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Biking and heel pain

Posted by Elizabeth G on 8/20/01 at 14:23 (057287)

I first experienced pains in my right heel about 10 years ago when I was about 22. At the time I did not see a doctor but instead bought some heel cushions and did some stretches. The pain eventually went away.

About 5 years ago I severely sprained my ankle, both sides of the ankle were injured. To rule out the possibility of a broken ankle, an x-ray was taken. The doctor told me that the ankle wasn't broken but he did point out that I had a heel spur. Since I no longer had any pain, he said I shouldn't worry about it. My ankle was never the same after that and I've had some problems with it since then but nothing major.

This summer I've been doing alot of bike riding. A couple of weeks ago my heel started hurting again. I'm assuming that it's due to the biking and the position of my foot on the pedal. I had been wearing sandals while I was riding but I've since switched to tennis shoes. It's been about a week and things are getting worse if anything (mileage is increased each week). My pedals have toe straps on them. I'm wondering if it would be of any help to get the clipless pedals and a pair of biking shoes. I really don't want to stop biking because I'm in training for a bike ride at the end of September.

Thanks,
ELizabeth

Re: Biking and heel pain

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/20/01 at 15:11 (057297)

You want to bike with biking shoes or any shoes with a rigid shank. Watch your seat height--higher is somewhat better than lower. Also, if possible try to pedal with the center portion of your foot---you will loose some leverage but place less strain on the plantar fascia.
Ed

Re: Biking and heel pain

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/20/01 at 15:11 (057297)

You want to bike with biking shoes or any shoes with a rigid shank. Watch your seat height--higher is somewhat better than lower. Also, if possible try to pedal with the center portion of your foot---you will loose some leverage but place less strain on the plantar fascia.
Ed