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Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Posted by Justin Z on 8/25/01 at 01:26 (057894)

I am a 20 year-old runner who has logged 30 miles a week until 6 months ago. Since then, despite a drastic cut back in the volume and intensity of my workouts as well as extended periods of rest, I have experienced 3 recurrances of TTS. Yes, a bone and joint surgeon did indeed confirm this diagnosis. My Primary Care Physician suggested that I may be forced to quit running since the pain returned in spite of arch supports and anti- inflammatory medicine. However, the Bone and Joint Surgeon has perscribed custom-made orthotics and Feldene for the pain. He also suggested surgery as a last resort, but did not recommend a cortizone injection.
My only concern is whether or not I will ever be able to return to my previous training schedule or at the very least, be able to run pain-free at some point?
If this proves to be a strong possibilty, what is the best course of action for me to be healthy enough to try out for my school team next season, which will be my senior year?

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

cindyp on 8/25/01 at 08:19 (057902)

my only question is how you can run? When I was suffering I could barely walk. Now that I've had surgery I know that I will never run again. If I sprain or twist the ankle I am back in the same boat or almost as before.I am not a dr. but I would say it may be a good long while.

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Justin Z on 8/25/01 at 10:58 (057917)

My case must simply be milder than yours. I am relatively pain-free when I walk, but the nerve remains sore to the touch. I have not attempted to run since the pain returned 5 weeks ago because it has worsened when I tried to train through it before.

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/25/01 at 13:49 (057941)

I would look carefully at possible biomechanical contribution to your problem.
Ed

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Sue M on 8/25/01 at 16:07 (057953)

i would like to talk to some one with Taral Tunnel syndrome

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Chris M on 8/25/01 at 16:56 (057958)

Hi. I thought I would share my experience with this. When TTS hit me I was training 5 mile a day. Same as you'd I'd rest and then try again with no luck. I got hard sole orthotics and cortisone and only could train at 2 mile a day. But I wasn't too bad, mild (tolerable) pain. I must tell you that I wouldn't recommend cortisone as you probably know, it can break down soft tissue.

Please read: I was always analyzed for pronation while barefoot. Didn't really exist. Running shoes were making me severely pronate. SOunds weird, but the orthopedic surgeon figured it out. Have someone watch you walk, jog,etc. in sneakers. I was using a Big name brand that is marketted to runners, I now faithfully use New Balance with roll bars in them, that will not allow the feet to tilt. You must realize all the pressure you are putting on your feet with every running stride

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Chris M on 8/25/01 at 16:58 (057960)

I will talk to you. I have it. I hate it. It is ruining my life Sound like your life? What are you wanting to talk about?

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Justin Z on 8/25/01 at 18:32 (057971)

To Chris M:
I HATE IT TOO !!! Yes, your life sounds very similar to mine. The s
Message Number 57976
Re: Dr-a little advice would be great View Thread
Posted by denise on 8/25/01 at 19:13

Thank you again for the advice. It is so great of you to take the time to answer a concern. I'll try several of these things and see my podiatrist again if I need to. Appreciate the answer to my questions as we don't have a podiatrist here in my town but one that comes in every other week from a nearby city. It is very difficult to get an appointment. Thanks again for your help!

Re: Justin, FYI the orthotics take a little while

Chris M on 8/26/01 at 07:59 (058001)

Hey Justin:
Your last post is cut off on the message board. I gather you do not have orthotics yet. I don't want you to be alarmed (as I was) when you first get them and try to use them they make your TTS and legs hurt. The first day was only on one hour and couldn't wait to get them off my feet. By one month I used them continuously. I called the doctor twice because I thought the orthotics were making me worse!

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

elliott on 8/26/01 at 21:30 (058058)

Ex-runner here, typically 35 miles a week. Still not over the emotional hurdle of not having returned (it's been 10 months since my last run).

In some ways you're lucky. You're not yet in terrible pain when you're not running, at which point you might be forced to consider surgery and may still not get relief. Runners are considered a harder breed to handle because the exact cause of the TTS and how to attempt to cure it is not clear. Biomechanical problems such as overpronation are thought likely, hence the try at orthotics. Be prepared for it to take some time even if it works. I'm suspicious that some runners with TTS tend to stretch their nerve as opposed to just getting it entrapped, and you can't unstretch a too-stretched nerve (so you could end up with a neurological problem that won't correct). In my own case, tortuous veins were observed bilaterally, and while my injuries were clearly running-induced, I have not seen any literature to suggest how likely it is that running causes veins to enlarge and entrap the nerve.

Could you please describe your exact symptoms (what, where, when)? It might help us help. I take it you did not have a nerve conduction test.

