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Running or Walking Shoes

Posted by adam p on 9/05/01 at 11:48 (059104)

Even though these shoes are not designed for lateral, or side-to-side movement, I would greatly appreciate the readers' opinion about those makes which 'resist lateral displacement of the uppers (in relation to the sole)' the most.

Thanks in advance.

P.S. Anyone found high-tops with the cut at the top of the upper being higher
higher at the and almost like a low-cut at the back to be better?

AP

Re: Running or Walking Shoes

elliott on 9/05/01 at 12:30 (059110)

I know a lot about running shoes from my running days. I have seen the shoe editor of Runner's World (Bob Wischnia, or Wish for short) say that walking shoes do not really offer anything over running shoes. Many running shoes have a bit of a lift in the rear, which you may prefer.

The two running shoes that come to mind meeting your criteria are the Brooks Beast and the New Balance 587 (the Crusher!). More generally, you want the class of running shoes called motion control shoes, which control overpronation (inward roll of your foot). They are heavier and firmer than other running shoes. You want one with a stiff heel counter. Fit is important, so don't limit yourself to just these two. You may want to visit the runnersworld.com web site and read the reviews of the motion control shoes. You can also pose a question to Wish who will answer if he is in town. RW reviews shoes quarterly in its magazine, with most reviews reproduced, with delay, on its web site.

In earlier posts you said you wear orthotics. The RW reviews usually say which shoes fit good with orthotics. Depending on the shoe's fit, you may find it more comfortable to either remove the shoe insole altogether to make room for your orthotics, or to cut the insole so that just the forward part is left in and meets up with the 3/4 length orthotics, if that's what you have.

Re: Running or Walking Shoes - laterally stable shoes

Donna SL on 9/06/01 at 01:07 (059182)

Hi Adam,

If I understand you correctly it seems like you are looking for a shoe that is laterally stable. I'm always searching for shoes like that, because my feet roll out, and need lateral stability. If that is the case with you stay away from any motion control shoe like the Brooks Beast, New Balance, etc., or any shoe in general that has a dual density medial piece on the inside part of the shoe. These are anti-pronation shoes, and will cause even more lateral instability. You need a good firm neutral firm shoe.

A large majority of the athletic shoes are too soft on the lateral side, except for some cross-trainers, basketball shoes, tennis shoes, etc. Most of them have some extra lateral support to keep the ankle from going out. Most running shoes have no lateral stability. Be careful though, because some walking,and cross training shoes have anti-pronation devices on them too. Usually you can tell because they have a dark gray material, or plastic piece on the inside of the arch, and/or heel area. Stay away from these.

Also, look at non-traditional athletic shoes made from manufacturers that had only made hiking type boots in the past. They have been producing what's called multi sport all purpose shoes that can be used for light hiking, walking, etc., and have great support, and are very well made. Timberland makes some nice ones from their Mountain athletic line. Two that come to mind are the Free Range Hiker, which comes in a high, and low top. It is extremely supportive and well cushioned. The other one is called the drop in multi sport shoe which is a little lighter. They also came out with a comfort walking shoe line.

Sometimes you will have an easier time finding these in a hiking/outdoor stores like REI, but most sports stores should carry them. Make sure also that the shoes don't have the rounded heel, and the heel area is more flared. They are starting to make a lot of walking shoes with these rounded heels, for a smoother heel to toe transition, but they are no good for someone seeking lateral stability.

Some trail running shoes are good too, but avoid any with have anti-pronation devices on them. Trail walking shoes would be good also. New Balance makes some from their outdoor line 850/851, and the 751. Don't confuse these with their cross trainers, or walking shoes which sometimes have the same numbers. I've tried almost every other shoe in the NB line, including their walking and cross trainers, and most of them have horrible lateral stability. The outdoor line isn't bad, but they are sometimes hard to find.

Also, check out manufacturers like Merrells, Montrail, etc. If you find a shoe that is made well you may find you don't need the high top for stability. A good example is the Free Range Hiker by Timberland. I think they are very comfortable, but if they feel a little stiff for you, and you are doing some running then try to stick with trail running shoes by these manufactures. They will be a little lighter and flexible, and you may lose some lateral stability, but they will be much better than the regular running shoes. Another thing to stay away from is shoes that are overly cushioned in the heel like Nike, Reebok, etc. Too much heel cushion will also keep your foot from being stable laterally, or any other way.

Donna

Re: Running or Walking Shoes - laterally stable shoes

elliott on 9/06/01 at 04:45 (059186)

I guess we need to know what he means. If he means lateral as opposed to medial, your advice is appropriate. I took him differently, since he defined lateral as side to side, in which case the motion control shoes would probably do the trick, as most needing this type of stability need it more on the inside. There was a fairly recent Adidas running shoe which was notable for its lateral stability the way you interpreted it, but I can't remember what it was called or if it's still available.

