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Thanks for recommending ART

Posted by JulieG on 8/06/01 at 09:20 (055620)

Just wanted to thank Donna SL for posting last month about Active Release Therapy. I had just been diagnosed with TTS, and was considering surgery when I found this message board. I've now had three session of ART and am feeling MUCH better. I now have hope of being able to resume a 'normal' life after suffering for the last year and going through surgery for PF.

Also wanted you to know that there are others of us out there who lurk and read what all of you say without posting ourselves. I admit to being very scared by some of your stories, and inspired by others. It's somehow reassuring to know that I'm not the only one going through this fight.

Thanks again for the help. I'm so grateful that I didn't have the surgery as my podiatrist suggested!!!

Re: Thanks for recommending ART

Matt L on 8/06/01 at 11:04 (055635)

Where exactly is the ART done for TTS? Did you fear that the aggressive massage could further compress the nerve?

Re: Julie G Re: Thanks for recommending ART

Donna SL on 8/06/01 at 12:34 (055639)

Hi Julie,

I am so happy to hear this. Thanks for letting me know. I'm going to show this to message to my chiropractor. You're the second person that I know of so far from this board that has confirmed that ART has helped them with TTS. I know some people were helped with PF, but this is really a thrill to hear it's helping another person with TTS. I know ART is excellent for nerve entrapment, but it's still great to hear when someone reports back with success.

I wish more people would try this.

Good luck with your continuing treatments.

P.S. Just curious. Can you give me an example of what stories scared you?

Donna

Re: Thanks for recommending ART

Donna SL on 8/06/01 at 12:48 (055641)

Matt,

ART is not aggressive massage. It's a special type of tissue manipulation, the frees the nerves of adhesions in fascia tissue, that are pressing on the nerves. The person performing this is usually a chiropractor who has intensive knowledge of nerve entrapment, and human anatomy. The purpose of ART is not to compress nerves, but to free them. I have posted extensively on this subject in April 01, and a small amount in the following months.

The Chiropractor works many areas of the lower extremities, along with the TT area.

Donna

Re: Thanks for recommending ART

Mike C. on 8/06/01 at hrmin (055643)

I've just been diagnosed with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome. What is ART? Where can I get some information on it and if it would be good for my condition? How can one compare or contrast it with the surgery alternative? I've heard that surgery to alleviate this condition is very problematic and doesn't work many times.

I'd appreciate someone sharing there experience and knowledge in this area with me.

Re: Thanks for recommending ART

wendyn on 8/06/01 at 20:35 (055706)

Julie - I am sorry some of the stories have scared you...I don't think that would ever be the intention of anyone!

Keep in mind that all the situations are different, and just because one person has a particular situation - it doesn't mean it will be the same (or as bad?)for you.

Re: ART is Active Release Techniques® & A question for Scott & Wendy

Janette on 8/06/01 at 23:35 (055723)

It took me too much time researching information on ART previously posted on the message board. So for the others who don't have time to sort through all the postings and want the info here it is. My impression of ART, from reading the entries in the message board is that it is very painful but people with PF have seen results. The entries go all the way back to 1999 and it was hard to tell if it was successful with TTS, but for me it would be worth a try.

ART Description:
The Active Release Techniques® (also know as ART®) Soft-Tissue Management System is a new and
highly successful approach to injuries of muscles, tendons, fascia, nerves, and the surrounding soft
tissues.

Here is the Web site for P. Michael Leahy, DC

http://www.activerelease.com

Scott, can we have a glossary, index or an update to Wendy's FAQs. I have spent lots of time searching the message boards and if you don't stay current on reading every entry, you can certainly miss some facts. It could even be some type of page, 'What works for some people' and 'What doesn't work'. I really think that Wendy could write a book on TTS from the information that she gives on the message board. Janette

Re: ART is Active Release Techniques® & A question for Scott & Wendy

wendyn on 8/06/01 at 23:49 (055724)

Janette - I'm off to bed - please email me at mailwendy1@home.com - perhaps we could collaborate on an update together and add some information (I've been miserably short on time lately to do a lot of things). You may be able to give some really good input into things that need to be added. You may also be able to light a much needed fire under my butt to get me to update it.

Re: ART is Active Release Techniques® & A question for Scott & Wendy

Donna SL on 8/07/01 at 01:49 (055727)

Janette,

ART shouldn't be painful if the technique is done properly. Most of the time, it actually feels quite good. Once in a while the chiropractor has to go a little deeper in certain areas, and it might hurt a little for around 15-20 seconds, but general it's not an unpleasant experience, and the person receiving the treatment should feel much relief after it's done.