I found that taking even months off did not do a thing to get rid of my TTS. Out of curiosity, do you have a high, low, or medium arch? Any irregular gait or shoe wear? Assuming you do have a milder form of TTS and are not going to give up running, for starters, if I were you, I would immediately change your running shoes to ones with more control. That is, if you're using cushioned-class shoes, switch at least to stability; if stability, switch to motion control. (I would try this even before orthotics, as orthotics, while worth a shot, can have problems of their own.) What is the brand name and model of shoe you are running in?

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

cindyp on 8/25/01 at 08:19 (057902)

my only question is how you can run? When I was suffering I could barely walk. Now that I've had surgery I know that I will never run again. If I sprain or twist the ankle I am back in the same boat or almost as before.I am not a dr. but I would say it may be a good long while.

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Justin Z on 8/25/01 at 10:58 (057917)

My case must simply be milder than yours. I am relatively pain-free when I walk, but the nerve remains sore to the touch. I have not attempted to run since the pain returned 5 weeks ago because it has worsened when I tried to train through it before.

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/25/01 at 13:49 (057941)

I would look carefully at possible biomechanical contribution to your problem.
Ed

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Sue M on 8/25/01 at 16:07 (057953)

i would like to talk to some one with Taral Tunnel syndrome

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Chris M on 8/25/01 at 16:56 (057958)

Hi. I thought I would share my experience with this. When TTS hit me I was training 5 mile a day. Same as you'd I'd rest and then try again with no luck. I got hard sole orthotics and cortisone and only could train at 2 mile a day. But I wasn't too bad, mild (tolerable) pain. I must tell you that I wouldn't recommend cortisone as you probably know, it can break down soft tissue.

Please read: I was always analyzed for pronation while barefoot. Didn't really exist. Running shoes were making me severely pronate. SOunds weird, but the orthopedic surgeon figured it out. Have someone watch you walk, jog,etc. in sneakers. I was using a Big name brand that is marketted to runners, I now faithfully use New Balance with roll bars in them, that will not allow the feet to tilt. You must realize all the pressure you are putting on your feet with every running stride

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Chris M on 8/25/01 at 16:58 (057960)

I will talk to you. I have it. I hate it. It is ruining my life Sound like your life? What are you wanting to talk about?

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Justin Z on 8/25/01 at 18:32 (057971)

To Chris M:
I HATE IT TOO !!! Yes, your life sounds very similar to mine. The s
Message Number 57976
Re: Dr-a little advice would be great View Thread
Posted by denise on 8/25/01 at 19:13

Thank you again for the advice. It is so great of you to take the time to answer a concern. I'll try several of these things and see my podiatrist again if I need to. Appreciate the answer to my questions as we don't have a podiatrist here in my town but one that comes in every other week from a nearby city. It is very difficult to get an appointment. Thanks again for your help!

Re: Justin, FYI the orthotics take a little while

Chris M on 8/26/01 at 07:59 (058001)

Hey Justin:
Your last post is cut off on the message board. I gather you do not have orthotics yet. I don't want you to be alarmed (as I was) when you first get them and try to use them they make your TTS and legs hurt. The first day was only on one hour and couldn't wait to get them off my feet. By one month I used them continuously. I called the doctor twice because I thought the orthotics were making me worse!

Re: Running with Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

elliott on 8/26/01 at 21:30 (058058)

Ex-runner here, typically 35 miles a week. Still not over the emotional hurdle of not having returned (it's been 10 months since my last run).

In some ways you're lucky. You're not yet in terrible pain when you're not running, at which point you might be forced to consider surgery and may still not get relief. Runners are considered a harder breed to handle because the exact cause of the TTS and how to attempt to cure it is not clear. Biomechanical problems such as overpronation are thought likely, hence the try at orthotics. Be prepared for it to take some time even if it works. I'm suspicious that some runners with TTS tend to stretch their nerve as opposed to just getting it entrapped, and you can't unstretch a too-stretched nerve (so you could end up with a neurological problem that won't correct). In my own case, tortuous veins were observed bilaterally, and while my injuries were clearly running-induced, I have not seen any literature to suggest how likely it is that running causes veins to enlarge and entrap the nerve.

Could you please describe your exact symptoms (what, where, when)? It might help us help. I take it you did not have a nerve conduction test.

I found that taking even months off did not do a thing to get rid of my TTS. Out of curiosity, do you have a high, low, or medium arch? Any irregular gait or shoe wear? Assuming you do have a milder form of TTS and are not going to give up running, for starters, if I were you, I would immediately change your running shoes to ones with more control. That is, if you're using cushioned-class shoes, switch at least to stability; if stability, switch to motion control. (I would try this even before orthotics, as orthotics, while worth a shot, can have problems of their own.) What is the brand name and model of shoe you are running in?