Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Sleeping position

Posted by Dondi on 7/18/01 at hrmin (053618)

Hi-
Is there a right or wrong way to sleep with PF? I have been sleeping with my feet slightly hanging over the edge of the bed for a few months now, both on my back and on my stomach so that the sheets and blankets don't 'bend' my feet incorrectly. Now it feels like my ankles feel weird, like they are locked up. Thank you...

Re: Sleeping position

Dr. Marlene Reid on 7/18/01 at hrmin (053643)

It's funny you should ask this tonight. Last night, I was trying to sleep on my stomach and my PF started to hurt (I have had a flare up the past two weeks). I always forget to mention sleeping positions to my PF patients. Sleeping on your stomach causes the fascia to contract, or at least maintain its contracted position.

Re: Sleeping position

tammie on 7/19/01 at 00:58 (053659)

Oh my YOU have pf to? I guess it just surprised me to hear that ! How do you deal with it and your life? As you must have a busy life!LOL I dont know why I should be surprised but I was when I read this post! Take care, and hope you get some rest! So no tummy sleeping huh, well that is ok by me as my lovely darling foot does not want to sleep anyways lol! Wow I really am still in shock with your saying you have the blasted pf also, I bet that makes you a very good Dr. for treating your patients! As you would know what they are feeling! Good night and best wishes on your feet!

Re: Sleeping position

Julie on 7/19/01 at 02:53 (053670)

Dondi, I saw Dr Marlene's advice about not sleeping on your front and would like to add that sleeping with your feet hanging off the bed in any position, front, back or sides, will plantar flex the feet and contract the fascia, tendons and calves. To be avoided at all costs, I'd say.

If your ankles now feel weird, it could be because of this extra contraction. Ask your doctor if it might not be time to investigate and try a night splint. It holds the foot in a dorsiflexed position, which keeps the calf muscles slightly stretched out all night.

Re: Sleeping position

Dondi on 7/19/01 at hrmin (053723)

I am sorry to hear you too have PF. What would you suggest as the ideal sleeping position that does not contract the calves? Thank you...

Re: Sleeping position

Julie on 7/19/01 at 16:11 (053748)

I'm not sure if you were addressing your question to me or Dr Reid, but I'll have a go. I don't think there is any sleeping position thnat doesn't contract the calves. When the feet are relaxed, as they are in sleep, they are naturally plantar flexed. You can either investigate night splints, which hold the feet in the dorsiflexed position all night, and/or make sure you stretch before you get out of bed.

Just realized you were asking Dr Reid. Sorry. I'll post this anyway as I've written it and she can correct me if I'm wrong.

Re: Sleeping position

Dr. Marlene Reid on 7/19/01 at 21:52 (053773)

Try sleeping on your side, the foot will have a better tendoncy to stay flexed.

Re: Sleeping position

Dr. Marlene Reid on 7/18/01 at hrmin (053643)

It's funny you should ask this tonight. Last night, I was trying to sleep on my stomach and my PF started to hurt (I have had a flare up the past two weeks). I always forget to mention sleeping positions to my PF patients. Sleeping on your stomach causes the fascia to contract, or at least maintain its contracted position.

Re: Sleeping position

tammie on 7/19/01 at 00:58 (053659)

Oh my YOU have pf to? I guess it just surprised me to hear that ! How do you deal with it and your life? As you must have a busy life!LOL I dont know why I should be surprised but I was when I read this post! Take care, and hope you get some rest! So no tummy sleeping huh, well that is ok by me as my lovely darling foot does not want to sleep anyways lol! Wow I really am still in shock with your saying you have the blasted pf also, I bet that makes you a very good Dr. for treating your patients! As you would know what they are feeling! Good night and best wishes on your feet!

Re: Sleeping position

Julie on 7/19/01 at 02:53 (053670)

Dondi, I saw Dr Marlene's advice about not sleeping on your front and would like to add that sleeping with your feet hanging off the bed in any position, front, back or sides, will plantar flex the feet and contract the fascia, tendons and calves. To be avoided at all costs, I'd say.

If your ankles now feel weird, it could be because of this extra contraction. Ask your doctor if it might not be time to investigate and try a night splint. It holds the foot in a dorsiflexed position, which keeps the calf muscles slightly stretched out all night.

Re: Sleeping position

Dondi on 7/19/01 at hrmin (053723)

I am sorry to hear you too have PF. What would you suggest as the ideal sleeping position that does not contract the calves? Thank you...

Re: Sleeping position

Julie on 7/19/01 at 16:11 (053748)

I'm not sure if you were addressing your question to me or Dr Reid, but I'll have a go. I don't think there is any sleeping position thnat doesn't contract the calves. When the feet are relaxed, as they are in sleep, they are naturally plantar flexed. You can either investigate night splints, which hold the feet in the dorsiflexed position all night, and/or make sure you stretch before you get out of bed.

Just realized you were asking Dr Reid. Sorry. I'll post this anyway as I've written it and she can correct me if I'm wrong.

Re: Sleeping position

Dr. Marlene Reid on 7/19/01 at 21:52 (053773)

Try sleeping on your side, the foot will have a better tendoncy to stay flexed.