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non weight bearing exercises

Posted by Pam on 7/15/01 at 20:11 (053291)

Can someone give me some examples of what a non-weight bearing exercise might be? I have started doing stretches, but afterwards my foot/calf area always seem more aggrevated than before. I believe the non-weight bearing is maybe what I need. I have been reading where othe pf sufferers are having success with this type of stretch, but I not aware of what that is exactly! Thanks.

Re: non weight bearing exercises

Dr. Zuckerman on 7/15/01 at 21:28 (053298)

Hi,

Take a look at the excercises that go with the Personal Foot Trainers. This can be found on the product page.

Re: non weight bearing exercises

wendyn on 7/15/01 at 22:35 (053301)

Julie is the stretching guru...I'm sure she can help us out....

Try laying on the floor with your butt up near the wall. Swing your legs up so you are laying on your back, with your bum as close to the wall as you are comfortable - straighten your legs if you can (gently!) if you are comfy, pull your toes back towards your body so they form a 90 degree angle with your legs. Lay there.

This is a yoga pose called 'legs up the wall'. When I started my legs were so tight I could not even flatten them to the wall - now I can flatten them comfortably and I'm working on pulling my toes down (gently!) and I am making progress. I have short heel cords and tight gastroc muscles....this pose is also very relaxing for your low back area.

Re: non weight bearing exercises

Julie on 7/16/01 at 02:45 (053317)

Pam, I described a series of exercises for the toes and ankles in a post to Rudy a few weeks ago. If you do a search on his name, you'll find it about half way down.

They are simple yoga exercises that work the feet gently: curling and spreading the toes (which works all the muscles of the feet), bending the ankles backwards and forwards (which works into the Achilles tendon and the calf muscles) and circling the feet at the ankles. But do look at my post to Rudy for the full description.

I've practised and taught these for many years, and have found them extra-good in the past year of working on my pf. You can do them lying down or sitting in a chair. I would suggest that you do them as many times a day as you think of it - but make a point of doing them before you get out of bed in the morning as they can help you avoid the first-step pain.

If the weight-bearing stretches you are doing are painful, you'd be wise to stop doing them. Pain is a message from your body to stop doing whatever is causing the pain - that is always true, but especially true when youj are trying to heal an injury, which is what pf is.

So do read that post and don't hesitate to ask questions.

Re: Yoga exercises for the feet - here are the details

Julie on 7/16/01 at 03:13 (053323)

Hi Pam

On second thoughts, I thought I would find that post and copy it here so that you, and anyone else who might be interested, can see it.

Curl your toes forward, as if making fist of your feet. Then draw them back towards you, stretching and spreading them. Try to make space between each toe and its neighbour. Don't move the ankles, just the toes. Breathe out as you curl the toes, in as you stretch them. 9 times.

Bend your feet forward at the ankles, pointing the toes away. Then bend them back. Make this 'hingeing' movement as full as you can, without causing pain. Breathe out as you bend the feet forward, in as you bend them back. 9 times.

Circle your feet at the ankles, first one at a time, then together. Pretend you're drawing circles with your big toe and make the circles as big as you can. Breathe naturally as you do this one. 9 times with each ankle, 9 times with both.

These three movements are part of a group of simple yoga exercises for the joints called Pawanmuktasana. I've practised and taught them for many years, and they have general beneficial effects on body and mind, apart from the specific ones on the feet. Since I've been working on healing my PF, I've given more time to them, and they have been an important and effective element of my treatment strategy.

My podiatrist recommended the wall stretches. I'd known them for a long time, and they are certainly effective stretches for the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles if done correctly (a big 'if' in my experience) but I doubt their suitability for people with PF. I think they can easily irritate the achilles tendon, and pull on the 'weak' point of the plantar fascia, where it has begun to tear away from the calcaneus. I did them for awhile, but they hurt, and I felt they were making things worse, so I stopped. I know that not everyone agree with me, but it is my view of the matter and it's a fairly educated view.

I hope you'll find this helpful.For a concise explanation of why the generally recommended weight-bearing stretches for PF are not appropriate, see Mike Wilmot's web page: http://www.foottrainer.com . I've ordered and just received a pair of Mike's Personal Foot Trainers, and I think the theory makes sense, but it's too early for a report. I know Dr Zuckerman thinks highly of them and recommends them to his patients.

Pam, I do hope you'll find these helpful. Let us know how you get on.

