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do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

Posted by elliott on 7/27/01 at 10:08 (054479)

The impression I get from many people with intransigent PF is that they try many, many doctors of different sorts, go through much of the treatment they could have read about themselves anyway (rest, ice, NSAIDS, stretching, taping, numerous orthotics, ultrasound, cortisone, night brace), and after all is said and done, they still have the problem. Relief, or at least partial relief, sometimes comes several years later, when in some cases, it might've been just the passage of time and cessation of activity that helped rather than the great individualized treatment received.

Obviously, there's no known simple cure for PF or everyone would be doing it, and I'm not blaming the docs for that. What I'm getting at here is, do you find a specific doctor to have provided more insight and help than another doc for your own particular case over and above what almost any other good doc would've done or you could have read about and in many cases done yourself? Or does it not seem to matter that much?

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

nancy s. on 7/27/01 at 11:05 (054496)

elliott, i do have faith in my sports med doc, probably because when i finally found him, he listened, he educated me, he saw me at two-week intervals to monitor me closely, and he sent me for nearly 6 months of PT. (i needed the PT most for tendonitises that developed as a result of untreated pf, and also to break up scar tissue around the pf.)
if i had found him early on, before seeing an uninterested and noneducating pod and before finding heelspurs.com, i'd still probably be crazy about him.
if i'd found heelspurs.com early on, and then soon found this sports med doc, i might have considered him a bit superfluous. but i do think each case needs to be diagnosed properly, and many of us develop different related complications after 'walking funny,' so i think if i were still in the throes of acute pf and tendonitis, i'd want the continuing attention of a good doctor, and i'd continue looking until i found one.
nancy

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

john h on 7/27/01 at 11:41 (054499)

unfortunately for me elliot i found this board about 2 years to late. if i had the info on this board early on i do not think i would be where i am today. i think i would be running 10k races.

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

Laura S. on 7/27/01 at 13:12 (054516)

I have gone to three podiatrists, and only my third one actually seemed knowledgable and diagnosed my condition as PF. By the time I saw her my condition was pretty severe, whereas four months earlier, when I was seeing he first podiatrist, I was almost completely healed (just due to rest), and if I'd had any sort of proper treatment or advice (or orthotics, which would have been the best thing of all then), I know I would be completely healed now. Instead, I spent two months with that doctor, three with another incompetent doctor who said that I would heal by myself as long as I do stretches (the stretches he showed ended up irritating me more than anything), and now that I finally have a good doctor, my PF is to the point where i'm rolling myself around my apartment on my computer chair because I can't step on my foot. So the moral of the story is, find a good doctor!!!Do research, I smack myself every day for not doing it earlier, I found the doctor I have now through the rate your doctor section on this site. I'm still expecting a full recovery now (I'm only 16!this is too early!), but I'm afraid this is something I'm going to have to be very careful about for the rest of my life...

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

Glenn X on 7/27/01 at hrmin (054523)

Elliott:
I think the right doctor makes a huge difference. Many of those I've had in the past who haven't helped me along have been hamstrung by a health-care system that gets in their way and in my way. Efficiency has replaced effectiveness. The relationship with a patient has become a basic diagnosis supported by rudimentary follow-on care. It's up to me to schedule the next visit, which I'm not much inclined to do because follow-on visits aren't very trouble-shooting in nature. Rather they seem like deja-vu to the previous visit, and merely a step along a path to surgery.

Great doctors rise above the interference of this broken-health-care-system; average doctors do not. Great PF doctors post on this web-site; average PF doctors have never heard of it.

My most recent podiatrist understood about orthotic support and flexibility, and suggested a night splint. He was the first to ever measure my ankle dorsiflexion. He was aware of ECSWT (but not current on progress with that technology). He was even rated a 10 by one visitor to heelspurs, which was why I went to him.

But he never mentioned resting the fascia. Didn't know about 2-strip taping, and never suggested any other method; wasn't helpful at all with practical solutions to flexibility, suggesting only weight-bearing stretches, even off a step. He sent me to a Physical Therapist who offered better guidance on stretching, but they too felt I needed to push through the pain, and had no suggestions for non-weight-bearing stretches. And even though someone rated this podiatrist a 10 on heelspurs, he'd never heard of the site.

