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What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

Posted by elliott on 7/11/01 at 13:26 (052828)

Sure, we're a biased sample and the interpretation unclear: we're here because we have problems; defining success can be tricky as well; what caused the TTS is certainly relevant; it's not always the surgeon's fault. Nevertheless, I'm sure many of you are now suspicious of the stated success rates, and it might be interesting to hear the probabilities your surgeon gave you and a brief description of the outcome. Below are mine and I'd love to hear yours.

My TTS problems were running-induced.

My first surgeon (right foot) gave me 90-95% chance of success. (Hate when they give a range instead of a number; it just doesn't make sense to me.) Surgery got rid of some numbness and burning which anyway was really bad only after exercise I still can't do, but it also gave me weakness, scar tissue and many other problems. It's two years now, and if it doesn't get any better, I will have regretted the surgery or at least having used him.

My second surgeon (left foot) gave me 75% chance of success. Lowered my tingling pain to a much more tolerable level but I now can't wear any shoes; if I do it's even worse than before surgery. He is one of the best TTS surgeons in the country, so I can't say I regret having selecting him, and he did lower my pain level, but I wish I could put on my shoes.

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

wendyn on 7/11/01 at 13:33 (052832)

My surgeon told me < than 50/50 chance of sucess.

The stats I've read range anywhere from 50% to 90% but with the most common belief being somewhere around the 60 to 75% range.

Success rates appear to be much higher if there is an identifiable mass sitting in the tunnel that can be removed. Short of that, it's hard to say.

In my case - the belief is that a lot of my pain is from the nerve being stretched...going in and opening the tunnel up could very likely just make that type of problem worse.

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

cindyp on 7/11/01 at hrmin (052833)

Mine didn't give specific numbers but emphasized that this surgery was absolutely necessary. I have the occasional electric shock. The swelling is almost gone, Can wear birkenstock sandals but not walking around too much. All in all feel okay. I do have a long scar but I am careful.

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

eileenc on 7/12/01 at 07:27 (052922)

The orthopedic surgeon I saw said 50/50. My podiatric surgeon said over 90%, but he only cut a 1- inch incision just under my ankle. He was most upset when the surgery was a failure. Make sure that your surgeon knows to do the 'release' above and below the band of muscle that holds everything in under your ankle.

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

Lori R on 7/12/01 at 15:19 (052968)

Elliott,

I'm wondering what part of the country you live in and who your surgeon is, as the ortho I was going to is suppose to be one of the top tts surgeons if not the top one. (I am the one who also posted about the relationship between tts and carpal tunnel.) You can respond to me at joelorirayne@aol.com

Thanks,
Lori

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

Jeff on 7/14/01 at hrmin (053164)

Eileen, You've just mentioned the number one reason why many tarsal tunnel releases fail. There are actually 4 areas to release when performing tarsal tunnel surgery. If the lacinate ligament is the only release, you're going to have a bad outcome. More info on TTS at http://www.myfootshop.com .
Jeff

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

AnnaG on 7/16/01 at 13:47 (053364)

Dear Elliott: I am pleased that you had the courage to post your message but am deeply distressed that you have had such horrible experiences. Though I have not yet been diagnosed with tts, I have the classic symptoms. I, too, used to be a runner. I turn 50 in the fall but it doesn't mean that much to me to enter a new age group. Without running, I have very little to look forward to. Have you returned to running at all?

Re: sorry you might be joining the club

elliott on 7/16/01 at 15:48 (053378)

Others don't understand about how much running means to us. The feel-good of that daily run. Working on improving one's times. Running was the only thing in the world I really liked doing, and now it's been taken away from me. And its surgical aftermath may have left me with serious problems for the rest of my life. I'm not even sure I can risk it if I do recover (we'll see what I do if and when I have that choice).

My last run was October 10; stopped in the middle and barely made it back. Turned 40 three days earlier. Even if I got totally better today, my PR dreams have been permanently crushed. And I'm nowhere close to trying again and have strong doubts I ever will. Something went wrong big time with the surgery on my first foot, so much so that I hope I won't have trouble walking in the future. Surgery on second foot prevents me from wearing most shoes. But as with everything, there's hope. First foot is certainly better than it was 2 months ago, so maybe if I rest it for a very very long time (years?), it will get better. Maybe my second foot will come around (it's almost a year now since surgery); I'm considering getting what I hope would be a lucky cortisone shot.

But no running now, if ever. I just hate swimmming, hate it, so it is rare that I do that. Surprisingly, at least right now I am able to bike every other day (somehow easier than walking), so that's something. So if able to ride, you may want to consider getting a nice road bike and giving that a try. There's a lot of formerly injured ex-runners in this sport. No, it's not running, but then, nothing else is.

It sounds too early for you to think it's all over. Not sure what you mean by classic TTS symptoms as in your other post; an entire foot going numb is not classic TTS, which is exhibited by nervy pain at medial ankle possibly radiating up calf and possibly extending along one or more of the nerve branches to heel or toes. Maybe things will work themselves out.

