'll know it, and will have to take it off.

It shouldn't take to long to get a good feel for it, and it should help. I know it's been a help for me. When taking it off, start up near the toes, and slowly peel it back. I once got an OUCH by starting at the heel and ripping it up towards the toes. Took off some skin !!! Good luck, don't give up on it.

BCG

Re: Taping

Julie on 7/02/01 at 09:58 (052059)

Brian, and Denise, the reference to taking off the skin reminds me. It happened once to me - if it does, you can still carry on taping as long as you put a small bandaid over the bit where the skin is broken.

Re: Taping

john h on 7/02/01 at 10:51 (052064)

are there not some spray products that you can spray your foot with before taping that would protect the skin?

Re: Taping

BrianG on 7/02/01 at 13:30 (052072)

Oh, right John. That will only be an additional $5.95 per week :*)
My Pod used it last time she taped me. I would imagine thats why it was $150 for a 15 minute office visit !!! When does it all stop?

BCG

PS I don't suppose we can write any of this stuff off on out taxes, can we?

Re: Taping

Denise D. on 7/02/01 at 15:23 (052080)

Thanks to you all for answering my taping questions.
I'm about to try the two strip method after I post this message.
I still have questions about soundwave treatment.
I'm so confused----some say never, never, never use heat on your feet, while others say its ok. (no rhyme intended!!!Ha!) So has anyone used this method? And if so what are the results? I understand that in order to heal it must rest, and the heat seems like it would provide good blood flow which would help the healing process. In the few months that I've been using this website, I haven't read much at all about deep heat treatment, that's why I want to learn more about it. Any info regarding this type of treatment would really be appreciated. Also, has anyone used a chiropractor for the treatment of heelspurs??
Thanks to you all,
Denise D.

Re: To John Re: Sound Waves & the Chiropractor

Denise D. on 7/02/01 at 15:26 (052081)

Hi John,
Thanks for the advise. I really don't want surgery and am leaning more towards alternative methods.
What experience did you have with the ESWT. That is something I have considered.
Thanks,
Denise D.

Re: Taping

john h on 7/02/01 at 17:26 (052084)

if your med bills exceed 3% of your gross income and you itemize, yes your can deduct the tape and most of the other remedies we try brian. i have only taped my feet twice. professional athletes tape various body parts for nearly every game they play and with baseball and basketball that is almost daily. what do they do?

Re: Taping

john h on 7/02/01 at 17:27 (052085)

i just returned from the club where i regularly put my feet under the hot jets of the whirlpool . have done this for years. at home i use ice packs after activity.

Re: Taping

Nancy N on 7/02/01 at 18:06 (052088)

15 minutes with my feet in the whirlpool was always the first thing I did in PT.

Re: Taping/Spray

Donna M on 7/02/01 at 23:30 (052104)

John H, there is a spray to put on your foot to help the tape stick and it is costly. When I went to therapy they told me about it, but they also told me a cheap brand of hair spray would work just as well. As for protecting the skin, hmmm, that's a good question!!

Re: Ultrasound & the Chiropractor-MORE QUESTIONS

Denise D. on 7/02/01 at 23:33 (052105)

Thanks again to all of you who answered my post, and gave great suggestions.
I'm still wondering about this ultra sound treatment. Thanks John for letting me know that you use heat treatment on your feet, the more I think about it, it does make sense, and would be soothing. I talked to my husband and he suggested that I go ahead and try it, so I called a Chiropractor that is on our health plan, he answered the phone which really surprised me, (I'm wondering why he doesn't have a receptionist). He said he could see me anytime, which again surprised me (If he was good he would be real busy). He really sounded concerned and like he wanted to help, he also told me that he has treated heelspurs with ultrasound in the past and had good results. One thing he told me that I don't agree with is, he said the ultrasound could help dissolve the spurs. If I'm thinking right, they never go away.
My question remains, if ultrasound is helpful in the fight against foot pain, then why don't I read more about it on this website??????
While I'm thinking about it, I've got another question? My cousin said she had heel pain and to solve her problem she began wearing good support shoes that had a slight heel, the height in the heel throws the weight of the foot forward, therefore relieving the pressure. Does that make sense to anyone??
I must sound like a fish out of water!!! I know I feel like one, not knowing which approach to take in this battle against my heel spur. I tried Vioxx but it made my ankles swell, and Celebrex didn't seem to do much for me, so I haven't been taking anything lately. I just want so much to be better before I have to go back to work in August.
I have noticed that my pain has lessened some these past few days, that's a good sign!!
Best of luck to you all,
Denise D.

Re: Taping

Julie on 7/03/01 at 02:22 (052110)

They earn enough so that thet barely notice the cost of all that tape.

