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tension on the fascia

Posted by john h on 7/23/01 at 09:29 (054012)

i would be informative if we had a scientific method of measuring fascia tension both in the standing and reclined position. just from feeling i think my fascia is tight. we know that emotional tension can cause back muscles to tighten and cause back pain. could we not carry this a step further and say the back muscles are connected to the leg muscles,to the heel cord, to the fascia?

Re: tension on the fascia

Ed Davis, DPM on 7/23/01 at hrmin (054066)

It would be very helpful to have a way to measure plantar fascial tension. It would certainly help us know if our biomechanical control is effective or not.

Tight or short calf muscles effect plantar fascial tension particularly in the phase of gait after the heel has come off the ground (propulsive phase). This is why a number of individuals with plantar fasciitis need nightsplints, stretching or other devices to loosen the tight achilles.

Re: tension on the fascia

Julie on 7/24/01 at 01:22 (054080)

I think so, John. The lower back, legs and feet are a continuum, and the more one thinks about it, the more one sees that whatever goes on at either end of it is going to affect what goes on in between and at the other end. The article I referred to the other day describes precisely how pronation can cause lumbo-sacral problems, and of course we know how lumbo-sacral problems can affect the feet. Looking at the 'bits' of the body in isolation never tells the whole story. Perhaps podiatrists and chiropractors should set up together.

Re: tension on the fascia

john h on 7/24/01 at 08:57 (054107)

i think most people are pronators as the natural gait seems to be for your heel to strike on the outside and roll inwards. the wear on my shoes confirm this in my case. most of my running friends show the same wear pattern. if pronation is the natural order of humans then how much pronation is over pronation? as i walk behind people i have become very aware of how their feet strike the ground. i am amazed at the way some people run and walk and do not have problems

Re: tension on the fascia

Ed Davis, DPM on 7/23/01 at hrmin (054066)

It would be very helpful to have a way to measure plantar fascial tension. It would certainly help us know if our biomechanical control is effective or not.

Tight or short calf muscles effect plantar fascial tension particularly in the phase of gait after the heel has come off the ground (propulsive phase). This is why a number of individuals with plantar fasciitis need nightsplints, stretching or other devices to loosen the tight achilles.

Re: tension on the fascia

Julie on 7/24/01 at 01:22 (054080)

I think so, John. The lower back, legs and feet are a continuum, and the more one thinks about it, the more one sees that whatever goes on at either end of it is going to affect what goes on in between and at the other end. The article I referred to the other day describes precisely how pronation can cause lumbo-sacral problems, and of course we know how lumbo-sacral problems can affect the feet. Looking at the 'bits' of the body in isolation never tells the whole story. Perhaps podiatrists and chiropractors should set up together.

Re: tension on the fascia

john h on 7/24/01 at 08:57 (054107)

i think most people are pronators as the natural gait seems to be for your heel to strike on the outside and roll inwards. the wear on my shoes confirm this in my case. most of my running friends show the same wear pattern. if pronation is the natural order of humans then how much pronation is over pronation? as i walk behind people i have become very aware of how their feet strike the ground. i am amazed at the way some people run and walk and do not have problems