At my last (and I mean last) visit, this podiatrist described three different types of surgery that could be performed, and suggested studies indicate none of the three are more or less effective than the other. We ended the visit with him suggesting I try walking without crutches in my 'removable-cast' night splint. 'With my orthotics inserted,' I asked? 'No,' he replied. Earlier in my PF naivetĪ I might have tried his suggestion, but not now.

I think this guy might be a 'good' doctor, and can probably help 80 percent of the PF patients that walk in his office. But good isn't good enough for a chronic condition, and even for a mild, early condition, I think he might be even more informed, more helpful with specific directions, say with flexibility.

Next week I'm going to see one of the doctors that regularly posts on this site. It's a 160 mile drive from where I live, but I can't describe how much more confident you feel when anticipating a consultation with an authenticated expert. Were I you I'd do everything I could to do the same.

(In fact I wonder if there's a place for Doctors to register on this site so it's easier to track them down. I'm thinking of something outside the 'doctor search.' Be nice if they can do this, and also include their vitae).

Re: maybe I have a different perspective than some of you

elliott on 7/27/01 at 14:06 (054524)

I used to run (last run, October 10, 2000; I could just cry it meant so much to me, but many of your stories are also very sad) until bilateral TTS and its bilateral surgical aftermath did me in. Can't wear most shoes right now due to some lingering TTS problems in one foot. Might have PF in the other, but I think it's getting better as time passes. Anyway, just about all runners know about PF, whether they've had it or not, because they know other runners who have or have had it. Detailed material on PF, whether on the Web or in print, are easily available and they've read it. After trying ice, rest, NSAIDs, etc., they then go through various doctors, some of them attuned to athletes and their problems, but I have not witnessed an obvious success route. It seems many of you have had a different path, in some cases having never heard of it till later and many taking longer to get diagnosed. I'm getting the impression from here and from people I know personally that PF isn't exactly so rare, even for non-runners, and I just think these docs who didn't help intially should have been more aware of the possiblity of PF and its treatments. And my question is, among those who do, are some far more valuable than others? As one example, is there someone out there who, based on the exact type of PF and foot type you have, knows exactly what type of orthotic to try, and not just the one he happens to have a contract to sell (and to be skeptical, often the most expensive one). Or whether ultrasound or cortisone will be of any value. In short, without just trying hit-or-miss techniques or things you've read about and can do yourself.

Re: My 2 cents...not worth much but I'll try.

Carmen H on 7/27/01 at 15:32 (054539)

Hi Elliot....I know about the crying. I have often! I went to a POD the day after my foot started to hurt. He taped them and said keep them on ice and rest. Ummm 'Rest like the flu? Ice them when? Will the tape stay on?' I had questions even before I saw the back of his head leaving my room 4 minutes after he came in. Well....I walked barefoot for 3-5 days (because I was NOT told not to) I didn't stretch ONCE (b/c I was not told to) I iced too long (b/c I was not told how long) I didn't do ANY exercising of the fascia ( b/c I was not told to) and I wore the same ol shoes I had been wearing (b/c I was not told ANY differently). The tape fell off the next day. Needless to say he prescribed me Orthotics on my next visit and STILL didn't give me stretching advice UNTIL I said 'Hey wait a minute before you go...what kind of stretches do I need to be doing??' He showed the runners stretch to me in the WRONG form. Now mind you this POD had PF and still didn't take the time of day to talk to me. I cancelled my next appt. and looked for a SPECIALIST on FOOT and ANKLE Ortho. right away. And can you believe that they put these little blue pieces of footsie things on my bare feet and had me walk around to the x ray area on concrete floors???????? I WILL be taking my notes I journaled on my symptoms and treatments tried etc, the list of information Julie gave me on stretching, The ideal Doc visit that was posted on here earlier and I WILL not be bullied out of my time with him. I will even be so kind as to call ahead and tell them I will be needing a bit more time then most people WITH the doctor. NOT sitting in their waiting room or in the treatment room alone....with the actual doctor. I can't spend one more dollar on chasing a doctor around for his time.
I hate to sound like a pain in the ass but I shouldn't have to remind ANOTHER doctor this is my body I am trusting him with. I repeat 'I am trusting you with my body' please treat me right. I am a bit of a spit fire but I will be very kind about my approach and explain my fears and concerns about my active life being over b/c of this and how important it is I have someone who wants to HELP me. Not just send me on my way....
Does anything I have written even pertain to what you wrote? Sorry I got of on a tangent about Doctors....Thnak god for all of the great ones out there! We are truly blessed that they exist!

