Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Hands Free Crutch

Posted by Ed Davis, DPM on 8/08/01 at hrmin (055927)

Scott:

Before the hands free crutch another product came about in which the leg is offloaded, held at a right angle but instead of a 'crutch' a platform with wheels on it is used. A couple companies started producing them.

I and my colleagues were a bit concerned that such devices may not be sufficiently safe as the wheeled device may be hard to control--it enables people to go fairly fast. The manufacturer asserted that they are NOT to be used as a scooter and that people need to be prudent---oh well.

I will track down the source and get more info. on the product if you are interested.
Ed

Re: Hands Free Crutch

Scott R on 8/08/01 at 16:49 (055956)

Dr. Ed, I'm always interested in seeing new and interesting products. Thanks for the information. Safety is a concern even with this device. We have some pretty hefty visitors (especially the women) and falling is a big deal for those over 200 lbs. Luckily, the device's short straps prevent people who weigh over 275 lbs from being able to use it. The inventor tells me guys love it more than gals. It's a mechanical thing.

Now don't somebody get mad at me about the weight comments. I'm just referring objectively to the survey results. Unless I were to really lie to you, this is, to a large extent, a website being visited by big women.

Re: platform on wheels

elliott on 8/08/01 at 17:13 (055963)

I saw that being used by a patient in my ortho's waiting room. If I recall, it cost around $25 per week to rent or $250 to buy. The ortho's office apparently offers it post-surgery to those who ask. If only I would've known: it sure would've come in handy those first two weeks when you can't put your foot down and have to crawl to the bathroom (often easier than struggling with crutches). And if you limit its usage to getting around inside the house, you're less likely to reach 50 mph. In the ortho's waiting room, everyone, including me, crowded around to ask the patient about it. The mother of the patient, a young schoolage girl attending school with it, said that the only problem is that it is so conspicuous that everyone crowds around to ask about it. I said to her, 'Oh really, I didn't even notice it.' :-) She laughed.

Re: Trying to picture what this looks like

Beverly on 8/09/01 at 13:42 (056038)

I hope I don't ever go back to crutches,but just for future reference, I'm trying to picture what this looks like. Not getting a clear visual. I had trouble with crutches because they were too hard on my neck and shoulder.
I'm slightly overweight (size 14) but not heavy; so I'd be an ok size for it.
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: picture an adjustable knee scooter

elliott on 8/09/01 at 13:59 (056047)

You place leg, knee/shin-side down, onto cushioned platform, the height of which is adjustable. Injured foot suspends over end, toes pointing downward. Below cushioned platform is a base with wheels. You hold on to a handle higher up, also adjustable, I believe, and scoot along by pushing off good foot on ground while knee and shin of bad foot remain on cushion.

I hate crutches too (which have plenty of risks of their own, let's not forget).

Re: on 4 wheels, that is (not 2)

elliott on 8/09/01 at 14:04 (056049)

.

Re: Hands Free Crutch

john h on 8/10/01 at 09:52 (056154)

when i was on crutches i ordered a crutch shock absorber that will attach to your aluminum crutches or you can order the crutches with shock absorbers built in. they take a significant amount of pressure off of your wrist probably, half of what the regular crutches provide. if you have weak wrist or just want to be more comfortable i woul sure recommend them. my orthopedic surgeon was particularly interested in them.

Re: Hands Free Crutch

Scott R on 8/08/01 at 16:49 (055956)

Dr. Ed, I'm always interested in seeing new and interesting products. Thanks for the information. Safety is a concern even with this device. We have some pretty hefty visitors (especially the women) and falling is a big deal for those over 200 lbs. Luckily, the device's short straps prevent people who weigh over 275 lbs from being able to use it. The inventor tells me guys love it more than gals. It's a mechanical thing.

Now don't somebody get mad at me about the weight comments. I'm just referring objectively to the survey results. Unless I were to really lie to you, this is, to a large extent, a website being visited by big women.

Re: platform on wheels

elliott on 8/08/01 at 17:13 (055963)

I saw that being used by a patient in my ortho's waiting room. If I recall, it cost around $25 per week to rent or $250 to buy. The ortho's office apparently offers it post-surgery to those who ask. If only I would've known: it sure would've come in handy those first two weeks when you can't put your foot down and have to crawl to the bathroom (often easier than struggling with crutches). And if you limit its usage to getting around inside the house, you're less likely to reach 50 mph. In the ortho's waiting room, everyone, including me, crowded around to ask the patient about it. The mother of the patient, a young schoolage girl attending school with it, said that the only problem is that it is so conspicuous that everyone crowds around to ask about it. I said to her, 'Oh really, I didn't even notice it.' :-) She laughed.

Re: Trying to picture what this looks like

Beverly on 8/09/01 at 13:42 (056038)

I hope I don't ever go back to crutches,but just for future reference, I'm trying to picture what this looks like. Not getting a clear visual. I had trouble with crutches because they were too hard on my neck and shoulder.
I'm slightly overweight (size 14) but not heavy; so I'd be an ok size for it.
Thanks,
Beverly

Re: picture an adjustable knee scooter

elliott on 8/09/01 at 13:59 (056047)

You place leg, knee/shin-side down, onto cushioned platform, the height of which is adjustable. Injured foot suspends over end, toes pointing downward. Below cushioned platform is a base with wheels. You hold on to a handle higher up, also adjustable, I believe, and scoot along by pushing off good foot on ground while knee and shin of bad foot remain on cushion.

I hate crutches too (which have plenty of risks of their own, let's not forget).

Re: on 4 wheels, that is (not 2)

elliott on 8/09/01 at 14:04 (056049)

.

Re: Hands Free Crutch

john h on 8/10/01 at 09:52 (056154)

when i was on crutches i ordered a crutch shock absorber that will attach to your aluminum crutches or you can order the crutches with shock absorbers built in. they take a significant amount of pressure off of your wrist probably, half of what the regular crutches provide. if you have weak wrist or just want to be more comfortable i woul sure recommend them. my orthopedic surgeon was particularly interested in them.