All the best, Julie

Re: Yoga exercises for the feet - here are the details

Pam on 7/16/01 at 20:29 (053406)

Thanks for all the info. I will give it a try and let you know how it is working.

Re: non weight bearing exercises

Dr. Zuckerman on 7/15/01 at 21:28 (053298)

Hi,

Take a look at the excercises that go with the Personal Foot Trainers. This can be found on the product page.

Re: non weight bearing exercises

wendyn on 7/15/01 at 22:35 (053301)

Julie is the stretching guru...I'm sure she can help us out....

Try laying on the floor with your butt up near the wall. Swing your legs up so you are laying on your back, with your bum as close to the wall as you are comfortable - straighten your legs if you can (gently!) if you are comfy, pull your toes back towards your body so they form a 90 degree angle with your legs. Lay there.

This is a yoga pose called 'legs up the wall'. When I started my legs were so tight I could not even flatten them to the wall - now I can flatten them comfortably and I'm working on pulling my toes down (gently!) and I am making progress. I have short heel cords and tight gastroc muscles....this pose is also very relaxing for your low back area.

Re: non weight bearing exercises

Julie on 7/16/01 at 02:45 (053317)

Pam, I described a series of exercises for the toes and ankles in a post to Rudy a few weeks ago. If you do a search on his name, you'll find it about half way down.

They are simple yoga exercises that work the feet gently: curling and spreading the toes (which works all the muscles of the feet), bending the ankles backwards and forwards (which works into the Achilles tendon and the calf muscles) and circling the feet at the ankles. But do look at my post to Rudy for the full description.

I've practised and taught these for many years, and have found them extra-good in the past year of working on my pf. You can do them lying down or sitting in a chair. I would suggest that you do them as many times a day as you think of it - but make a point of doing them before you get out of bed in the morning as they can help you avoid the first-step pain.

If the weight-bearing stretches you are doing are painful, you'd be wise to stop doing them. Pain is a message from your body to stop doing whatever is causing the pain - that is always true, but especially true when youj are trying to heal an injury, which is what pf is.

So do read that post and don't hesitate to ask questions.

Re: Yoga exercises for the feet - here are the details

Julie on 7/16/01 at 03:13 (053323)

Hi Pam

On second thoughts, I thought I would find that post and copy it here so that you, and anyone else who might be interested, can see it.

Curl your toes forward, as if making fist of your feet. Then draw them back towards you, stretching and spreading them. Try to make space between each toe and its neighbour. Don't move the ankles, just the toes. Breathe out as you curl the toes, in as you stretch them. 9 times.

Bend your feet forward at the ankles, pointing the toes away. Then bend them back. Make this 'hingeing' movement as full as you can, without causing pain. Breathe out as you bend the feet forward, in as you bend them back. 9 times.

Circle your feet at the ankles, first one at a time, then together. Pretend you're drawing circles with your big toe and make the circles as big as you can. Breathe naturally as you do this one. 9 times with each ankle, 9 times with both.

These three movements are part of a group of simple yoga exercises for the joints called Pawanmuktasana. I've practised and taught them for many years, and they have general beneficial effects on body and mind, apart from the specific ones on the feet. Since I've been working on healing my PF, I've given more time to them, and they have been an important and effective element of my treatment strategy.

My podiatrist recommended the wall stretches. I'd known them for a long time, and they are certainly effective stretches for the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles if done correctly (a big 'if' in my experience) but I doubt their suitability for people with PF. I think they can easily irritate the achilles tendon, and pull on the 'weak' point of the plantar fascia, where it has begun to tear away from the calcaneus. I did them for awhile, but they hurt, and I felt they were making things worse, so I stopped. I know that not everyone agree with me, but it is my view of the matter and it's a fairly educated view.

I hope you'll find this helpful.For a concise explanation of why the generally recommended weight-bearing stretches for PF are not appropriate, see Mike Wilmot's web page: http://www.foottrainer.com . I've ordered and just received a pair of Mike's Personal Foot Trainers, and I think the theory makes sense, but it's too early for a report. I know Dr Zuckerman thinks highly of them and recommends them to his patients.

Pam, I do hope you'll find these helpful. Let us know how you get on.

All the best, Julie

Re: Yoga exercises for the feet - here are the details

Pam on 7/16/01 at 20:29 (053406)

Thanks for all the info. I will give it a try and let you know how it is working.