Re: Good for you, Carmen

Julie on 7/27/01 at 15:58 (054543)

Just keep that spitfire anger bubbling until your appointment, and when you're there, keep asking your questions until you get answers. I found it useful to write all my questions down and to go through them one by one. I kept looking down at the paper - the better to ignore the pod's edginess.

Oh - and don't forget to leave yourself space between questions to jot down the answers.

Re: My 2 cents...not worth much but I'll try.

Julie on 7/28/01 at 06:52 (054618)

Carmen, I've just read your message again and seen that the podiatrist you saw gave you four minutes. That's appalling. Please don't take that as a guide to what you can expect when you see the new doctor on Wednesday. You have the right to expect a full consultation, which should include a detailed interview to assess your situation, your symptoms and how long you've had them, how the problem started and why you think it started, etc. You may be asked to complete a questionnaire for the consultant to look at before he sees you. You should be given a full examination, including an assessment of your calf and achilles length/flexibility, and an evaluation of your gait, and, depending on what these investigations reveal, a suggested plan of treatment. And a follow-up appointment. In your case, and taking into account your sciatica and piriformis syndrome, which may be and probably are related to what's going on in your feet, the consultation should also include an assessment of your back.

And there should be time for you to ask questions and be given full answers. All this cannot possibly take less than half an hour . My initial consultation took an hour, and although I was not happy with the effects of some of the things the pod suggested, notably the wall stretches, I was satisfied that I'd been thoroughly assessed - and listened to.

Don't be satisfied with less than a full consultation. If you're in doubt as to what's being offered, call the doctor's office and ask how long his initial consultation is. It may be that you'll get the amount of time you pay for, in which case borrow if you have to, to get on the road to getting this sorted out.

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

Beverly on 7/28/01 at 14:15 (054643)

This is an excellent question, especially for newcomers.

I think I might not be chatting with you all right now if I had found a good sports med doc earlier. Unfortunately, my first doc, the pod, told me to stop stretching... that it was too soon. I went through a miserable saga of foot pain and only months later did I find a doctor who took my problem seriously. He gave me a generous PT script... actually went to PT for six months. And his physician's assist, whom I saw thereafterwards, did everything he knew to do for me. Unfortunately, for some of us, that just is not enough. I often wonder how different my life might be now had I found a doctor early on who took this problem seriously early on and knew how to treat it.

And sometimes it is just luck. When I moved to a new city, I got a new sports med. doc. I don't think he is any better than the sports med. doc I saw in my old city, but he hooked me up with an orthodist who made my first set of successful orthodics. It did not fix my problem, but it did improve it. I had tried orthodics several times before with no success. I say luck, because my new doc gave me a list of places to get orthodics and the one I chose off the list was my 'lucky' day.

But then again, by then I was armed with lots of information I'd gathered here and perhaps that old adage that 'God does not give us more than we can bear' rang true.

What I look for today in a foot doc is someone who is patient, good listener, open to a variety of treatments, in NOT knife happy, keeps up with the latest stuff like EWST, and is conservative about the use of cortisone.
Best wishes,
Beverly

Re: You know I printed it Julie...

Carmen H on 7/28/01 at 21:15 (054666)

Of course I printed your valuable information! I am spending Tuesday night typing everything into a format the Doc will understand. I already have it in a word program...my whole schedule of events since this happened.
You should be getting paid for the time you spend on here helping us Julie....as should the docs that provide us such great info! I am normally the one who provides advice for people...I feel so helpless with this. Maybe from all I have learned I will be able to.
My neighbor has PF and her doc had her doing exercises that I could not imagine....Tip toe stretches etc.
SO glad and grateful for Heelspurs.com
Scott....I applaud you for starting this site....!!!

Re: You know I printed it Julie...

