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Night Splint was the ONLY thing which worked for me

Posted by dorothyd on 9/11/01 at 13:47 (059886)

I had a nasty case of fasciitis -- tried anti-inflammatories (voltarin), cortisone, various exercises, deep massage, ultrasound, new orthotics. Very painful. After about a week of using the (cumbersome and ugly) night splint, I felt better. After several weeks, pain-free for the first time in about two years. I'm a believer.

Re: Night Splints

Paula G. on 7/10/01 at 20:19 (052715)

Yes, I noticed the night splints helped me almost immediately. When I would take them off to go potty, yes you must take them off to walk, I would notice I could actually walk, not hop or limp. I had a problem with my feet slipping in them at night and having them very uncomfortable to try to sleep. (PIPE) would suggest you buy one to see if it works. They are rather expensive.

Re: Night Splints

Andrea R. on 7/11/01 at 07:02 (052776)

Rita,

I found the night splint helped alot. I already had PF in my left foot and was starting to have the same pains in the right. My right foot seems fine after wearing it for a few weeks and combining it with foot massage each morning.

If you have insurance it should cover the night splint if your doctor writes a prescription for it. My ortho's office keeps them in stock. He said they found it worked so well that it was their choice of treatment before cortisone and often shots weren't needed.

I found that wearing a light weight cotton sock helped with the slipping. I also found I had to keep making adjustments until it seemed most comfortable.

Hope it helps.

Andrea

Re: Night Splints

Jeff on 7/14/01 at hrmin (053142)

If you are compliant with an effective stretching program by day, you really aren't going to find significant benefit from a night splint (not to mention that stretching can be done for free without paying for an expensive splint). The calf (gastrocnemius and soleus muscles) is only going to stretch so much. More stretching isn't really better because you'll hit a wall, so to speak, where you'll not get any additional length out of the calf.
What's and effective stretch? The only one that works for my patients is to stand on the edge of a step, curb, big phone book, etc (barefoot or with shoes) and hold the stretch for 60 seconds. Repeat 6/day. I've really found that any variation from the 'gold standard' results in a lesser stretch.
Jeff

Re: Night Splints

Julie on 7/14/01 at 15:09 (053157)

As I understand it the point of a night splint is not so much to stretch the calf muscles but to keep them from contracting overnight. If the individual can tolerate wearing it, it can, by avoiding contraction, avoid first-step pain in the morning.

Do you mean the exercise where the heels are hanging off the step? I hope anyone reading this will be careful: it is dangerous, because uncontrollable, and can, in the worst case scenario, result in a torn fascia and a ruptured Achilles Tendon.

Re: PS --

dorothyd on 9/11/01 at 13:52 (059888)

I've been reading here about some unsatisfactory night splints -- I used splint from Bird and Cronin. When a strap broke, they replaced the splint immediately and without question. And it *worked.*

Re: Night Splints

Paula G. on 7/10/01 at 20:19 (052715)

Yes, I noticed the night splints helped me almost immediately. When I would take them off to go potty, yes you must take them off to walk, I would notice I could actually walk, not hop or limp. I had a problem with my feet slipping in them at night and having them very uncomfortable to try to sleep. (PIPE) would suggest you buy one to see if it works. They are rather expensive.

Re: Night Splints

Andrea R. on 7/11/01 at 07:02 (052776)

Rita,

I found the night splint helped alot. I already had PF in my left foot and was starting to have the same pains in the right. My right foot seems fine after wearing it for a few weeks and combining it with foot massage each morning.

If you have insurance it should cover the night splint if your doctor writes a prescription for it. My ortho's office keeps them in stock. He said they found it worked so well that it was their choice of treatment before cortisone and often shots weren't needed.

I found that wearing a light weight cotton sock helped with the slipping. I also found I had to keep making adjustments until it seemed most comfortable.

Hope it helps.

Andrea

Re: Night Splints

Jeff on 7/14/01 at hrmin (053142)

If you are compliant with an effective stretching program by day, you really aren't going to find significant benefit from a night splint (not to mention that stretching can be done for free without paying for an expensive splint). The calf (gastrocnemius and soleus muscles) is only going to stretch so much. More stretching isn't really better because you'll hit a wall, so to speak, where you'll not get any additional length out of the calf.
What's and effective stretch? The only one that works for my patients is to stand on the edge of a step, curb, big phone book, etc (barefoot or with shoes) and hold the stretch for 60 seconds. Repeat 6/day. I've really found that any variation from the 'gold standard' results in a lesser stretch.
Jeff

Re: Night Splints

Julie on 7/14/01 at 15:09 (053157)

As I understand it the point of a night splint is not so much to stretch the calf muscles but to keep them from contracting overnight. If the individual can tolerate wearing it, it can, by avoiding contraction, avoid first-step pain in the morning.

Do you mean the exercise where the heels are hanging off the step? I hope anyone reading this will be careful: it is dangerous, because uncontrollable, and can, in the worst case scenario, result in a torn fascia and a ruptured Achilles Tendon.

Re: PS --

dorothyd on 9/11/01 at 13:52 (059888)

I've been reading here about some unsatisfactory night splints -- I used splint from Bird and Cronin. When a strap broke, they replaced the splint immediately and without question. And it *worked.*