Re: Taping

Julie on 7/03/01 at 02:28 (052112)

In my experience, if a good tape is used, and if it's applied and removed with care, and if it's removed nightly to allow the skin to breathe, there isn't any need for a special product to protect the skin. Of course everyone is different, but I think that in most people the skin on the soles of the feet is pretty tough, as it has to be.

If a person's sole-skin was sensitive and easily broken, I wouldn't suggest taping at all. A good quality elastic ankle/arch support instead.

Re: Ultrasound & the Chiropractor-MORE QUESTIONS

Julie on 7/03/01 at 02:53 (052113)

Hi Denise

Heat treatment - i.e. soaking the feet, applying heat packs, can aid circulation, but it's main purpose is relaxation and the easing of pain. Dr Z always says 'heat for pain, ice for inflammation'.

Ultrasound isn't 'heat treatment' per se, it's the application of ultrasonic (i.e. beyond the range of hearing) sound waves to the injured site. The theory is that in improving blood flow to the site, it kickstarts the healing process. In theory, and as part of a sound treatment package, it should help. Whether it does or not probably depends on the individual and on whatever else is being done to promote or obstruct healing. For instance: if you had ultrasound but didn't understand the need for rest and persevered with running, or a standing job, the ultrasound wouldn't have much of a chance to work. Or if you kept wearing poor shoes, or too-small shoes...etc.

There was quite a bit of discussion here about ultrasound several months ago. Have you used the search facility?

As for 'dissolving spurs', I seriously doubt that ultrasound could dissolve a spur, but that's not how I understand ultrasound works. In any case, it's irrelevant. The spur is rarely the cause of the pain, it is usually the body's attempt to heal the injury, so it's is arguably there for a useful purpose.

Your cousin's advice is good. A good trainer (sneaker) with a slightly raised heel might suit you. And it's so important to wear the right size shoes! Our feet tend to spread and grow as we age - I now wear shoes two sizes bigger than I did in my 20s. So we shouldn't assume that our shoe size stays the same, though it's easy to do.

What's important for most people is good arch support. I can't remember if you said anything about orthotics? Have you been evaluated by a podiatrist to see if you need them to correct any biomechanical fault? (Forgive me if I've forgotten something you've already told us.)

What is your job? (Forgive me if you've told us!)

Finally - it certainly wouldn't hurt to see a chiropractor or an osteopath to get your back checked out. Heel pain is often a knock-on effect of something going on in the lower back. Several people here have had chiropractic treatment - I regularly see an osteopath (somewhat more common in the UK than in the States).

I hope all this is useful. I'm glad your pain is lessening and hope the improvement continues.

Re: Taping/Spray

Julie on 7/03/01 at 03:14 (052118)

A good quality tape should stick without a spray to help, as long as the skin is clean.

Re: Taping

john h on 7/03/01 at 10:01 (052130)

let me see now, if AROD earns $24 million a year in base salary and another $10 million in endorsements then the percentage of his salary devoted to tape would be cost of tape $500 divided by his income of $34,000,000.00 = .00001470588.(.001470588%) i guess he can live with that.

Re: Ultrasound & the Chiropractor-MORE QUESTIONS

john h on 7/03/01 at 10:15 (052132)

baseball pitchers always ice their throwing arm down for 30 minutes or so after each game they pitch. during the game they wrap their arm up in a warm towell or put on a jacket to keep arm warm. The old standard for most sports injuries is ice for the first 24-48 (to keep down swelling) hours and then heat thereafter to reduce swelling. RICE (Rest,Ice,Compression,Elevation) i think that is the commonly used formula (hope i got that RICE correct)

Re: Sound Waves & the Chiropractor

Bill E. on 7/09/01 at hrmin (052570)

Everyone has their own stories (positive and negative) about PF treatment. I think that this disease or injury is highly individualized in the sense that heel pain may come from a set of different root causes and that different physiologies may respond differently to the different treatments.

My experience with ultrasound was excellent. My primary care physician sort of suggested it with some prompting from me. She gave me a prescription for physical therapy ultrasound treatment. My physical therapist was excellent. My treatment was a cortisone cream with ultrasound. My understanding is that the ultrasound improves circulation and that cortisone decreases swelling. I was concerned with the cortisone treatment but was assured by my physical therapist and by reading on the web that the topical treatment is not the hazard that the injections may be. I also understood (from my therapist) that the ultrasound helps to move the cortisone into the tissue. My treatments were: heat pads on the bottom of my feet for about 20 minutes to warm everything, application of cortisone cream and then ultrasound, then a foot massage. I started with three times per week and went down to two. I had therapy for several months though towards the end my feet were almost completely healed. It really worked!! The cortisone/ultrasound seemed to make the PF pain go down dramatically and the foot massage was theraputic and wonderfully relaxing.

So, I highly recommend this treatment. And you might be able to do it through your primary care physician and a physical therapy clinic as I did. The ancillary advantage for me of the physical therapy clinic was a lot of discussion of stretching and other things that I might do.

Bill