Julie on 7/29/01 at 02:35 (054676)

Carmen, just a thought. Be a little bit careful - there are lots of doctors out there who respond defensively to patients who tell them what they've learned on the internet. You'll have a better chance of establishing a good relationship with your new doc if you keep your heelspurs.com knowledge to yourself. Just stick to the facts of your history, ask your questions, and listen to the answers you get.

No-one wants to get paid for helping. You won't either, when you use what you've learned to help others. Which you will - as long as you don't waltz away from here the minute your feet feel better.

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 7/29/01 at hrmin (054681)

Elliott, considering the positive feedback being posted on this website over the past few weeks about the effectiveness of Jade 168 Balm,(also, more than 70% of 30 PF trial participants have had significant pain relief within 4 weeks of treatment)there clearly is now a known simple (and cheap) cure for PF in at least a percentage of patients. Several of these participants have had complete resolution of symptoms within the first week. All therapists, including doctors have a duty of care to not only inform you about your problem but to also give you the best treatment options based on efficacy, cost and safety of use. The Jade holds its own in all three areas.

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

Scott R on 7/29/01 at 08:16 (054682)

Dr. Reynolds, you're advertising too much here for the Jade. I think your results are exaggerated. You claim 70% of patients are getting significant pain relief, but by my interpretation of the responses I'm getting from 23 patients, I'd say it's closer to 15%.

Re: Go get 'em!

Glenn X on 7/29/01 at hrmin (054685)

Carmen: I TOTALLY concur with all of your recognitions, and often voice them to myself. A lot of folks here on heelspurs, beginning with Scott, extending through the health-care professionals and laypeople alike, have and continue to share critically helpful informtion, purely for the betterment of others. It's therapeutic feeling so cared about.

You too are an inspiration. I look forward to your messages and glean energy from your upbeat and tenacious approach to all this.

I hope and trust your doctor's visit exceeds your expectations. I have no doubt your doctor will learn something from it.

Re: so at least one mind hasn't been Jaded :-)

elliott on 7/29/01 at 14:57 (054708)

In looking over the responses, I'd say it's far from clear. As is often the case with such tests, some of those experiencing relief were simultaneously trying other new treatment modalities, and the subjects' beginning pain levels varied tremendously as well. Of course, that's not Dr. Reynolds' fault. Also, I'd like to point out that in almost all such tests on humans, there seems to be a reasonably significant placebo effect, so some may feel improvement simply because they tried something they expected to help, and this effect should be stripped out as well before deciding on its efficacy. Just an idea, but, with this tremendous Web site (thanks, Scott!) and the power it carries, we could solve this problem for the more important topical or oral drugs that come along, i.e. if Scott or someone else obtained samples of both true Jade and jaded Jade (i.e. a placebo, but still with that lemon scent) and then randomly sends some subjects the placebo and keeps tabs of the responses. (I guess there's two types of double-blind studies, those where the recipients know they might be getting a placebo and those where they don't, but the latter is probably ethically and legally harder to set up, and it's too late now anyway because we all know of Jade.) After several months when the study is over and the results tabulated, those who received the placebo would be sent the real thing. It's just a thought.

Dr. Reynolds, I don't want to pooh-pooh every possible aid that comes along, as I want relief just as others do. I just feel that based on real-life experience, a healthy dose of skepticism is good for us all. Can I ask what are the key active ingredients in Jade? Thanks.

Re: I will be putting it all in a format....

Carmen H on 7/29/01 at 17:47 (054712)

I have a format I will be typing my questions in...with the knowledge i have gained through heelspurs.com incorporated quietly and nicely into it. Thanks for the warning....trust me I know doctors are not very excited about a lot of 'self taught' information off the internet. I went through that with the Piriformus....
Three more days. I can't wait to go to the Doctor.....
I over did it yesterday painting some furniture. I may have overstretched the Fascia as I was squatting a bit more then I should. WEight bearing stretches do NOT work for me I am finding out!
I do like the one where I lay with my rear end against the wall and my feet up the wall. That one provides a tremendously good stretch and relaxes my whole body. I always feel better afterwards.

Re: You got it Glenn!

