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Cat-nap inflammation

Posted by Glenn X on 7/29/01 at hrmin (054688)

I have a curious 'symptom' I've always wondered about. I can sit in an easy chair reading a book for a couple of hours with no noticeable affect on my feet. But let me close my eyes and nod off for just a couple of minutes, at any time, and my foot swells. Both actually. Any guesses?

Re: Relaxation?

Carmen H on 7/29/01 at 18:03 (054720)

Maybe when you are awake reading you are tensing your feet (unawares of course) and keeping those foot muscles active and when you fall asleep your feet 'fall asleep' too resulting in swelling. Just a thought....?

Re: Cat-nap inflammation

Tammy M on 7/29/01 at 18:48 (054726)

Hi Glenn! Watch how you hold your feet when you sit down with a book, and compare that to how you hold them when you lie down. I tend to let my feet relax to a point when I lay down, thus shortening the fascia, and I think this is what makes it painful when I take my first steps in the morning. I know when I am just sitting down, I am more careful about stretching my calf muscles, and hold my feet at a 90 degree angle (as much as comfort will allow).

Re: Cat-nap inflammation

Julie on 7/30/01 at 02:45 (054761)

I agree with Tammy, Glenn. When your feet are relaxed, and they're probably more relaxed when you're relaxed, they'll naturally plantarflex, which contracts the fascias, tendons and muscles. That would be particularly true if your easy chair is one of those big comfy ones where your feet are hanging.

Re: Relaxation?

john h on 7/30/01 at 08:43 (054775)

not that this is your problem glenn but many years ago i developed a severe pain across the top of my foot. the doctor x-rayed it and after several visits had no answer. one night i awakened my self as i kicked a bar that goes across the bottom of my bed (restless leg syndrome). i was sleeping on my stomach. i had hit the bar exactly where my foot had been hurting for month. after that i moved my head closer to the head board and my painful foot was cured. i apparently was kicking that bar as i slept.

Re: Cat naps.

Glenn X on 7/30/01 at hrmin (054868)

Good input everybody. Thanks. Still a curiosity though. The swelling, which is moderate, happens after the briefest of cat-naps whether I'm laying down, nodding off in my car, or (I'm guessing) hanging upside down from my garage ceiling. Healthwise everything else is great. I've wondered if it weren't a way for the body to 'cushion' the first few steps after being at rest, but that's speculation. If no-one else has ever noticed this, I'll just tick it off as a personal wierdness.

Re: Cat naps.

Ed Davis, DPM on 7/30/01 at hrmin (054870)

Julie's idea seems to be the most plausible due to the relative position of plantarflexion. That would explain the post-static dyskinesia (pain after rest) but would not explain the presence of swelling. Generally elevation relieves swelling unless ones legs are crossed with one knee placing pressure on some of the veins in back of the other knee.
Ed

Re: Cat-nap inflammation

john h on 7/31/01 at 09:13 (054929)

i like the doctors idea glenn. elevate the feet above the heart and see if you have swelling. i always end up with my feet elevated when reading or watching tv because it takes the pressure off my low back.

Re: Send a picture of that Glenn!!!!

Carmen H on 8/01/01 at 16:51 (055127)

Okay if you'll send a picture of you hanging fromthe ceiling I'll buy your next Orthotics!!! ha ha ....just kidding...but it would be worth seeing!
ha

Re: Send a picture of that Glenn!!!!

Glenn X on 8/01/01 at hrmin (055163)

Carmen: That's actually a JohnH feat of, I believe experimental therapy, he described here a short time ago. I'm sure we'd all appreciate a picture of that.

Re: Relaxation?

Carmen H on 7/29/01 at 18:03 (054720)

Maybe when you are awake reading you are tensing your feet (unawares of course) and keeping those foot muscles active and when you fall asleep your feet 'fall asleep' too resulting in swelling. Just a thought....?

Re: Cat-nap inflammation

Tammy M on 7/29/01 at 18:48 (054726)

Hi Glenn! Watch how you hold your feet when you sit down with a book, and compare that to how you hold them when you lie down. I tend to let my feet relax to a point when I lay down, thus shortening the fascia, and I think this is what makes it painful when I take my first steps in the morning. I know when I am just sitting down, I am more careful about stretching my calf muscles, and hold my feet at a 90 degree angle (as much as comfort will allow).

Re: Cat-nap inflammation

Julie on 7/30/01 at 02:45 (054761)

I agree with Tammy, Glenn. When your feet are relaxed, and they're probably more relaxed when you're relaxed, they'll naturally plantarflex, which contracts the fascias, tendons and muscles. That would be particularly true if your easy chair is one of those big comfy ones where your feet are hanging.

Re: Relaxation?

john h on 7/30/01 at 08:43 (054775)

not that this is your problem glenn but many years ago i developed a severe pain across the top of my foot. the doctor x-rayed it and after several visits had no answer. one night i awakened my self as i kicked a bar that goes across the bottom of my bed (restless leg syndrome). i was sleeping on my stomach. i had hit the bar exactly where my foot had been hurting for month. after that i moved my head closer to the head board and my painful foot was cured. i apparently was kicking that bar as i slept.

Re: Cat naps.

Glenn X on 7/30/01 at hrmin (054868)

Good input everybody. Thanks. Still a curiosity though. The swelling, which is moderate, happens after the briefest of cat-naps whether I'm laying down, nodding off in my car, or (I'm guessing) hanging upside down from my garage ceiling. Healthwise everything else is great. I've wondered if it weren't a way for the body to 'cushion' the first few steps after being at rest, but that's speculation. If no-one else has ever noticed this, I'll just tick it off as a personal wierdness.

Re: Cat naps.

Ed Davis, DPM on 7/30/01 at hrmin (054870)

Julie's idea seems to be the most plausible due to the relative position of plantarflexion. That would explain the post-static dyskinesia (pain after rest) but would not explain the presence of swelling. Generally elevation relieves swelling unless ones legs are crossed with one knee placing pressure on some of the veins in back of the other knee.
Ed

Re: Cat-nap inflammation

john h on 7/31/01 at 09:13 (054929)

i like the doctors idea glenn. elevate the feet above the heart and see if you have swelling. i always end up with my feet elevated when reading or watching tv because it takes the pressure off my low back.

Re: Send a picture of that Glenn!!!!

Carmen H on 8/01/01 at 16:51 (055127)

Okay if you'll send a picture of you hanging fromthe ceiling I'll buy your next Orthotics!!! ha ha ....just kidding...but it would be worth seeing!
ha

Re: Send a picture of that Glenn!!!!

Glenn X on 8/01/01 at hrmin (055163)

Carmen: That's actually a JohnH feat of, I believe experimental therapy, he described here a short time ago. I'm sure we'd all appreciate a picture of that.