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Foot question

Posted by D.Thomas on 8/30/01 at 14:35 (058494)

I just got back from the doc and he told me something that I hadn't heard before. I was trying to ask him what he thought was the main problem with my feet. He said that my ankle follows my forefoot and that normal feet are the other way around. He also said that I do not pronate, I'm opposite of that. Which from what I understand is I walk on the outside (lateral) part of my feet. How the hell does my ankle follow my forefoot and I walk on the outside? This doesn't seem physically possible. Wow, I must walk like a duck.

Re: Foot question

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/30/01 at 16:36 (058505)

I have to do some guessing based on the available information. If your forefoot is in valgus, that is, it is tilted with an inward twist compared to the heel, and if that valgus position is somewhat rigid, the following sequence of events occurs: you come down on the outside of the heel first(everyone does) then the subtalar joint pronates--which allows the forefoot to be lowered toward the ground. The first metatarsal head(area behind the big toe) hits first followed by the rest of the forefoot. Allowing me some descriptive freedom here--after the first metatarsal head hits, it causes the forefoot to rock outward. That outward rock is known as a 'supinatory rock.' The supinatory rock is powerful enough to tip the subtalar joint outward (supination). Once the subtalar joint is maximally supinated, the momentum of the supinatory rock is carried into the ankle joint potentially throwing it outward and occasionally preciptitating a sprain.
Ed

Re: Foot question

D.Thomas on 8/30/01 at 17:09 (058510)

Actually this sounds pretty close. I will have to print it out and give it to him to see if this is close and have him write any changes to know exactly what I do. If this is the case, what part is causing stress on the medial part of the fascia and is it any complex fix with orthotics? He did mention something about what my foot is doing creates alot of stress on the medial part of the fascia and it didn't surprise him I had the pain there.

He also taped both my feet pretty well and it really helps stablize the heel. I have always felt wiggly when running like I don't any balance.

Re: Foot question

Ed Davis, DPM on 8/30/01 at 16:36 (058505)

I have to do some guessing based on the available information. If your forefoot is in valgus, that is, it is tilted with an inward twist compared to the heel, and if that valgus position is somewhat rigid, the following sequence of events occurs: you come down on the outside of the heel first(everyone does) then the subtalar joint pronates--which allows the forefoot to be lowered toward the ground. The first metatarsal head(area behind the big toe) hits first followed by the rest of the forefoot. Allowing me some descriptive freedom here--after the first metatarsal head hits, it causes the forefoot to rock outward. That outward rock is known as a 'supinatory rock.' The supinatory rock is powerful enough to tip the subtalar joint outward (supination). Once the subtalar joint is maximally supinated, the momentum of the supinatory rock is carried into the ankle joint potentially throwing it outward and occasionally preciptitating a sprain.
Ed

Re: Foot question

D.Thomas on 8/30/01 at 17:09 (058510)

Actually this sounds pretty close. I will have to print it out and give it to him to see if this is close and have him write any changes to know exactly what I do. If this is the case, what part is causing stress on the medial part of the fascia and is it any complex fix with orthotics? He did mention something about what my foot is doing creates alot of stress on the medial part of the fascia and it didn't surprise him I had the pain there.

He also taped both my feet pretty well and it really helps stablize the heel. I have always felt wiggly when running like I don't any balance.