Donna

Re: ART is Active Release Techniques® & A question for Scott & Wendy

Scott R on 8/07/01 at 07:40 (055735)

Janette, I'll publish whatever Wendy puts together.

Julie, thanks for reminding people of the birk website. Getting them a link somewhere eventhough they don't pay is one of those things on my neglected to do list.

Re: Birkenstock Outlet

Janette on 8/07/01 at 22:53 (055868)

Scott

Apart from ordering Birkenstocks from the German Birkenstock Web Site, there also is another alternative for some people. I found reference to the Birkenstock Outlet stores in the message boards. One was listed in Florida and another in California. I am in Arizona but had an upcoming conference in Florida. Birkenstocks have always been too narrow for my feet but I thought if there were an outlet shop close by, I would make it a point to check it out.

In Orlando I made a trip to the outlet shop and did pick up three pairs. They were all a slight bit narrow but for the price, I could afford to give them to throw them away if I really did not like them. The leather adjustable slide (I don't know the names as I left all the boxes in the hotel garbage) was $14.99 and I got two adjustable Betula's which I could use in water for $19.99 each.

It turned out the shop I was in was a 'temporary' Birkenstock outlet. The real outlet store was just down the road. Since I had come so far, I did check out the shop. The prices there were definitely higher but there was more variety. Also I was late and I had shoes! I had been reduced wearing:
- To work & outside the house: one pair of Ecco sandals and on a good day I may be able to put my foot in completely. I would just buy the exact same shoe when I needed another one. And it only comes in one color...
- Around the house & walking into the pool: a pair of Maseur sandals/slides
- Trying to exercise: Untied NB walking shoes for approximately 30 minutes or less, 3 x per week

I am alternating the Birkenstocks & Betula's around the house and walking into the pool. They are tight but they DO NOT cover the nerve.

I am actually working with a Pedorthist who is trying to find me something I can wear and not press on the nerve. I can stand/walk more in a foot covering that doesn't touch the nerve. Put a shoe and/or sock on and pain is nearly immediate. The 2nd step (if we still don't find the perfect shoe) will be to modify something I can wear now, eg my Ecco's, to miss touching the nerve. The 3rd step, if Step #2 does not work, would be custom shoes.

Wendy - I will eventually put together a list. Like you, I am busy. To make matters worse, I come home from work, quickly do what I really need to do, or totally abandon everything, then ignore my family to read the message boards or surf the Internet for something that can help and then work some more from home!

Re: Thanks for recommending ART

Matt L on 8/06/01 at 11:04 (055635)

Where exactly is the ART done for TTS? Did you fear that the aggressive massage could further compress the nerve?

Re: Julie G Re: Thanks for recommending ART

Donna SL on 8/06/01 at 12:34 (055639)

Hi Julie,

I am so happy to hear this. Thanks for letting me know. I'm going to show this to message to my chiropractor. You're the second person that I know of so far from this board that has confirmed that ART has helped them with TTS. I know some people were helped with PF, but this is really a thrill to hear it's helping another person with TTS. I know ART is excellent for nerve entrapment, but it's still great to hear when someone reports back with success.

I wish more people would try this.

Good luck with your continuing treatments.

P.S. Just curious. Can you give me an example of what stories scared you?

Donna

Re: Thanks for recommending ART

Donna SL on 8/06/01 at 12:48 (055641)

Matt,

ART is not aggressive massage. It's a special type of tissue manipulation, the frees the nerves of adhesions in fascia tissue, that are pressing on the nerves. The person performing this is usually a chiropractor who has intensive knowledge of nerve entrapment, and human anatomy. The purpose of ART is not to compress nerves, but to free them. I have posted extensively on this subject in April 01, and a small amount in the following months.

The Chiropractor works many areas of the lower extremities, along with the TT area.

Donna

Re: Thanks for recommending ART

Mike C. on 8/06/01 at hrmin (055643)

I've just been diagnosed with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome. What is ART? Where can I get some information on it and if it would be good for my condition? How can one compare or contrast it with the surgery alternative? I've heard that surgery to alleviate this condition is very problematic and doesn't work many times.

I'd appreciate someone sharing there experience and knowledge in this area with me.

Re: Thanks for recommending ART

wendyn on 8/06/01 at 20:35 (055706)

Julie - I am sorry some of the stories have scared you...I don't think that would ever be the intention of anyone!