Re: Running or Walking Shoes - "off-roading it"

adam p on 9/06/01 at 18:00 (059281)

Strength or stability in '((all)the 360 degrees of) the
transverse plane or the plane of level ground', is what I've
been seeking. So I've definitely gravitated toward the 'off
road' footwear you wrote about and your post was very helpful.

Thanks again.

Sincerely,
AP

Re: Running or Walking Shoes

elliott on 9/05/01 at 12:30 (059110)

I know a lot about running shoes from my running days. I have seen the shoe editor of Runner's World (Bob Wischnia, or Wish for short) say that walking shoes do not really offer anything over running shoes. Many running shoes have a bit of a lift in the rear, which you may prefer.

The two running shoes that come to mind meeting your criteria are the Brooks Beast and the New Balance 587 (the Crusher!). More generally, you want the class of running shoes called motion control shoes, which control overpronation (inward roll of your foot). They are heavier and firmer than other running shoes. You want one with a stiff heel counter. Fit is important, so don't limit yourself to just these two. You may want to visit the runnersworld.com web site and read the reviews of the motion control shoes. You can also pose a question to Wish who will answer if he is in town. RW reviews shoes quarterly in its magazine, with most reviews reproduced, with delay, on its web site.

In earlier posts you said you wear orthotics. The RW reviews usually say which shoes fit good with orthotics. Depending on the shoe's fit, you may find it more comfortable to either remove the shoe insole altogether to make room for your orthotics, or to cut the insole so that just the forward part is left in and meets up with the 3/4 length orthotics, if that's what you have.

Re: Running or Walking Shoes - laterally stable shoes

Donna SL on 9/06/01 at 01:07 (059182)

Hi Adam,

If I understand you correctly it seems like you are looking for a shoe that is laterally stable. I'm always searching for shoes like that, because my feet roll out, and need lateral stability. If that is the case with you stay away from any motion control shoe like the Brooks Beast, New Balance, etc., or any shoe in general that has a dual density medial piece on the inside part of the shoe. These are anti-pronation shoes, and will cause even more lateral instability. You need a good firm neutral firm shoe.

A large majority of the athletic shoes are too soft on the lateral side, except for some cross-trainers, basketball shoes, tennis shoes, etc. Most of them have some extra lateral support to keep the ankle from going out. Most running shoes have no lateral stability. Be careful though, because some walking,and cross training shoes have anti-pronation devices on them too. Usually you can tell because they have a dark gray material, or plastic piece on the inside of the arch, and/or heel area. Stay away from these.

Also, look at non-traditional athletic shoes made from manufacturers that had only made hiking type boots in the past. They have been producing what's called multi sport all purpose shoes that can be used for light hiking, walking, etc., and have great support, and are very well made. Timberland makes some nice ones from their Mountain athletic line. Two that come to mind are the Free Range Hiker, which comes in a high, and low top. It is extremely supportive and well cushioned. The other one is called the drop in multi sport shoe which is a little lighter. They also came out with a comfort walking shoe line.

Sometimes you will have an easier time finding these in a hiking/outdoor stores like REI, but most sports stores should carry them. Make sure also that the shoes don't have the rounded heel, and the heel area is more flared. They are starting to make a lot of walking shoes with these rounded heels, for a smoother heel to toe transition, but they are no good for someone seeking lateral stability.

Some trail running shoes are good too, but avoid any with have anti-pronation devices on them. Trail walking shoes would be good also. New Balance makes some from their outdoor line 850/851, and the 751. Don't confuse these with their cross trainers, or walking shoes which sometimes have the same numbers. I've tried almost every other shoe in the NB line, including their walking and cross trainers, and most of them have horrible lateral stability. The outdoor line isn't bad, but they are sometimes hard to find.

Also, check out manufacturers like Merrells, Montrail, etc. If you find a shoe that is made well you may find you don't need the high top for stability. A good example is the Free Range Hiker by Timberland. I think they are very comfortable, but if they feel a little stiff for you, and you are doing some running then try to stick with trail running shoes by these manufactures. They will be a little lighter and flexible, and you may lose some lateral stability, but they will be much better than the regular running shoes. Another thing to stay away from is shoes that are overly cushioned in the heel like Nike, Reebok, etc. Too much heel cushion will also keep your foot from being stable laterally, or any other way.

Donna

Re: Running or Walking Shoes - laterally stable shoes

elliott on 9/06/01 at 04:45 (059186)

I guess we need to know what he means. If he means lateral as opposed to medial, your advice is appropriate. I took him differently, since he defined lateral as side to side, in which case the motion control shoes would probably do the trick, as most needing this type of stability need it more on the inside. There was a fairly recent Adidas running shoe which was notable for its lateral stability the way you interpreted it, but I can't remember what it was called or if it's still available.

Re: Running or Walking Shoes - "off-roading it"

adam p on 9/06/01 at 18:00 (059281)

Strength or stability in '((all)the 360 degrees of) the
transverse plane or the plane of level ground', is what I've
been seeking. So I've definitely gravitated toward the 'off
road' footwear you wrote about and your post was very helpful.

Thanks again.

Sincerely,
AP