Carmen H on 7/29/01 at 17:51 (054714)

I totally agree with being cared about being therapeutic!! It has given me so much relief just to be able to have this site to go to even just to read other people's results and positive stories!
I will let you know what I find out at the doc....I am interested to see how knowledgeable he is on PF and hopefully make a new friend in him as well! I have a history of making good friends with my doctors....It's great but I hate when I move to a new area or have to leave.
Although...I can't say I would REALLY mind leaving this one if it meant successful treatment!
Thanks for your encouragement!

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

nancy s. on 7/27/01 at 11:05 (054496)

elliott, i do have faith in my sports med doc, probably because when i finally found him, he listened, he educated me, he saw me at two-week intervals to monitor me closely, and he sent me for nearly 6 months of PT. (i needed the PT most for tendonitises that developed as a result of untreated pf, and also to break up scar tissue around the pf.)
if i had found him early on, before seeing an uninterested and noneducating pod and before finding heelspurs.com, i'd still probably be crazy about him.
if i'd found heelspurs.com early on, and then soon found this sports med doc, i might have considered him a bit superfluous. but i do think each case needs to be diagnosed properly, and many of us develop different related complications after 'walking funny,' so i think if i were still in the throes of acute pf and tendonitis, i'd want the continuing attention of a good doctor, and i'd continue looking until i found one.
nancy

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

john h on 7/27/01 at 11:41 (054499)

unfortunately for me elliot i found this board about 2 years to late. if i had the info on this board early on i do not think i would be where i am today. i think i would be running 10k races.

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

Laura S. on 7/27/01 at 13:12 (054516)

I have gone to three podiatrists, and only my third one actually seemed knowledgable and diagnosed my condition as PF. By the time I saw her my condition was pretty severe, whereas four months earlier, when I was seeing he first podiatrist, I was almost completely healed (just due to rest), and if I'd had any sort of proper treatment or advice (or orthotics, which would have been the best thing of all then), I know I would be completely healed now. Instead, I spent two months with that doctor, three with another incompetent doctor who said that I would heal by myself as long as I do stretches (the stretches he showed ended up irritating me more than anything), and now that I finally have a good doctor, my PF is to the point where i'm rolling myself around my apartment on my computer chair because I can't step on my foot. So the moral of the story is, find a good doctor!!!Do research, I smack myself every day for not doing it earlier, I found the doctor I have now through the rate your doctor section on this site. I'm still expecting a full recovery now (I'm only 16!this is too early!), but I'm afraid this is something I'm going to have to be very careful about for the rest of my life...

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

Glenn X on 7/27/01 at hrmin (054523)

Elliott:
I think the right doctor makes a huge difference. Many of those I've had in the past who haven't helped me along have been hamstrung by a health-care system that gets in their way and in my way. Efficiency has replaced effectiveness. The relationship with a patient has become a basic diagnosis supported by rudimentary follow-on care. It's up to me to schedule the next visit, which I'm not much inclined to do because follow-on visits aren't very trouble-shooting in nature. Rather they seem like deja-vu to the previous visit, and merely a step along a path to surgery.

Great doctors rise above the interference of this broken-health-care-system; average doctors do not. Great PF doctors post on this web-site; average PF doctors have never heard of it.

My most recent podiatrist understood about orthotic support and flexibility, and suggested a night splint. He was the first to ever measure my ankle dorsiflexion. He was aware of ECSWT (but not current on progress with that technology). He was even rated a 10 by one visitor to heelspurs, which was why I went to him.

But he never mentioned resting the fascia. Didn't know about 2-strip taping, and never suggested any other method; wasn't helpful at all with practical solutions to flexibility, suggesting only weight-bearing stretches, even off a step. He sent me to a Physical Therapist who offered better guidance on stretching, but they too felt I needed to push through the pain, and had no suggestions for non-weight-bearing stretches. And even though someone rated this podiatrist a 10 on heelspurs, he'd never heard of the site.

At my last (and I mean last) visit, this podiatrist described three different types of surgery that could be performed, and suggested studies indicate none of the three are more or less effective than the other. We ended the visit with him suggesting I try walking without crutches in my 'removable-cast' night splint. 'With my orthotics inserted,' I asked? 'No,' he replied. Earlier in my PF naivetĪ I might have tried his suggestion, but not now.

