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Heel spurs on back of heels

Posted by Pam D on 8/28/01 at 00:51 (058195)

I am having trouble finding any information on heel spurs on the back of heels. I have spurs on the bottom of my heels also. The ones that are giving me trouble are the ones that are on the back of my heels. They have caused me to have tendonitis. I am presently doing physical therapy and home stretches. The physical therapists also gave me pool exercises to do and I think they are helping a lot. I will be going back to my podiatirist soon. He initially mentioned surgery but I am dinding out through research that is not the route I want to take. Is there somewhere I can go to find information on heel spurs on the back of my heels and what I might do for them? I will do anything to get rid of this pain. I am not used to being inactive and this is the point I am getting to. I would appreciate any information you could give me.

Re: Heel spurs on back of heels

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/28/01 at 13:40 (058234)

The location of the 'spur' on back of your heel is important. The most significant pain usually is from AICT, achilles insertional calcific tendinitis. The enthesis, which is the area in which the achilles attaches to the back of the heel bone (bone-tendon interface) is chronically inflamed and eventually calcifies. Such patients usually have tight achilles tendons and often have rearfoot varus (tilt of heel bone).

Successful treatment must include modalities such as night splints which can lengthen the achilles. The beauty of the product on this site, N'Ice and Stretch is the soft ice pad that hits right on the 'spur,' that is, where the achilles meets the back of the heel bone. The rearfoot varus needs to be treated utilizing an orthotic with a post or wedge in the rearfoot. Many cases do go on to surgery. The achilles tendon needs to be peeled of the back of the heel bone in order to completely 'clean' the calcification off.
Ed

Re: Heel spurs on back of heels

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/28/01 at 14:17 (058240)

We have used ESWT for chronic pain due to insertional achilles tendonitis
with calcification. Does help to avoid the long and painful recovery time
that is required with the surgery for this condition

Re: Heel spurs on back of heels

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/28/01 at 14:43 (058246)

It sounds like ESWT may be an excellent option for AICT. It is important to distinguish AICT from Haglund's deformity so an accurate diagnosis is important.
Ed

Re: Heel spurs on back of heels

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/28/01 at 13:40 (058234)

The location of the 'spur' on back of your heel is important. The most significant pain usually is from AICT, achilles insertional calcific tendinitis. The enthesis, which is the area in which the achilles attaches to the back of the heel bone (bone-tendon interface) is chronically inflamed and eventually calcifies. Such patients usually have tight achilles tendons and often have rearfoot varus (tilt of heel bone).

Successful treatment must include modalities such as night splints which can lengthen the achilles. The beauty of the product on this site, N'Ice and Stretch is the soft ice pad that hits right on the 'spur,' that is, where the achilles meets the back of the heel bone. The rearfoot varus needs to be treated utilizing an orthotic with a post or wedge in the rearfoot. Many cases do go on to surgery. The achilles tendon needs to be peeled of the back of the heel bone in order to completely 'clean' the calcification off.
Ed

Re: Heel spurs on back of heels

Dr. Zuckerman on 8/28/01 at 14:17 (058240)

We have used ESWT for chronic pain due to insertional achilles tendonitis
with calcification. Does help to avoid the long and painful recovery time
that is required with the surgery for this condition

Re: Heel spurs on back of heels

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/28/01 at 14:43 (058246)

It sounds like ESWT may be an excellent option for AICT. It is important to distinguish AICT from Haglund's deformity so an accurate diagnosis is important.
Ed