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PF and shoes

Posted by Dede J. on 7/30/01 at hrmin (054751)

I have been diagnosed by a podiatrist with PF, as well as a painful bursa on the bottom of my heel . The only shoes so far that are fairly comfortable are a good running shoe. Can anybody recommend something other than a running shoe that won't kill my feet? I'm a teacher and on my feet all day. The floor I stand on has no padding under the thin carpet (cement underneath). I need cushion on the heel as well as arch support. Any ideas?

Re: PF and shoes

Julie on 7/30/01 at 03:05 (054762)

I am not a doctor, but want to welcome to heelspurs.com, Dede.

If the running shoes are the only one's you're reasonably comfortable in, keep wearing them. You could also try Birkenstocks. But the real problem is that you're on your feet all day on the hardest, most PF-unfriendly surface imaginable. This is very likely to have contributed to your PF, and certainly isn't going to help matters as you try to address the problem. Could you try to sit down more often - perhaps when you're just speaking to your pupils, and not writing on the blackboard (if those still exist) or walking around amongst them? Any time spent off your feet is time well spent: resting the injured fascia is important.

Presumably you're not teaching during the summer? Make the most of the time off by resting your feet as much as you can, and informing yourself about the variety of conservative treatments for PF. You'll find a great deal of information in the heel pain book. You can also use the search facility.

Never go barefoot. Taping, to rest the fascia and support the arch, may be a help to you (instructions are in part 2 of the heel pain book). Icing can help reduce inflammation. Non-weight-bearing stretching to lengthen shortened calf muscles and achilles tendons.

Does your podiatrist know what is causing your PF? Has he seen you walk and has he identified any biomechanical faults that may need correcting with orthotics? What treatment plan has he suggested? Perhaps you could give us more information?

There are lots of people here who have been through what you are going through and can offer support and help, so keep visiting the site.

Re: PF and shoes

Julie on 7/30/01 at 03:05 (054762)

I am not a doctor, but want to welcome to heelspurs.com, Dede.

If the running shoes are the only one's you're reasonably comfortable in, keep wearing them. You could also try Birkenstocks. But the real problem is that you're on your feet all day on the hardest, most PF-unfriendly surface imaginable. This is very likely to have contributed to your PF, and certainly isn't going to help matters as you try to address the problem. Could you try to sit down more often - perhaps when you're just speaking to your pupils, and not writing on the blackboard (if those still exist) or walking around amongst them? Any time spent off your feet is time well spent: resting the injured fascia is important.

Presumably you're not teaching during the summer? Make the most of the time off by resting your feet as much as you can, and informing yourself about the variety of conservative treatments for PF. You'll find a great deal of information in the heel pain book. You can also use the search facility.

Never go barefoot. Taping, to rest the fascia and support the arch, may be a help to you (instructions are in part 2 of the heel pain book). Icing can help reduce inflammation. Non-weight-bearing stretching to lengthen shortened calf muscles and achilles tendons.

Does your podiatrist know what is causing your PF? Has he seen you walk and has he identified any biomechanical faults that may need correcting with orthotics? What treatment plan has he suggested? Perhaps you could give us more information?

There are lots of people here who have been through what you are going through and can offer support and help, so keep visiting the site.