I think this guy might be a 'good' doctor, and can probably help 80 percent of the PF patients that walk in his office. But good isn't good enough for a chronic condition, and even for a mild, early condition, I think he might be even more informed, more helpful with specific directions, say with flexibility.

Next week I'm going to see one of the doctors that regularly posts on this site. It's a 160 mile drive from where I live, but I can't describe how much more confident you feel when anticipating a consultation with an authenticated expert. Were I you I'd do everything I could to do the same.

(In fact I wonder if there's a place for Doctors to register on this site so it's easier to track them down. I'm thinking of something outside the 'doctor search.' Be nice if they can do this, and also include their vitae).

Re: maybe I have a different perspective than some of you

elliott on 7/27/01 at 14:06 (054524)

I used to run (last run, October 10, 2000; I could just cry it meant so much to me, but many of your stories are also very sad) until bilateral TTS and its bilateral surgical aftermath did me in. Can't wear most shoes right now due to some lingering TTS problems in one foot. Might have PF in the other, but I think it's getting better as time passes. Anyway, just about all runners know about PF, whether they've had it or not, because they know other runners who have or have had it. Detailed material on PF, whether on the Web or in print, are easily available and they've read it. After trying ice, rest, NSAIDs, etc., they then go through various doctors, some of them attuned to athletes and their problems, but I have not witnessed an obvious success route. It seems many of you have had a different path, in some cases having never heard of it till later and many taking longer to get diagnosed. I'm getting the impression from here and from people I know personally that PF isn't exactly so rare, even for non-runners, and I just think these docs who didn't help intially should have been more aware of the possiblity of PF and its treatments. And my question is, among those who do, are some far more valuable than others? As one example, is there someone out there who, based on the exact type of PF and foot type you have, knows exactly what type of orthotic to try, and not just the one he happens to have a contract to sell (and to be skeptical, often the most expensive one). Or whether ultrasound or cortisone will be of any value. In short, without just trying hit-or-miss techniques or things you've read about and can do yourself.

Re: My 2 cents...not worth much but I'll try.

Carmen H on 7/27/01 at 15:32 (054539)

Hi Elliot....I know about the crying. I have often! I went to a POD the day after my foot started to hurt. He taped them and said keep them on ice and rest. Ummm 'Rest like the flu? Ice them when? Will the tape stay on?' I had questions even before I saw the back of his head leaving my room 4 minutes after he came in. Well....I walked barefoot for 3-5 days (because I was NOT told not to) I didn't stretch ONCE (b/c I was not told to) I iced too long (b/c I was not told how long) I didn't do ANY exercising of the fascia ( b/c I was not told to) and I wore the same ol shoes I had been wearing (b/c I was not told ANY differently). The tape fell off the next day. Needless to say he prescribed me Orthotics on my next visit and STILL didn't give me stretching advice UNTIL I said 'Hey wait a minute before you go...what kind of stretches do I need to be doing??' He showed the runners stretch to me in the WRONG form. Now mind you this POD had PF and still didn't take the time of day to talk to me. I cancelled my next appt. and looked for a SPECIALIST on FOOT and ANKLE Ortho. right away. And can you believe that they put these little blue pieces of footsie things on my bare feet and had me walk around to the x ray area on concrete floors???????? I WILL be taking my notes I journaled on my symptoms and treatments tried etc, the list of information Julie gave me on stretching, The ideal Doc visit that was posted on here earlier and I WILL not be bullied out of my time with him. I will even be so kind as to call ahead and tell them I will be needing a bit more time then most people WITH the doctor. NOT sitting in their waiting room or in the treatment room alone....with the actual doctor. I can't spend one more dollar on chasing a doctor around for his time.
I hate to sound like a pain in the ass but I shouldn't have to remind ANOTHER doctor this is my body I am trusting him with. I repeat 'I am trusting you with my body' please treat me right. I am a bit of a spit fire but I will be very kind about my approach and explain my fears and concerns about my active life being over b/c of this and how important it is I have someone who wants to HELP me. Not just send me on my way....
Does anything I have written even pertain to what you wrote? Sorry I got of on a tangent about Doctors....Thnak god for all of the great ones out there! We are truly blessed that they exist!

