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inserts

Posted by b_kinman on 8/30/01 at 08:49 (058435)

I have a call in to my dr. to prescribe me a custom cork insert for my shoes. After insurance, they will cost me arount $50. Do you think I should go through with this, or just get the PowerStep inserts I can get for around $30. I may have to see the dr. which will be an addt'l $20 co-pay. I have plantar fasciitis. It is not causing me much problems right now. Up until I had to start wearing maternity clothes, I could wear scrubs and my tennis shoes and didn't have any problems. Now that I have to wear my maternity clothes, I have been wearing dress shoes (rockport). At first they were ok (couldnt' wear them about 1/1/2 yrs ago, because of my pf - when it was at it's worst). But now my heels are starting to bother me again and I am getting the leg cramps. Just wanted some opinions.

Re: inserts

Richard, C.Ped on 8/30/01 at 09:00 (058437)

So the plantar fasciitis has actually been diagnosed...right? Have you ever worn custom orthotics before? What type of foot do you have...low arch, high arch, normal arch?

If you only have to pay $50 after insurance pays..I would suggest having the orthotics made. Of course, wether or not they work comes down to who makes them...yada, yada, yada (see below for the ethics posts). If you are in the medical field and are able to wear scrubs, you can get maternity scrubs...my wife is a nurse and just had a baby. Or if not avaliabe..just get larger pants and shirt.

If you are on your feet all day, you would benefit from the support of the orthotics. My wife told me how much hers helped when she was pregnant. Just make sure they are properly interfaced with your shoe.

Richard, c.Ped

Re: inserts - Ans to questions

b_kinman on 8/30/01 at 16:15 (058503)

I was diagnosed with p.f. by an orthopedic dr., the one who did my back surgery. He did no testing, just told me I had it and gave me cortisone injections.

I have never worn customs before. The only thing the dr. told me to get (he gave a prescription) was some gel heel pads, which did help, but don't work well with my dress shoes.

I have low almost no arches.

I do work at a hospital, but in the Information Systems dept., so I am not on my feet all day, quite the contrary, I am on my butt all day! :-)

I chose to buy casual dress Maternity clothes so I would have something to wear outside work. We wear casual dress if not scrubs in my dept. My feet were doing better and I had worn my rockports a few times and had good success. But now I am wearing them every day. I would wear my Avia's with them outside of work, but we can only wear tennis shoes if we wear scrubs.

What do you mean by properly interfaced with your shoe?

Thank you for your response. As you can tell, this dr. is not very informative, and I have not seen him in about 2 years.

Re: inserts - Ans to questions

Richard, C.Ped on 8/31/01 at 08:57 (058568)

Interfacing an orthosis with the shoe is very important. this means that the orthosis sits flat inside the shoe. An orthosis that is not properly interfaced will cup inward on the sides, and is pretty uncomfortable. Also, if not interfaced, the shoes that have a slight build up in the arch will not allow the orthosis to properly do its job. There will be to much material, thus pushing your arch into over correction.

My wife loves her Avia's. Her orthosis fits perfectly inside the shoe.

I don't have to much of a problem with gel pads..but I think of them more as a band-aid rather than corrective treatment.

Have you asked if you could wear your athletic shoes with dress clothes due to the problem? You might be able to find a good casual shoe that the orthosis will fit into.

As for cork...well, that is not my favorite..but others like it. In my opinion and mine only, I would not go with a hard plastic device. That would be painful with low to almost no arches. I am a huge fan of EVA. It is very dense and will hold up under pressure, but also gives to allow cushion. To each his own...

Good luck!
Richard

Re: inserts

Richard, C.Ped on 8/30/01 at 09:00 (058437)

So the plantar fasciitis has actually been diagnosed...right? Have you ever worn custom orthotics before? What type of foot do you have...low arch, high arch, normal arch?

If you only have to pay $50 after insurance pays..I would suggest having the orthotics made. Of course, wether or not they work comes down to who makes them...yada, yada, yada (see below for the ethics posts). If you are in the medical field and are able to wear scrubs, you can get maternity scrubs...my wife is a nurse and just had a baby. Or if not avaliabe..just get larger pants and shirt.

If you are on your feet all day, you would benefit from the support of the orthotics. My wife told me how much hers helped when she was pregnant. Just make sure they are properly interfaced with your shoe.

Richard, c.Ped

Re: inserts - Ans to questions

b_kinman on 8/30/01 at 16:15 (058503)

I was diagnosed with p.f. by an orthopedic dr., the one who did my back surgery. He did no testing, just told me I had it and gave me cortisone injections.

I have never worn customs before. The only thing the dr. told me to get (he gave a prescription) was some gel heel pads, which did help, but don't work well with my dress shoes.

I have low almost no arches.

I do work at a hospital, but in the Information Systems dept., so I am not on my feet all day, quite the contrary, I am on my butt all day! :-)

I chose to buy casual dress Maternity clothes so I would have something to wear outside work. We wear casual dress if not scrubs in my dept. My feet were doing better and I had worn my rockports a few times and had good success. But now I am wearing them every day. I would wear my Avia's with them outside of work, but we can only wear tennis shoes if we wear scrubs.

What do you mean by properly interfaced with your shoe?

Thank you for your response. As you can tell, this dr. is not very informative, and I have not seen him in about 2 years.

Re: inserts - Ans to questions

Richard, C.Ped on 8/31/01 at 08:57 (058568)

Interfacing an orthosis with the shoe is very important. this means that the orthosis sits flat inside the shoe. An orthosis that is not properly interfaced will cup inward on the sides, and is pretty uncomfortable. Also, if not interfaced, the shoes that have a slight build up in the arch will not allow the orthosis to properly do its job. There will be to much material, thus pushing your arch into over correction.

My wife loves her Avia's. Her orthosis fits perfectly inside the shoe.

I don't have to much of a problem with gel pads..but I think of them more as a band-aid rather than corrective treatment.

Have you asked if you could wear your athletic shoes with dress clothes due to the problem? You might be able to find a good casual shoe that the orthosis will fit into.

As for cork...well, that is not my favorite..but others like it. In my opinion and mine only, I would not go with a hard plastic device. That would be painful with low to almost no arches. I am a huge fan of EVA. It is very dense and will hold up under pressure, but also gives to allow cushion. To each his own...

Good luck!
Richard