Home The Book Dr Articles Products Message Boards Journal Articles Search Our Surveys Surgery ESWT Dr Messages Find Good Drs video

Dr-a little advice would be great

Posted by Denise on 8/24/01 at 17:54 (057862)

I was diagnosed with PF several years ago and used many of the treatments described on your site under the direction of a podiatrist. I discoveredBirkenstock shoes and they saved my life! ( I have very flat feet) I also have custom orthotics. The problem I am having is that the athletic shoes that were comfortable and that accomodated my orthotics have worn out and they no longer make the style. ( I bought the last 5 pairs several years ago that I could get my hands on) My podiatrist suggested New Balance but I find that they are cut too deep and while the orthotic fits comfortably they rub on the sides of my ankle bone. I am a very active person and want to continue to participate in my fitness program. If I do not wear the orthotic at all but just use a good work out shoe I have heel aches. As it is I can't even wear my orthotics in shoes for more than 2 or 3 days in a row or my heels begin to hurt again. Only myBirkenstocks seem to help my feet but unfortunately they do not make a fitness shoe and their insoles don't fit me correctly. Help I am very frustrated and thinking that I will have this forever. Many of the new fitness shoes have air technology or gel soles, the physical therapist I was seeing told me to avoid those as they defeated the purpose of my orthotic, the podiatrist told me to get a rigid shoe. What do you recommend? Thank you.

Re: Dr-a little advice would be great

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/24/01 at 19:52 (057876)

The deepness of the New Balance shoe may be helped by placing an insole over or under the orthotic to lift your foot up a bit---so that the ankle bone can clear the counter of the shoe.

The shoe can increase or decrease the effect of the orthotics up or down 25% (total of 50%). If you need a good anti-pronation running shoe consider: Brooks Ariel, Brooks Addiction 4, ASICS Gel MC Plus, New Balance 1121---these shoes will augment the support from the orthotics.

Nike and Reebok tend to make very soft shoes which may decrease the effect of the orthotics.

Perhaps your orthotics need to be re-evaluated too as your prescription may have changed a bit. Occasionally we need to tailor orthotics to one's sports. Running and walking involve fore and aft motion without much side to side motion---a firmer orthotic tends to be better. Lateral motion sports such as tennis, squash, racquetball tend to require softer orthotics which allow more subtalar joint motion (side to side).
Ed

Re: Dr-a little advice would be great

Denise on 8/25/01 at 06:17 (057900)

Thank you for answering my note!( and so quickly). What type of insole would I try putting in my New Balance shoes? The insole that is in the shoe is too high to place my orthotic on top of. I have tried this and it crowds the end of my foot into the top of the shoe. I will look for the other shoes that you suggested as well. So I do in fact want a firm shoe. Does that include the bottom of the shoe? I did read in the articles on the website that the shoe should bend at the ball of the feet before the toes. What about the air technology shoes and gel shoes? Thank you.

Re: Dr-a little advice would be great

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/25/01 at 13:39 (057936)

I do not know how high your foot needs to be lifted to clear the counter so it is hard to recommend a specific brand of insole. If you were in my office I would take a measurement and dispense the correct thickness--perhaps your pod can do that for you or you can do so via trial and error.
Also--it may not be necessary to use a full length insole if the problem is at your ankle---perhaps, if you don't mind sacrificing your current ones, cut them down so they end in the arch and act a bit more like a heel lift.
Ed

Re: Dr-a little advice would be great

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/24/01 at 19:52 (057876)

The deepness of the New Balance shoe may be helped by placing an insole over or under the orthotic to lift your foot up a bit---so that the ankle bone can clear the counter of the shoe.

The shoe can increase or decrease the effect of the orthotics up or down 25% (total of 50%). If you need a good anti-pronation running shoe consider: Brooks Ariel, Brooks Addiction 4, ASICS Gel MC Plus, New Balance 1121---these shoes will augment the support from the orthotics.

Nike and Reebok tend to make very soft shoes which may decrease the effect of the orthotics.

Perhaps your orthotics need to be re-evaluated too as your prescription may have changed a bit. Occasionally we need to tailor orthotics to one's sports. Running and walking involve fore and aft motion without much side to side motion---a firmer orthotic tends to be better. Lateral motion sports such as tennis, squash, racquetball tend to require softer orthotics which allow more subtalar joint motion (side to side).
Ed

Re: Dr-a little advice would be great

Denise on 8/25/01 at 06:17 (057900)

Thank you for answering my note!( and so quickly). What type of insole would I try putting in my New Balance shoes? The insole that is in the shoe is too high to place my orthotic on top of. I have tried this and it crowds the end of my foot into the top of the shoe. I will look for the other shoes that you suggested as well. So I do in fact want a firm shoe. Does that include the bottom of the shoe? I did read in the articles on the website that the shoe should bend at the ball of the feet before the toes. What about the air technology shoes and gel shoes? Thank you.

Re: Dr-a little advice would be great

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/25/01 at 13:39 (057936)

I do not know how high your foot needs to be lifted to clear the counter so it is hard to recommend a specific brand of insole. If you were in my office I would take a measurement and dispense the correct thickness--perhaps your pod can do that for you or you can do so via trial and error.
Also--it may not be necessary to use a full length insole if the problem is at your ankle---perhaps, if you don't mind sacrificing your current ones, cut them down so they end in the arch and act a bit more like a heel lift.
Ed