Re: Good for you, Carmen

Julie on 7/27/01 at 15:58 (054543)

Just keep that spitfire anger bubbling until your appointment, and when you're there, keep asking your questions until you get answers. I found it useful to write all my questions down and to go through them one by one. I kept looking down at the paper - the better to ignore the pod's edginess.

Oh - and don't forget to leave yourself space between questions to jot down the answers.

Re: My 2 cents...not worth much but I'll try.

Julie on 7/28/01 at 06:52 (054618)

Carmen, I've just read your message again and seen that the podiatrist you saw gave you four minutes. That's appalling. Please don't take that as a guide to what you can expect when you see the new doctor on Wednesday. You have the right to expect a full consultation, which should include a detailed interview to assess your situation, your symptoms and how long you've had them, how the problem started and why you think it started, etc. You may be asked to complete a questionnaire for the consultant to look at before he sees you. You should be given a full examination, including an assessment of your calf and achilles length/flexibility, and an evaluation of your gait, and, depending on what these investigations reveal, a suggested plan of treatment. And a follow-up appointment. In your case, and taking into account your sciatica and piriformis syndrome, which may be and probably are related to what's going on in your feet, the consultation should also include an assessment of your back.

And there should be time for you to ask questions and be given full answers. All this cannot possibly take less than half an hour . My initial consultation took an hour, and although I was not happy with the effects of some of the things the pod suggested, notably the wall stretches, I was satisfied that I'd been thoroughly assessed - and listened to.

Don't be satisfied with less than a full consultation. If you're in doubt as to what's being offered, call the doctor's office and ask how long his initial consultation is. It may be that you'll get the amount of time you pay for, in which case borrow if you have to, to get on the road to getting this sorted out.

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

Beverly on 7/28/01 at 14:15 (054643)

This is an excellent question, especially for newcomers.

I think I might not be chatting with you all right now if I had found a good sports med doc earlier. Unfortunately, my first doc, the pod, told me to stop stretching... that it was too soon. I went through a miserable saga of foot pain and only months later did I find a doctor who took my problem seriously. He gave me a generous PT script... actually went to PT for six months. And his physician's assist, whom I saw thereafterwards, did everything he knew to do for me. Unfortunately, for some of us, that just is not enough. I often wonder how different my life might be now had I found a doctor early on who took this problem seriously early on and knew how to treat it.

And sometimes it is just luck. When I moved to a new city, I got a new sports med. doc. I don't think he is any better than the sports med. doc I saw in my old city, but he hooked me up with an orthodist who made my first set of successful orthodics. It did not fix my problem, but it did improve it. I had tried orthodics several times before with no success. I say luck, because my new doc gave me a list of places to get orthodics and the one I chose off the list was my 'lucky' day.

But then again, by then I was armed with lots of information I'd gathered here and perhaps that old adage that 'God does not give us more than we can bear' rang true.

What I look for today in a foot doc is someone who is patient, good listener, open to a variety of treatments, in NOT knife happy, keeps up with the latest stuff like EWST, and is conservative about the use of cortisone.
Best wishes,
Beverly

Re: You know I printed it Julie...

Carmen H on 7/28/01 at 21:15 (054666)

Of course I printed your valuable information! I am spending Tuesday night typing everything into a format the Doc will understand. I already have it in a word program...my whole schedule of events since this happened.
You should be getting paid for the time you spend on here helping us Julie....as should the docs that provide us such great info! I am normally the one who provides advice for people...I feel so helpless with this. Maybe from all I have learned I will be able to.
My neighbor has PF and her doc had her doing exercises that I could not imagine....Tip toe stretches etc.
SO glad and grateful for Heelspurs.com
Scott....I applaud you for starting this site....!!!

Re: You know I printed it Julie...

Julie on 7/29/01 at 02:35 (054676)

Carmen, just a thought. Be a little bit careful - there are lots of doctors out there who respond defensively to patients who tell them what they've learned on the internet. You'll have a better chance of establishing a good relationship with your new doc if you keep your heelspurs.com knowledge to yourself. Just stick to the facts of your history, ask your questions, and listen to the answers you get.

No-one wants to get paid for helping. You won't either, when you use what you've learned to help others. Which you will - as long as you don't waltz away from here the minute your feet feel better.