If it turns out you can't run again, I'm not going to tell you to just forget about it, because you and I know it doesn't work that way. I'm going to tell you to have a good cry or two or 1000, remember that I and others are thinking of you, and try your best to cope and get over the depression. I asked a co-worker whose injuries prevent him from ever running again how long it took him to get over it. He nonchalantly answered, 'Oh, about 3 years, with occasional relapses which get easier and easier to deal with as time goes on.' Hope you're not there, but if you are, hope you view my words as wise and not cruel.

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

wendyn on 7/11/01 at 13:33 (052832)

My surgeon told me < than 50/50 chance of sucess.

The stats I've read range anywhere from 50% to 90% but with the most common belief being somewhere around the 60 to 75% range.

Success rates appear to be much higher if there is an identifiable mass sitting in the tunnel that can be removed. Short of that, it's hard to say.

In my case - the belief is that a lot of my pain is from the nerve being stretched...going in and opening the tunnel up could very likely just make that type of problem worse.

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

cindyp on 7/11/01 at hrmin (052833)

Mine didn't give specific numbers but emphasized that this surgery was absolutely necessary. I have the occasional electric shock. The swelling is almost gone, Can wear birkenstock sandals but not walking around too much. All in all feel okay. I do have a long scar but I am careful.

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

eileenc on 7/12/01 at 07:27 (052922)

The orthopedic surgeon I saw said 50/50. My podiatric surgeon said over 90%, but he only cut a 1- inch incision just under my ankle. He was most upset when the surgery was a failure. Make sure that your surgeon knows to do the 'release' above and below the band of muscle that holds everything in under your ankle.

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

Lori R on 7/12/01 at 15:19 (052968)

Elliott,

I'm wondering what part of the country you live in and who your surgeon is, as the ortho I was going to is suppose to be one of the top tts surgeons if not the top one. (I am the one who also posted about the relationship between tts and carpal tunnel.) You can respond to me at joelorirayne@aol.com

Thanks,
Lori

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

Jeff on 7/14/01 at hrmin (053164)

Eileen, You've just mentioned the number one reason why many tarsal tunnel releases fail. There are actually 4 areas to release when performing tarsal tunnel surgery. If the lacinate ligament is the only release, you're going to have a bad outcome. More info on TTS at http://www.myfootshop.com .
Jeff

Re: What probability of success did your TTS surgeon give you?

AnnaG on 7/16/01 at 13:47 (053364)

Dear Elliott: I am pleased that you had the courage to post your message but am deeply distressed that you have had such horrible experiences. Though I have not yet been diagnosed with tts, I have the classic symptoms. I, too, used to be a runner. I turn 50 in the fall but it doesn't mean that much to me to enter a new age group. Without running, I have very little to look forward to. Have you returned to running at all?

Re: sorry you might be joining the club

elliott on 7/16/01 at 15:48 (053378)

Others don't understand about how much running means to us. The feel-good of that daily run. Working on improving one's times. Running was the only thing in the world I really liked doing, and now it's been taken away from me. And its surgical aftermath may have left me with serious problems for the rest of my life. I'm not even sure I can risk it if I do recover (we'll see what I do if and when I have that choice).

My last run was October 10; stopped in the middle and barely made it back. Turned 40 three days earlier. Even if I got totally better today, my PR dreams have been permanently crushed. And I'm nowhere close to trying again and have strong doubts I ever will. Something went wrong big time with the surgery on my first foot, so much so that I hope I won't have trouble walking in the future. Surgery on second foot prevents me from wearing most shoes. But as with everything, there's hope. First foot is certainly better than it was 2 months ago, so maybe if I rest it for a very very long time (years?), it will get better. Maybe my second foot will come around (it's almost a year now since surgery); I'm considering getting what I hope would be a lucky cortisone shot.

But no running now, if ever. I just hate swimmming, hate it, so it is rare that I do that. Surprisingly, at least right now I am able to bike every other day (somehow easier than walking), so that's something. So if able to ride, you may want to consider getting a nice road bike and giving that a try. There's a lot of formerly injured ex-runners in this sport. No, it's not running, but then, nothing else is.

It sounds too early for you to think it's all over. Not sure what you mean by classic TTS symptoms as in your other post; an entire foot going numb is not classic TTS, which is exhibited by nervy pain at medial ankle possibly radiating up calf and possibly extending along one or more of the nerve branches to heel or toes. Maybe things will work themselves out.

If it turns out you can't run again, I'm not going to tell you to just forget about it, because you and I know it doesn't work that way. I'm going to tell you to have a good cry or two or 1000, remember that I and others are thinking of you, and try your best to cope and get over the depression. I asked a co-worker whose injuries prevent him from ever running again how long it took him to get over it. He nonchalantly answered, 'Oh, about 3 years, with occasional relapses which get easier and easier to deal with as time goes on.' Hope you're not there, but if you are, hope you view my words as wise and not cruel.