Keep in mind that all the situations are different, and just because one person has a particular situation - it doesn't mean it will be the same (or as bad?)for you.

Re: ART is Active Release Techniques® & A question for Scott & Wendy

Janette on 8/06/01 at 23:35 (055723)

It took me too much time researching information on ART previously posted on the message board. So for the others who don't have time to sort through all the postings and want the info here it is. My impression of ART, from reading the entries in the message board is that it is very painful but people with PF have seen results. The entries go all the way back to 1999 and it was hard to tell if it was successful with TTS, but for me it would be worth a try.

ART Description:
The Active Release Techniques® (also know as ART®) Soft-Tissue Management System is a new and
highly successful approach to injuries of muscles, tendons, fascia, nerves, and the surrounding soft
tissues.

Here is the Web site for P. Michael Leahy, DC

http://www.activerelease.com

Scott, can we have a glossary, index or an update to Wendy's FAQs. I have spent lots of time searching the message boards and if you don't stay current on reading every entry, you can certainly miss some facts. It could even be some type of page, 'What works for some people' and 'What doesn't work'. I really think that Wendy could write a book on TTS from the information that she gives on the message board. Janette

Re: ART is Active Release Techniques® & A question for Scott & Wendy

wendyn on 8/06/01 at 23:49 (055724)

Janette - I'm off to bed - please email me at mailwendy1@home.com - perhaps we could collaborate on an update together and add some information (I've been miserably short on time lately to do a lot of things). You may be able to give some really good input into things that need to be added. You may also be able to light a much needed fire under my butt to get me to update it.

Re: ART is Active Release Techniques® & A question for Scott & Wendy

Donna SL on 8/07/01 at 01:49 (055727)

Janette,

ART shouldn't be painful if the technique is done properly. Most of the time, it actually feels quite good. Once in a while the chiropractor has to go a little deeper in certain areas, and it might hurt a little for around 15-20 seconds, but general it's not an unpleasant experience, and the person receiving the treatment should feel much relief after it's done.

Donna

Re: ART is Active Release Techniques® & A question for Scott & Wendy

Scott R on 8/07/01 at 07:40 (055735)

Janette, I'll publish whatever Wendy puts together.

Julie, thanks for reminding people of the birk website. Getting them a link somewhere eventhough they don't pay is one of those things on my neglected to do list.

Re: Birkenstock Outlet

Janette on 8/07/01 at 22:53 (055868)

Scott

Apart from ordering Birkenstocks from the German Birkenstock Web Site, there also is another alternative for some people. I found reference to the Birkenstock Outlet stores in the message boards. One was listed in Florida and another in California. I am in Arizona but had an upcoming conference in Florida. Birkenstocks have always been too narrow for my feet but I thought if there were an outlet shop close by, I would make it a point to check it out.

In Orlando I made a trip to the outlet shop and did pick up three pairs. They were all a slight bit narrow but for the price, I could afford to give them to throw them away if I really did not like them. The leather adjustable slide (I don't know the names as I left all the boxes in the hotel garbage) was $14.99 and I got two adjustable Betula's which I could use in water for $19.99 each.

It turned out the shop I was in was a 'temporary' Birkenstock outlet. The real outlet store was just down the road. Since I had come so far, I did check out the shop. The prices there were definitely higher but there was more variety. Also I was late and I had shoes! I had been reduced wearing:
- To work & outside the house: one pair of Ecco sandals and on a good day I may be able to put my foot in completely. I would just buy the exact same shoe when I needed another one. And it only comes in one color...
- Around the house & walking into the pool: a pair of Maseur sandals/slides
- Trying to exercise: Untied NB walking shoes for approximately 30 minutes or less, 3 x per week

I am alternating the Birkenstocks & Betula's around the house and walking into the pool. They are tight but they DO NOT cover the nerve.

I am actually working with a Pedorthist who is trying to find me something I can wear and not press on the nerve. I can stand/walk more in a foot covering that doesn't touch the nerve. Put a shoe and/or sock on and pain is nearly immediate. The 2nd step (if we still don't find the perfect shoe) will be to modify something I can wear now, eg my Ecco's, to miss touching the nerve. The 3rd step, if Step #2 does not work, would be custom shoes.

Wendy - I will eventually put together a list. Like you, I am busy. To make matters worse, I come home from work, quickly do what I really need to do, or totally abandon everything, then ignore my family to read the message boards or surf the Internet for something that can help and then work some more from home!