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Went to Podiatrist

Posted by Kathy R on 8/09/01 at 08:30 (056014)

I found a podiatrist, was seeing an Orthodpedic, who I didn't like. Orthopedic said he didn't see anything on the xray, and that I just had imflammation. Podiatrist clearly saw a heel spur. Anyway, I'm now on my 5th anti-inflammatory, had taping, and start wearing a night split. He also said that I've got a good chance of requiring surgery, because all of the conservative steps have failed. My question is after the night splint, what would be some other alternatives to surgery?

Re: Went to Podiatrist

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/09/01 at 14:09 (056051)

First of all how long have you had this heel pain/spur/plantar fasciitis condition. We have been using ESWT for chronic( longer then six months) in place of foot surgery. ESWT is a very interesting procedure and you can read about this on this web site or I e-mail heelhelp@bee.net for an ESWT packet that will describe and anwwer any questions you may have

Re: Went to Podiatrist

Paula G. on 8/10/01 at 09:09 (056145)

I had a cortizone shot that helped me for almost two months until I injured my foot. Sometimes that helps. Also, for some people orthotics have helped and wearing very good support shoes. Thing is you cannot go barefoot or wear cheap sandals, shoes, etc.
Have the anti-inflammatories worked? I know I keep going back to Alieve because they don't help me.
How long have you had this?

Re: Went to Podiatrist

LimpyNoMore on 8/10/01 at hrmin (056240)

Why can't you go barefoot? I was told by my chiropractor that's the best. Now I'm wondering about the doc's advice? Seems to me since I became flat footed with the onset of plantar fascia I should be wearing an arched shoe not flat or barefooted. What do you think?

Re: Went to Podiatrist

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/10/01 at hrmin (056247)

Most people with plantar fasciitis do better with a supportive shoe or shoes with orthotics than going barefoot.

A theoretical consideration (only theoretical)--If we went barefoot all our lives, staying off man-made hard surfaces, the muscles within the arches and bottoms of our feet would be well developed. Those 'intrinsic' muscles of the foot if strong enough would help support the fascia, releaving tension from it.
Ed

Re: B are feet

Julie on 8/11/01 at 02:06 (056281)

When you have plantar fasciitis, the injury to the fascia, where it has begun to pull away from its insertion point at the heelbone, causes your arch to lose some of the support that the fascia has normally given it (this is one of the functions of the fascia, which connects the heel and the ball of the foot). The arch needs that support, which now has to be given by good, stable shoes, possibly orthotics, possibly tape. If the support isn't given the arch will further collapse, putting more strain on the fascia's weak point.

It's good material for speculation that if we went barefoot all our lives the muscular structure of our feet would be so strong that PF would never happen, and it would be interesting to know if that is true in other culture. But we live in the culture we live in, and are vulnerable to all its ills, including PF.

Re: Bare feet - ps

Julie on 8/11/01 at 02:52 (056287)

I'll just add that after a year of following the 'no bare feet' rule, I have just in the last week or so begun to stand barefoot for short periods while teaching and demonstrating in my yoga classes. And I have noticed the difference: mild pain the next day.

Re: Went to Podiatrist

Kathy R on 8/13/01 at 07:11 (056534)

I've had this for about 1 year now, and have had cortisone, and I am on my 5th anti-inflammatory. The cortisone didn't work, and the anti-inflammatories are not working either. Now, I have having pain behind my heel.

Re: Went to Podiatrist

Kathy R on 8/13/01 at 07:12 (056535)

I've had this condition for about 1 year, and also have had cortisone injection, with no luck. I'm on my 5th anti-imflammatory, which isn't working either.

Re: Went to Podiatrist

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/09/01 at 14:09 (056051)

First of all how long have you had this heel pain/spur/plantar fasciitis condition. We have been using ESWT for chronic( longer then six months) in place of foot surgery. ESWT is a very interesting procedure and you can read about this on this web site or I e-mail heelhelp@bee.net for an ESWT packet that will describe and anwwer any questions you may have

Re: Went to Podiatrist

Paula G. on 8/10/01 at 09:09 (056145)

I had a cortizone shot that helped me for almost two months until I injured my foot. Sometimes that helps. Also, for some people orthotics have helped and wearing very good support shoes. Thing is you cannot go barefoot or wear cheap sandals, shoes, etc.
Have the anti-inflammatories worked? I know I keep going back to Alieve because they don't help me.
How long have you had this?

Re: Went to Podiatrist

LimpyNoMore on 8/10/01 at hrmin (056240)

Why can't you go barefoot? I was told by my chiropractor that's the best. Now I'm wondering about the doc's advice? Seems to me since I became flat footed with the onset of plantar fascia I should be wearing an arched shoe not flat or barefooted. What do you think?

Re: Went to Podiatrist

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/10/01 at hrmin (056247)

Most people with plantar fasciitis do better with a supportive shoe or shoes with orthotics than going barefoot.

A theoretical consideration (only theoretical)--If we went barefoot all our lives, staying off man-made hard surfaces, the muscles within the arches and bottoms of our feet would be well developed. Those 'intrinsic' muscles of the foot if strong enough would help support the fascia, releaving tension from it.
Ed

Re: B are feet

Julie on 8/11/01 at 02:06 (056281)

When you have plantar fasciitis, the injury to the fascia, where it has begun to pull away from its insertion point at the heelbone, causes your arch to lose some of the support that the fascia has normally given it (this is one of the functions of the fascia, which connects the heel and the ball of the foot). The arch needs that support, which now has to be given by good, stable shoes, possibly orthotics, possibly tape. If the support isn't given the arch will further collapse, putting more strain on the fascia's weak point.

It's good material for speculation that if we went barefoot all our lives the muscular structure of our feet would be so strong that PF would never happen, and it would be interesting to know if that is true in other culture. But we live in the culture we live in, and are vulnerable to all its ills, including PF.

Re: Bare feet - ps

Julie on 8/11/01 at 02:52 (056287)

I'll just add that after a year of following the 'no bare feet' rule, I have just in the last week or so begun to stand barefoot for short periods while teaching and demonstrating in my yoga classes. And I have noticed the difference: mild pain the next day.

Re: Went to Podiatrist

Kathy R on 8/13/01 at 07:11 (056534)

I've had this for about 1 year now, and have had cortisone, and I am on my 5th anti-inflammatory. The cortisone didn't work, and the anti-inflammatories are not working either. Now, I have having pain behind my heel.

Re: Went to Podiatrist

Kathy R on 8/13/01 at 07:12 (056535)

I've had this condition for about 1 year, and also have had cortisone injection, with no luck. I'm on my 5th anti-imflammatory, which isn't working either.