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

Dr. Chris Reynolds on 7/29/01 at hrmin (054681)

Elliott, considering the positive feedback being posted on this website over the past few weeks about the effectiveness of Jade 168 Balm,(also, more than 70% of 30 PF trial participants have had significant pain relief within 4 weeks of treatment)there clearly is now a known simple (and cheap) cure for PF in at least a percentage of patients. Several of these participants have had complete resolution of symptoms within the first week. All therapists, including doctors have a duty of care to not only inform you about your problem but to also give you the best treatment options based on efficacy, cost and safety of use. The Jade holds its own in all three areas.

Re: do you all generally have faith in your doc for PF?

Scott R on 7/29/01 at 08:16 (054682)

Dr. Reynolds, you're advertising too much here for the Jade. I think your results are exaggerated. You claim 70% of patients are getting significant pain relief, but by my interpretation of the responses I'm getting from 23 patients, I'd say it's closer to 15%.

Re: Go get 'em!

Glenn X on 7/29/01 at hrmin (054685)

Carmen: I TOTALLY concur with all of your recognitions, and often voice them to myself. A lot of folks here on heelspurs, beginning with Scott, extending through the health-care professionals and laypeople alike, have and continue to share critically helpful informtion, purely for the betterment of others. It's therapeutic feeling so cared about.

You too are an inspiration. I look forward to your messages and glean energy from your upbeat and tenacious approach to all this.

I hope and trust your doctor's visit exceeds your expectations. I have no doubt your doctor will learn something from it.

Re: so at least one mind hasn't been Jaded :-)

elliott on 7/29/01 at 14:57 (054708)

In looking over the responses, I'd say it's far from clear. As is often the case with such tests, some of those experiencing relief were simultaneously trying other new treatment modalities, and the subjects' beginning pain levels varied tremendously as well. Of course, that's not Dr. Reynolds' fault. Also, I'd like to point out that in almost all such tests on humans, there seems to be a reasonably significant placebo effect, so some may feel improvement simply because they tried something they expected to help, and this effect should be stripped out as well before deciding on its efficacy. Just an idea, but, with this tremendous Web site (thanks, Scott!) and the power it carries, we could solve this problem for the more important topical or oral drugs that come along, i.e. if Scott or someone else obtained samples of both true Jade and jaded Jade (i.e. a placebo, but still with that lemon scent) and then randomly sends some subjects the placebo and keeps tabs of the responses. (I guess there's two types of double-blind studies, those where the recipients know they might be getting a placebo and those where they don't, but the latter is probably ethically and legally harder to set up, and it's too late now anyway because we all know of Jade.) After several months when the study is over and the results tabulated, those who received the placebo would be sent the real thing. It's just a thought.

Dr. Reynolds, I don't want to pooh-pooh every possible aid that comes along, as I want relief just as others do. I just feel that based on real-life experience, a healthy dose of skepticism is good for us all. Can I ask what are the key active ingredients in Jade? Thanks.

Re: I will be putting it all in a format....

Carmen H on 7/29/01 at 17:47 (054712)

I have a format I will be typing my questions in...with the knowledge i have gained through heelspurs.com incorporated quietly and nicely into it. Thanks for the warning....trust me I know doctors are not very excited about a lot of 'self taught' information off the internet. I went through that with the Piriformus....
Three more days. I can't wait to go to the Doctor.....
I over did it yesterday painting some furniture. I may have overstretched the Fascia as I was squatting a bit more then I should. WEight bearing stretches do NOT work for me I am finding out!
I do like the one where I lay with my rear end against the wall and my feet up the wall. That one provides a tremendously good stretch and relaxes my whole body. I always feel better afterwards.

Re: You got it Glenn!

Carmen H on 7/29/01 at 17:51 (054714)

I totally agree with being cared about being therapeutic!! It has given me so much relief just to be able to have this site to go to even just to read other people's results and positive stories!
I will let you know what I find out at the doc....I am interested to see how knowledgeable he is on PF and hopefully make a new friend in him as well! I have a history of making good friends with my doctors....It's great but I hate when I move to a new area or have to leave.
Although...I can't say I would REALLY mind leaving this one if it meant successful treatment!
Thanks for your encouragement!