Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

I have PF. Now what?

Posted by Debbye T. on 7/04/01 at 10:15 (052194)

Hi, Everyone --

Just discovered this site an hour ago. I've been having awful heel pain for the past 2 months and had no idea what was wrong. I decided to look online for some input and voila! It's PF. What does this mean, though? Do I stay off my feet forever? I have 3 kids, I'm 46 years old and live in Palm Beach County, FL. I checked the numerous products available for relief, etc., but which one(s) do you all think I should begin with first?

I'll be contacting a podiatrist right away, too. Meanwhile, do you just learn to live with the pain? I love to walk and be outdoors, but are those days over?

Thanks so much for any advice you can offer. You seem like a great bunch of people.

Re: I have PF. Now what?

Julie on 7/04/01 at 11:13 (052206)

Hello Debbys - welcome to heelspurs.com. Yes, this is a great bunch of people and a wonderful website. You're lucky to have stumbled on it so quickly.

There are several message boards. It's worth your while famliarizing yourself with them and posting questions on the relevant ones, as not everyone reads all the boards.

You will find the heel pain book a great help: it gives a lot of information about pf and ideas about treatment. Best thing is to print it out and read and re-read it at leisure.

Do get yourself to a podiatrist quickly. If you're lucky and find a good one, s/he will (or should) do a full examination and a biomechanical evaluation which will determine if there are any faults in your gait, such as over-pronation, which could be corrected by orthotics. Again, if s/he's good, you'll get help with a variety of conservative treatments, and there won't be any mention of steroid injections or surgery except as a possible last resort.

Conservative treatments include taping, to rest the fascia and support the arch, icing to reduce inflammation, anti-inflammatory drugs ditto and to relieve pain, and stretching (though almost all pods recommend weight-bearing stretches which some of us, including myself, do not consider appropriate for pf . Above all - rest. That means not putting your feet up forever, but staying off them for now as much as you can. You do need exercise, so if you get yours by walking a lot, you need to think about alternatives. Swimming is excellent, yoga as long as not too many standing postures are done, and lots of folk here swear by biking ('real' and stationary).

Footgear is very important. Your arches need support at all times, so don't ever go barefoot. Many of us, but not all of us, like Birkenstock sandals it's a very individual matter (like pretty welleverything to do with pf). Good quality sneakers with a slightly raised heel should be looked into (completely flat shoes are not good).

Once you've started to inform yourself and get a handle on the whole thing, you'll be able to ask questions and you'll find that you get a lot of information and support from people here.

Be optimistic. You've found out what's (probably) the matter early, you've been sensible in looking for information, and with the help of a good foot specialist and this website you'll soon be on your way to recovery. Be patient, though: it does take time. But as long as you get a good treatment strategy in place, and stick to it, you can look forward to walking and all the other things you love again.

All the best, Julie

Once you

Re: I have PF. Now what?

Steve P on 7/04/01 at 20:05 (052242)

Debbye --- Good advice from Julie, as usual! The key is to see a good doc as soon as possible & stay off your feet in the meantime as much as you can.

The odds are with you. 90%+ of all PF cases are successfully resolved by conservative treatments. It can take a while & requires discipline, but your odds are excellent.

best...........Steve

Re: I have PF. Now what?

Donna M on 7/05/01 at 00:06 (052256)

Hi Debbye and welcome aboard! You just got good advice and answers from 2 of the nicest and most helpful people at heelspurs.com! Hope you get over the pain fast and get back to normal!

Take care,

Donna M

Re: I have PF. Now what?

Julie on 7/04/01 at 11:13 (052206)

Hello Debbys - welcome to heelspurs.com. Yes, this is a great bunch of people and a wonderful website. You're lucky to have stumbled on it so quickly.

There are several message boards. It's worth your while famliarizing yourself with them and posting questions on the relevant ones, as not everyone reads all the boards.

You will find the heel pain book a great help: it gives a lot of information about pf and ideas about treatment. Best thing is to print it out and read and re-read it at leisure.

Do get yourself to a podiatrist quickly. If you're lucky and find a good one, s/he will (or should) do a full examination and a biomechanical evaluation which will determine if there are any faults in your gait, such as over-pronation, which could be corrected by orthotics. Again, if s/he's good, you'll get help with a variety of conservative treatments, and there won't be any mention of steroid injections or surgery except as a possible last resort.

Conservative treatments include taping, to rest the fascia and support the arch, icing to reduce inflammation, anti-inflammatory drugs ditto and to relieve pain, and stretching (though almost all pods recommend weight-bearing stretches which some of us, including myself, do not consider appropriate for pf . Above all - rest. That means not putting your feet up forever, but staying off them for now as much as you can. You do need exercise, so if you get yours by walking a lot, you need to think about alternatives. Swimming is excellent, yoga as long as not too many standing postures are done, and lots of folk here swear by biking ('real' and stationary).

Footgear is very important. Your arches need support at all times, so don't ever go barefoot. Many of us, but not all of us, like Birkenstock sandals it's a very individual matter (like pretty welleverything to do with pf). Good quality sneakers with a slightly raised heel should be looked into (completely flat shoes are not good).

Once you've started to inform yourself and get a handle on the whole thing, you'll be able to ask questions and you'll find that you get a lot of information and support from people here.

Be optimistic. You've found out what's (probably) the matter early, you've been sensible in looking for information, and with the help of a good foot specialist and this website you'll soon be on your way to recovery. Be patient, though: it does take time. But as long as you get a good treatment strategy in place, and stick to it, you can look forward to walking and all the other things you love again.

All the best, Julie

Once you

Re: I have PF. Now what?

Steve P on 7/04/01 at 20:05 (052242)

Debbye --- Good advice from Julie, as usual! The key is to see a good doc as soon as possible & stay off your feet in the meantime as much as you can.

The odds are with you. 90%+ of all PF cases are successfully resolved by conservative treatments. It can take a while & requires discipline, but your odds are excellent.

best...........Steve

Re: I have PF. Now what?

Donna M on 7/05/01 at 00:06 (052256)

Hi Debbye and welcome aboard! You just got good advice and answers from 2 of the nicest and most helpful people at heelspurs.com! Hope you get over the pain fast and get back to normal!

Take care,

Donna M