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Former PF Release dealing with RSD

Posted by Marie on 9/08/01 at 17:16 (059522)

I had an endoscopic plantar fasciotomy over a year ago on my left foot. Since then I have been living a nightmare that won't go away. My foot is hot and then cold, is red-blue looking, burning sensation, as well as feeling little shocks as if I am being electrocuted.

The doctor who did the surgery gave up on me after two months. I went for a second opinion and was diagnosed with RSD (Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy). I have been on numerous medications, physical therapy, and several lumbar sympathetic blocks. It seems that nothing is helping to resolve this issue or at least making my life a little easier.

I just seen my foot specialist the other day and he wants to implant a nerve stimulator. Has anyone ever had this procedure done and was it effective? Also are there any tests to determine if a patient may possibly be experiencing nerve entrapment?

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

wendyn on 9/08/01 at 17:33 (059523)

Nerve entrapment is usually confirmed with an EMG/Nerve Conduction Velocity testing. Have you seen a neurologist?

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/08/01 at 19:57 (059543)

Lumbar sympathetic blocks usually are very effective in RSD. Was the individual who administered the blocks experienced with the procedure? What sensations did you notice in your feet immediately after the blocks?
What medications have been tried?
Ed

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

Dr. Zuckerman on 9/08/01 at 21:28 (059558)

There are RSD specialist and clinics. What kind of specialists are you seeing. If appears that you have had the classic treatments . An EMG and second opinion from someone who has alot of experience with RSD. There are RSD clinics.

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

Marie on 9/10/01 at 18:33 (059773)

Yes, he is a pain management specialist who has done hundreds of these procedures. Right after I noticed that my foot was very relaxed and somewhat calm. However this only lasted for a couple of days. He has had me on various meds such as: Neurotin, Celebrex, Lortab, & Darvocet to name a few.

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

Marie on 9/10/01 at 18:35 (059775)

I have had 2 EMG studies in which I just can't be put through that type of pain again, it was horrible. I have been seeing a Foot Specialist and a Pain Management Specialist.

The foot specialist suggested sending me to a Dr. Schone?? in Baltimore, Maryland because he deals with a lot of RSD patients. Have you ever heard of him?

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/12/01 at 23:36 (060080)

I cannot see any advantage to further EMG testing--not something to be concerned with. There is a Dr. Schon, orthopedic surgeon in Baltimore who has experience with TTS--unsure about his experience with RSD. One of the posters on this site has had experience with Dr. Schon.

Did your foot appear red and warm after the lumbar sympathetic blocks? That is one way we confirm that the blocks did take. Have you had any steroids used?

The thing I would look for in a good RSD/pain management program is a multispecialty program which combines a number of modalities. Generally, an experienced anesthesiologist is a good member of the team to perform the lumbar sympathetic blocks. The team should have a neurologist as well as individuals experienced in a diversity of pain control techniques such as biofeedback, relaxation techniques. Additonal modalities may include use of TENs, microcurrent, possible trigger point therapy. Combinations of modalities by several specialties can often work better than the efforts of a single individual. University medical centers are often good places to find such approaches.
Ed

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

wendyn on 9/08/01 at 17:33 (059523)

Nerve entrapment is usually confirmed with an EMG/Nerve Conduction Velocity testing. Have you seen a neurologist?

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/08/01 at 19:57 (059543)

Lumbar sympathetic blocks usually are very effective in RSD. Was the individual who administered the blocks experienced with the procedure? What sensations did you notice in your feet immediately after the blocks?
What medications have been tried?
Ed

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

Dr. Zuckerman on 9/08/01 at 21:28 (059558)

There are RSD specialist and clinics. What kind of specialists are you seeing. If appears that you have had the classic treatments . An EMG and second opinion from someone who has alot of experience with RSD. There are RSD clinics.

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

Marie on 9/10/01 at 18:33 (059773)

Yes, he is a pain management specialist who has done hundreds of these procedures. Right after I noticed that my foot was very relaxed and somewhat calm. However this only lasted for a couple of days. He has had me on various meds such as: Neurotin, Celebrex, Lortab, & Darvocet to name a few.

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

Marie on 9/10/01 at 18:35 (059775)

I have had 2 EMG studies in which I just can't be put through that type of pain again, it was horrible. I have been seeing a Foot Specialist and a Pain Management Specialist.

The foot specialist suggested sending me to a Dr. Schone?? in Baltimore, Maryland because he deals with a lot of RSD patients. Have you ever heard of him?

Re: Former PF Release dealing with RSD

Ed Davis, DPM on 9/12/01 at 23:36 (060080)

I cannot see any advantage to further EMG testing--not something to be concerned with. There is a Dr. Schon, orthopedic surgeon in Baltimore who has experience with TTS--unsure about his experience with RSD. One of the posters on this site has had experience with Dr. Schon.

Did your foot appear red and warm after the lumbar sympathetic blocks? That is one way we confirm that the blocks did take. Have you had any steroids used?

The thing I would look for in a good RSD/pain management program is a multispecialty program which combines a number of modalities. Generally, an experienced anesthesiologist is a good member of the team to perform the lumbar sympathetic blocks. The team should have a neurologist as well as individuals experienced in a diversity of pain control techniques such as biofeedback, relaxation techniques. Additonal modalities may include use of TENs, microcurrent, possible trigger point therapy. Combinations of modalities by several specialties can often work better than the efforts of a single individual. University medical centers are often good places to find such approaches.
Ed